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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

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Ellington in Asheville--a survey

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Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

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Connie Regan-Blake posted events
14 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Intermission

IntermissionHear audio by clicking mp3 attachment!(Part of poem, "Coalescence") I thought I might take a break at this point to look around,Now that I’m in the business of making things resound.It’s so nice to have the luxury of being carefree. If you stop and sit back and try to take in everything,It stuns you and you can’t focus on anythingUntil something crops up, and what…See More
19 hours ago
Joan Henehan replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Coalescence
"It's an odyssey..."
Jan 8
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Coalescence

Coalescence (part of  Living Poem)by Rob Neufeld Intro Don’t listen, children, and do not hear.(A monster is coming and there’s no escapeWithin this story, and no good way to tell it, Except to gaze at the horror as at a flower,A disaster streaming off extremes it breedsEverywhere and in our minds, disabling our power.) Distractions are good, puzzles that teaseAnd please and fill the main scene,…See More
Dec 11, 2018
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Sultan's Dream

The Sultan’s Dream (Part of Living Poem) When it comes to walking, the jig’s up.No more fit lad sitting at the pub.No more flim-flam smiling with a limp. See how the legs totter and the torso leans.Do you know what a lame sultan dreams?Of reclining on a divan wearing pantaloons, Comparing his plight to a mountaineer’sNegotiating an icy bluff in a fierce wind,And then lounging in a tent to unwind. Which…See More
Nov 15, 2018
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Tale of Ononis

The Tale of Ononis by Rob Neufeld Part 1: The Making of a Celebrity ❧  Hare Begins His Tale  Ononis was my region’s name.People now call it Never-the-same.I’ll start with the day a delivery came. The package I got was a devil’s dare,Swaddled and knotted in Swamp Bloat hairAnd bearing, in red, one word: “Beware!” Bloats are creatures from the Land of Mud Pies,Wallowing in waste with tightly closed eyesUntil fears bring tears and the bleary bloats rise.   ❧  Hare’s Colleagues  I asked my boss,…See More
Nov 9, 2018
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Drop Your Troubles: A Solo Storytelling Performance with Connie Regan-Blake at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

December 1, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join this internationally renowned storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she transforms a packed theater into an intimate circle of friends with old-timey charm, wisdom, and humor. We’ll also welcome the Singer of  Stories, Donna Marie Todd, who will perform her original story, “The Amazing Zicafoose Sisters.” Connie’s last two shows at BMCA have sold…See More
Nov 6, 2018
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story and Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Nov 6, 2018
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story & Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Oct 28, 2018
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” The event will be hosted by the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, just a short drive from Asheville nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding the area. Call the Center for advance tickets (828) 669-0930 or order…See More
Oct 28, 2018
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive, affirming…See More
Oct 28, 2018
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Oct 17, 2018
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12, 2018
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3, 2018
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2, 2018
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22, 2018

Great Great Grandfather Died In A POW Camp In Chicago

My great great grandfather William Goldsmith died in a Prison Camp in Chicago. There is a documentary sometimes shown on The History Channel about this camp called 80 Acres of Hell. click here
This is the family history.. The way we ended up in the Mountains of NC is that John Goldsmith, the
husband of Elizabeth Marchbanks, died in May 1825 in Simpsonville,SC (Greenville County).He is buried in the old Goldsmith Family Cemetery on the old Goldsmith Plantation in Simpsonville (yes, Plantation). The Goldsmiths were very wealthy people in SC. Elizabeth left SC, and moved to the mountains of Western NC to be close to her brother that lived there. She took their children with them, one of them being William. It would have been better for the children if they had stayed in SC, they would have inherited a lot of money and property from their Grandfather.
As it was they came to WNC. The original Goldsmith's started with William Goldsmith b.1761 in Virginia and married Elizabeth Rountree in Union Co. SC, they settled in Simpsonville, SC in the1780's.
My GG Grandfather, William was rather old when the Civil War came along. He was in his early 50's, having been born about 1812. (That of course was old in those days) He joined the army to be with some of his older sons. They made it through, even though his one son was captured and taken to Camp Douglas along with WIlliam. William died there about March 9, 1864, and is buried in the mass grave for Confederate Soldiers. This is the monument..click here

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Comment by terrell garren on July 8, 2009 at 7:37pm
Sallie,

There is a photo and post on my blog from Jerry Hagan. His GGGF probably knew your Mr. Goldsmith. He was also in the 64th and captured at Cumberland Gap.
Terrell
Comment by Sallie on May 19, 2009 at 9:41pm
Thanks for all of your research Terrell.
Comment by terrell garren on May 19, 2009 at 12:37pm
Hello Sallie,

Sorry I'm late getting back to you I've just been very busy. I did find your Mr. Hare. He is in North Carolina Troops, Vol. XV, page 577. He is listed in Company I, 68th NC Infantry. The record does not say a lot. It reads as follows: "Hare, Fletcher, Private Previously served as a Private in Company B, Cohoon's Battalion Virginia Infantry. Enlisted in this Company in Gates County on December 10, 1863, for the war. Reported absent with leave on April 30, 1864. No further records."

There is one more volume of NC Troops to be done in the future. It will be a long time before it comes out but it might shed new light on his case. Also, since he was absent with leave it could be that he was assigned duty at home?
Terrell Garren
Comment by Sallie on May 8, 2009 at 9:54pm
Oh Terrell that is so sad. Our brave ancestors who felt is was their duty to fight , having been taken to that horrible place and then to have their remains so disrespected..
Comment by terrell garren on May 8, 2009 at 8:46am
Sallie,

You might also be interested and saddened to know that some of the dead were just thrown off a cliff into Lake Michigan. A man named C. H. Jordan was paid a good wage to bury the dead Confederates. Since he wanted to keep all the money he bribed guards who then supplied Confederate prisoners as forced labor. For further savings these Confederates were forced to carry their own dead comrades and throw them over a cliff into Lake Michigan. Jordan was under contract to provide coffins. According to Levy, there were more dead prisoners than were actually reported. Unfortunately, some of the silt at the bottom of the lake contains the remains of our ancestors. Terrell Garren
Comment by Sallie on May 8, 2009 at 8:13am
Thanks for the information about all of the Confederate African Americans who were captured and sent to Camp Douglas, Terrell G. I did not realize these facts.
My ancestor Perminter Morgan b.1755 had 8 sons who all had so many descendants, for people liked to have many children in the olden days to help out on the farm. There must be thousands of descendants, but I keep trying to document them . The Morgans from the 64th at Camp Douglas are surely relatives.
Comment by terrell garren on May 7, 2009 at 10:26pm
Hello rac,

The eight African American Confederates you refer to at Camp Douglas were just the ones captured with General Morgan? There were many more who went through the prison. There were a number of black Confederates murdered by racist Union guards. Black prisoners were released in 1864 but by then it was too late for many of them. Some of the black Confederates were not slaves but free men who signed up to ride with Morgan. None of these claims are mine, I'm just refering to the findings of former Assistant Attorney General of Illinois, George Levy. All of this information is well documented in his masterpiece work To Die In Chicago: Confederate Prisoners at Camp Douglas, 1862-65. Terrell Garren
Comment by terrell garren on May 5, 2009 at 7:27am
Sallie,

Since you had at least one ancestor who died at Camp Douglas in Chicago, I was wondering if you knew that a number of Morgans died there also. They were also in the 64th, as was your Mr. Goldsmith.
TG
Comment by Sallie on May 5, 2009 at 12:46am
Thanks TG
Comment by terrell garren on May 4, 2009 at 4:30pm
Sallie,

I have volume XIV of NC Troops here at my library. George Whitfield Morgan appears on page 510. No, he was not killed while AWOL. I can say that with reasonable certainty because from reading the record it is clear that he was returned to duty and promoted to Lieutenant after the AWOL notation. He was probably not AWOL at all, sometimes that comment was written in the record becasue the logging officer did not know where he was. Apparently he was on some sort of "detach" or "detachment duty." He was later assigned to the 7th Cavalry and as a Lieutenant. Then the record indicates that he "Previously served as a 2nd Lieutenant in 108th Regiment N. C. Militia." The full name should read NC militia for Home Defense. These units are often refered to as "home guard." It's pretty clear to me that he was on duty after the AWOL comment was written in the record. My guess is that he was killed at the Battle of Swannanoa Gap or when the Union Army raided and sacked Asheville on April 26, 1865. He was probably at the Battle of Swannanoa Gap due to his late assignments. Since he was an officer at the end of the war he may have been assassinated by the various "hit" squads that operated in the area at the end of the war. They were paid by Union operatives and most of them were Confederate deserters who knew the area. They targeted Confederate officers. Captain Balis Edney in Henderson County and Colonel William Walker in Cherokee County are the two best known victims of this type of warfare. We may find out more about him when the state finishes the last volume of NC Troops. It is supposed to include the "Milita" or "Home Guard," as well as the Junior and Senior Reserves. Union Soliders from NC are also to be included as I understand it. I expect it will be at least another year before it is completed.
Terrell Garren

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