Affiliated Networks


Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.



Latest Activity

Connie Regan-Blake updated an event

A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 21, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Saturday, April 21, 2018 at 7:30 pm, join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her "Taking the Stage" workshop participants, for an enchanting evening of storytelling in picturesque Black Mountain, NC. You'll enjoy a variety of stories and storytelling styles featuring tellers Jane O Cunningham from Rome, GA; Gabriele Marewski from Black Mountain, NC; Christine Phillips Westfeldt - Fairview,…See More
Glenda Council Beall posted a blog post

Writers Circle around the Table

We are located in Hayesville, NC. In April we begin our new season with outstanding Poet Mike James. Mike will read at Writers' Night Out in Blairsville, GA on Friday evening April 13. On Saturday, April 14, he will teach a class at my studio.Formally SpeakingThis class will focus on different types of traditional poetic forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, and the sestina, and will also include other verse forms such as erasures, found poems, prose poems, and last poems.Contact Glenda…See More
Mar 12
Caroline McIntyre posted an event

Rachel Carson, Silent Spring Chautauqua History Alive at UNC Asheville, OLLI Reuters Center, Manheimer Room

April 15, 2018 from 3pm to 4:30pm
Step inside the revolutionary book, Silent Spring as its author Rachel Carson reveals the reckless destruction of our living world. Written more than 55 years ago Silent Spring inspired the Environmental Movement and has never been out of print. And now you have a chance to ask the author, Rachel Carson, how this came to be. But these aren’t just performances. They’re a chance to step into Living History – to ask questions and go one on one with a women whose books shaped our country and our…See More
Mar 7
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted blog posts
Mar 7
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo

lexie on deck_edited-1

"She looks like I look in my imagination right before I've had my coffee ... relaxed, bothered (by something, anything) and fully aware that I'm almost, but not quite, the center of the universe ... a feeling that quickly fades after that…"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford replied to Kathryn Stripling Byer's discussion Mary Adams's new chapbook COMMANDMENT
"This is so perfect ... the thought of every woman, who KNOWS what the men are thinking!  But now at least we have an idea! This makes me happy in a sad, lovely sort of way!"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted a photo

Mom in Her Writing Nook ...

She was working on the "About the Authors" section of "Echoes Across the Blue Ridge" when I captured this one morning. Though you can't see it, her coffee cup was within gentle reach that morning. Roxie is at her feet.
Mar 4
Carolyn Bennett Fraiser updated their profile photo
Feb 15
Harold N. Stern updated their profile
Feb 6
Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

lexie on deck_edited-1

Lexie likes to sleep in the sunshine even on cold days.
Feb 6
Nancy Werking Poling posted a photo

Latest non-fiction book

In 1945 Indiana prohibited marriage between a white person and anyone with more than one-eighth "Negro blood." Yet Daniel (black) and Anna (white) gave up family, friends, and eventually even country to create a life together. Their 42-year marriage…
Feb 5
Nancy Werking Poling replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Bent Creek, the 4-part story
"Rob, Thanks for putting this into one document. I've been following the narrative in the Citizen-Times. I find it an added resource for my next writing project. In 1910 my husband's grandfather (1866-1947) showed up in Missouri and said…"
Feb 5
Rebecca L Caldwell updated their profile
Feb 5
Lee Ann Brown replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Writer Olive Dargan rises from obscurity
"Great Article!  Heart wrenching about her destroyed manuscripts and letters and notes but I will look for more of Olive Dargan!     Lee Ann Brown"
Feb 5
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Feb 4
Rap Monster posted a blog post


Focusing on the aftermath of the 2008 Financial Crisis, The Bang Bang Brokers tells the story of a hedge fund manager (based on a composite of real life traders) who got rich off of predicting the subprime fallout. His guilt and suicidal impulses lead him to a chance meeting with a Latino Gang, headed by small time weed dealer Ramon (Erik Michael Estrada). In hopes that Ramon will kill him in exchange for the favor, Rolley (played by Donihue) robs a rival Black Gang, earning the pair a ton of…See More
Feb 4


What I remember the most about Vance Elementary School in West Asheville , NC is the color red. I could remember lots of other things about my first school. It was at Vance that I said my first curse word. Also, I got into my first fight, saw my first professional yo yo performance and was caught breaking into the concession stand. I learned a lot at Vance. I learned that there are good teachers and not so good teachers. I learned that the world is inhabited by mean spirited people and very kind people. I learned that you don't always win, but if you try hard you manage to win every now and then.
Vance was a three story school shaped very much like an airplane. On each floor there were two "wings". The first and second graders were on the first floor, then came the third and fourth graders and the fifth and sixth graders took up residence on the third floor. The center of the school,or the fuselage, housed the offices, art and music rooms and the lunchroom. There were big,broad steps leading to the front doors and everything, the brick in the building , the steps and the doors were all colored a deep, dark red. Even the halls, finished concrete , were painted red. So its no wonder that all of my memories of Vance, the good ones and the bad ones are shaded in red.
There are so many stories I could tell about being at Vance. I saw my first "girlfight" there. I remember breaking my arm and then playing football with my cast on and breaking it a second time. Not too smart, really. I missed the sex ed lecture because I had my tonsils out. There were the pickup softball games played almost every morning on the ball field and I remember my mother serving cokes out of a red drink box filled with ice at the Halloween festival. We had a May Pole and in an unrelated incident my friend Charlie Teague decided he didn't like our first grade teacher so he climbed out the first floor window during the first week of school and ran home not to return until the fall of the next year. Staying behind a year must have been good for him because he ended up being president of his senior class 12 years later.
The story I would most like to share, though, is the one about the fifty cent piece in the heating vent. One afternoon when I was in the sixth grade and 11 years old, I left school a little later in the afternoon than I normally would have. I have no idea why I was delayed. The only thing I am sure of is that I didn't stay late to put in extra study time. Anyway, I left later than usual and on the way down the hall I happened to look down into one of the heating vents that was in the hall floor. The vents were about 2ft x 2ft square with corrugated steel frames that served as air ways. They were flush with the hall floor and were laced with metal strips spaced about an inch apart that allowed the air to flow. The aluminum duct made a 90 degree turn about three feet below the hall floor. And lying on that air duct was a fifty cent piece that someone else had dropped through the vent, just three feet from my reach. I pulled on the metal frame to try to gain access to the air duct but they were welded and impossible to budge. The space between the metal strips on the top of the vent was too small for my arms- but I really wanted that fifty cents. I thought just a second and then dashed as fast as I could down the hall and stairs and out the doors and headed for home.
Our house was about a ten minute jog from the school. I cut through the woods and then ran up the big Olney Road hill then took a left to our little bungalow on Maple Crescent. I burst inside, there was no one home, grabbed a broom and some chewing gum and then ran back outside and back to the school. My feet were flying and my heart was pounding. I remember being so fearful that someone else would see the fifty cents and it would be gone when I returned. But luck was with me. When I reached Vance School the door was still open and when I got to the third floor, the fifty cents was still lying, as if it had been waiting just for me, at the bottom of the air duct. I chewed the bubble gum, stuck it to the end of the broom stick, and gingerly retrieved my reward as the fifty cent piece was raised so carefully until it cleared the vented grate and was in my pocket. By the way, fifty cents was a lot of money in the 1950's when this adventure was taking place on the third floor of a virtually empty school building. One of the cool things about that event is that I never told anyone about what I had done. Somehow there was a strange satisfaction drawn out of keeping my creativity and hard work and good luck to myself. Someone else will have to figure out the psychology associated with my secrecy. It might have been,simply, that I might have worried that if I told I would have to return the money to its original owner and I believed that I had earned that money for myself.
Fast forward forty years to a night near our home in Georgia when Anna Lee and I were driving back from a dinner meeting and we had stopped to get gas. I went in the station to pay and overheard a conversation about the man who was supposed to have come by to empty the trash. Evidently, he had decided not to show up for his job that particular night. There was a $10.00 bill lying on the top of the cash register waiting for him when he completed his nightly duty. You can guess the rest of the story. I went back to the car, took off my sport coat, got a pair of gloves from the trunk of the car and proceeded to empty a 55 gallon can of trash into the dumpster about 20 yards away. I replaced the can and went back inside the station and took the ten dollars for myself. It had taken all of five minutes. I got exactly the same satisfaction from taking out that trash and putting that $10.00 in my pocket as I did when I was eleven years old and retrieved the 50 cent piece from the air duct on the third floor of old Vance School-go figure.

Posted by Toby Hill

Views: 28


You need to be a member of The Read on WNC to add comments!

Join The Read on WNC

© 2018   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service