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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Wednesday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

First Drumbeat

First Drumbeat(Part of Living Poem) The time has come.Call it a drum,Or a crumb,What’s left of life. I used to tell a jokeWhen my life was wide,And I was a stud,And not a dud—I knowI’m not a dud.  I’m a dude,A dad.  But everyone mustRebut the dud chargeAt summing up time. Oh yeah, the joke,A trademark one for meIn that it’s not funny. I used to say I’ll never retireFrom writingBecause if I’m ever…See More
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks for the prompt, Joan!  I have attached the whole work in progress as a doc at the bottom of the table of contents page: http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/special/living-poem"
Sep 22
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Is there a way from this website to print everything or might you send me such a document to bayjh@icloud.com?"
Sep 22
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
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Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Branch McDowell County Public Library

October 24, 2018 from 4pm to 5pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be launching her new poetry collection A Neighborhood Changes (Finishing Line Press, 2018) at a book presentation and signing to be held at the McDowell County Public Library in Marion on October 24.See More
Sep 21
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"This could be interesting--thanks!  I'm at 828-505-1973 (my home business office).  And RNeufeld@charter.net."
Sep 20
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"I'll ask the kids, Barb and Ethan, if they have any contacts who might have an interest in this as a unique topic for any performers they know. It might also be something that my friend Ruby Lerner could brainstorm about to her theatre…"
Sep 19
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks much, Joan!  I'm trying to get some attention for these poems.  Triple Whammy is def in rap style.  And the beat goes on.  Hugs from me and Bev."
Sep 19
Joan Henehan posted a discussion

on Reading Living Poem

You might be the first ALS-subject-matter rapper. Add some beats and spread it. the time is now...See More
Sep 15
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

More from the World of ALS

More from the World of ALS (Part of Living Poem)    Negotiating steps is like someone who seeksTo emulate a goat on mountain peaks. Crossing a threshold, limping inIs like the valley-walking of an Olympian. A cane and its grip make a fellow stopTo consider the physics of leans and drops. To know how a forefinger grabs and digsImagine your digits are chestnut twigs When a new drug trial notably…See More
Sep 6
Nancy Werking Poling posted a discussion

RANDALL KENAN SELECTS NANCY WERKING POLING WINNER OF THE 2018 ALEX ALBRIGHT CREATIVE NONFICTION PRIZE

RANDALL KENAN SELECTS NANCY WERKING POLING WINNER OF THE 2018 ALEX ALBRIGHT CREATIVE NONFICTION PRIZE(31 August 2018)Nancy Werking Poling of Black Mountain is the winner of the 2018 Alex Albright Creative Nonfiction Prize competition for "Leander’s Lies." Poling will receive $1000 from the North Carolina Literary Review, thanks to a generous NCLR reader’s donation that allowed this year’s honorarium to increase (from the previous award of $250). Her winning essay will be published in the North…See More
Sep 4
Rob Neufeld shared their discussion on Facebook
Sep 4

Tar heel Roots in Sedro Woolley Washington


I am a transplanted "Tar heel". I have never forgotten my Western North Carolina roots, and although I have lived in California for a good portion of my life, I still consider Western North Carolina as "home."

In August of 1981, after my Dad's memorial service, a group of family members went out to eat at a family style restaurant in Sylva. At that point, one or another of my family members mentioned about Sedro Woolley, and said that the settlers there had retained their Mountain Crafts and arts. I have had it on my mind ever since. Every time I had conversation with someone from Washington State, I would ask them if they knew about the North Carolina lumbermen who settled in Sedro Woolley, but no one seemed to be informed about them.


I was very excited to hear that Washington State has a large population of "Tar heel" Descendants, since I have lived in Northern California for some time, and Washington State is fairly close. I have since acquired family members from the Pacific Northwest, but they did not know very much about Sedro Woolley . Below is a photo of downtown Sedro Woolley, Washington.



These "Tar heels" moved to Sedro Woolley in the early 1900's and became a permanent part of that community. They kept their Mountain Crafts and arts and they have a festival now and then to celebrate. There are approximately 17,000 descendants of these "Tar heels" living in Washington State in and around Sedro Woolley.

Found somewhere or other on the Web; "Tar Heel Project History Panels Coming Home
Nearly 6 million people reside in Washington State. Who are we and where did we come from? How did we come to be
Washingtonians?
In 2006 Humanities Washington, in partnership with the Ethnic Heritage Council and the Museum of History and In-
dustry (MOHAI), launched Washington Stories to answer these questions. A special exhibit project funded through a
National Endowment for the Humanities' We the People grant, Washington Stories told stories of selected ethnic and
tribal groups in a traveling exhibit, and connected these small grassroots organizations with resources and technical
assistance.
Each of the groups worked with MOHAI and Humanities Washington staff over the summer of 2006 to research and
designed two exhibit panels each. The complete group of panels toured throughout the state of Washington.
A wave of immigrants from North Carolina, known as "Tar Heels", arrived in Skagit County in the early 1900s to work in
coal, logging and, later, agricultural fields. The "Tar Heels Roots project" is an impressive documentation of the history and culture of these migrants to Washington State. Today over 17,000 descendents of this internal migration live in the valley.
Now the project is coming home. The Lincoln Theatre Foundation is proud to offer the Tar Heel Roots Panels for their first viewing in Skagit County at the November 7, 2008, meeting of the Sedro-Woolley Chamber of Commerce. Later
the panels will be displayed at the Lincoln Theatre in Mount Vernon, and ultimately they will have a permanent home at the Sedro-Woolley Museum.
Kathy Reim, Lincoln Board member and co-facilitator with Vicky Young of the research, will share information about
the project and the hopes of making a bi-annual Tar Heel Festival and Reunion a part of our community planning for
2008. As she explains," This is a rich part of our history in Skagit County, and I believe we learn to respect others when we respect our own roots. It is great to find the places where history and hearts can connect."
Lynn Hotaling, who writes a column for the Sylva Herald wrote about this celebration..in her Sept 7, 2006
Ruralite Cafe.

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Comment by Tipper on March 10, 2010 at 5:24pm
Just Wonderful Sallie!! Such a neat connection to western NC. Thank you for letting me know about it!

Tipper

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