Affiliated Networks


Forum

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

City Lights Bookstore posted events
21 hours ago
Sue Diehl posted an event
Thumbnail

Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon at Montreat College, Gaither Fellowship Hall

June 10, 2017 from 12pm to 2:30pm
Author Vicki Lane, who is working on her seventh novel, will be the guest speaker at the Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon at noon on Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Gaither Fellowship Hall.  Reservations: 669-8012 Ext. 3502Open to the Public.See More
23 hours ago
Rose Senehi posted an event

Rose Senehi will read from her new novel: CAROLINA BELLE at MALAPROPS BOOKS & CAFE

May 3, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
Belle McKenzie is obsessed with finding the best apple anyone ever bit into and determined to rekindle the love this obsession has nearly destroyed.        Woven throughout Carolina Belle is the fascinating history of Henderson County, North Carolina’s, apple orchards that endlessly unfold on the county’s horizons and still bear the same names as the early settlers to the area. Senehi, known for her historically accurate novels, sprinkles the book with stories of the development of the Southern…See More
Thursday
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Becky Stone Presents Maya Angelou

Chautauqua Alive! Becky Stone Presents Maya AngelouWednesday, May 24 at 6:30pmPack Memorial Library67 Haywood Street250-4700The Buncombe Chautauqua Committee and Pack Memorial Library will present a pre-Chautauqua special event in Lord Auditorium at Pack Memorial Library at 6:30 Pm on May 24.  Renowned storyteller Becky Stone will present “Becoming Maya Angelou.”   Ms. Stone will be appearing as Maya Angelou in the opening program of the annual Chautauqua series that begins June 19.  On May 24,…See More
Thursday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Wednesday
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Prize-winning YA author Sedgwick at Literacy fundraiser

Fundraiser for Literacy Council & Book Launch Marcus Sedgwick Tuesday April 25th 5:30-7:30 p.m., Twisted Laurel, downtown Asheville, 130 College Street COST: $45 per person (ticket includes hardcover book, food, and non-alcoholic beverage) All proceeds go to Literacy Council from press release Marcus Sedgwick, author of Saint Death Spellbound Children's Bookshop, Asheville's locally owned independent bookstore for kids and teens, presents a special event with one of the most critically…See More
Monday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dellinger Mill--sacred place east of Bakersville

A Mitchell County gristmill sifts through 150 yearsby Rob Neufeld PHOTO CAPTION: Book cover, “Dellinger Grist Mill on Cane Creek” by Jack Dellinger.             In 1861, when Bakersville got a post office, locals changed the town name from Bakersville to Davis, after Jefferson Davis, President of the…See More
Monday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Apr 12
Caroline McIntyre posted events
Apr 9
Susan Weinberg posted an event

Reading by Poet Al Young at Table Rock Room, Plemmons Student Union, App State University

April 6, 2017 from 7:30pm to 8:45pm
A reading by past California Poet Laureate Al Young in Appalachian State's Hughlene Bostian Frank Visiting Writers Series. The reading will be preceded by a craft talk titled "No Poem, No Home" from 2-3:15 the same day.Both are in ASU's Plemmons Student Union. Free admission; books will be available for sale and signing. See More
Mar 30
Rob Neufeld's 2 discussions were featured
Mar 23
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Citizen science author in Asheville April 6

Eco author in Asheville April 6 Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson…See More
Mar 23
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
Thumbnail

Appalachian Authors Book Signing and Reading at Historic Carson House

April 8, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author and reader at the Appalachian Authors  Book Signing and Reading to be held at the Historic Carson House on Saturday, April 8 from 10-3. She will debut her new poetry collection A Part of Me. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.See More
Mar 23
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 22
Gary Carden posted a video

2012 Award Winner for Literature -- Gary Neil Carden

A literature and drama teacher turned storyteller, Gary Neil Carden is an award winning playwright whose tales are informed by mountain life in North Carolin...
Mar 22
Gary Carden updated their profile
Mar 22

Tar heel Roots in Sedro Woolley Washington


I am a transplanted "Tar heel". I have never forgotten my Western North Carolina roots, and although I have lived in California for a good portion of my life, I still consider Western North Carolina as "home."

In August of 1981, after my Dad's memorial service, a group of family members went out to eat at a family style restaurant in Sylva. At that point, one or another of my family members mentioned about Sedro Woolley, and said that the settlers there had retained their Mountain Crafts and arts. I have had it on my mind ever since. Every time I had conversation with someone from Washington State, I would ask them if they knew about the North Carolina lumbermen who settled in Sedro Woolley, but no one seemed to be informed about them.


I was very excited to hear that Washington State has a large population of "Tar heel" Descendants, since I have lived in Northern California for some time, and Washington State is fairly close. I have since acquired family members from the Pacific Northwest, but they did not know very much about Sedro Woolley . Below is a photo of downtown Sedro Woolley, Washington.



These "Tar heels" moved to Sedro Woolley in the early 1900's and became a permanent part of that community. They kept their Mountain Crafts and arts and they have a festival now and then to celebrate. There are approximately 17,000 descendants of these "Tar heels" living in Washington State in and around Sedro Woolley.

Found somewhere or other on the Web; "Tar Heel Project History Panels Coming Home
Nearly 6 million people reside in Washington State. Who are we and where did we come from? How did we come to be
Washingtonians?
In 2006 Humanities Washington, in partnership with the Ethnic Heritage Council and the Museum of History and In-
dustry (MOHAI), launched Washington Stories to answer these questions. A special exhibit project funded through a
National Endowment for the Humanities' We the People grant, Washington Stories told stories of selected ethnic and
tribal groups in a traveling exhibit, and connected these small grassroots organizations with resources and technical
assistance.
Each of the groups worked with MOHAI and Humanities Washington staff over the summer of 2006 to research and
designed two exhibit panels each. The complete group of panels toured throughout the state of Washington.
A wave of immigrants from North Carolina, known as "Tar Heels", arrived in Skagit County in the early 1900s to work in
coal, logging and, later, agricultural fields. The "Tar Heels Roots project" is an impressive documentation of the history and culture of these migrants to Washington State. Today over 17,000 descendents of this internal migration live in the valley.
Now the project is coming home. The Lincoln Theatre Foundation is proud to offer the Tar Heel Roots Panels for their first viewing in Skagit County at the November 7, 2008, meeting of the Sedro-Woolley Chamber of Commerce. Later
the panels will be displayed at the Lincoln Theatre in Mount Vernon, and ultimately they will have a permanent home at the Sedro-Woolley Museum.
Kathy Reim, Lincoln Board member and co-facilitator with Vicky Young of the research, will share information about
the project and the hopes of making a bi-annual Tar Heel Festival and Reunion a part of our community planning for
2008. As she explains," This is a rich part of our history in Skagit County, and I believe we learn to respect others when we respect our own roots. It is great to find the places where history and hearts can connect."
Lynn Hotaling, who writes a column for the Sylva Herald wrote about this celebration..in her Sept 7, 2006
Ruralite Cafe.

Views: 2593

Comment

You need to be a member of The Read on WNC to add comments!

Join The Read on WNC

Comment by Tipper on March 10, 2010 at 5:24pm
Just Wonderful Sallie!! Such a neat connection to western NC. Thank you for letting me know about it!

Tipper

© 2017   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service