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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

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Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Black Mountain Library

June 15, 2019 from 3pm to 4pm
Can women rescue the planet from ecological disaster?Nancy Werking Poling will launch her new novel, WHILE EARTH STILL SPEAKS, set in WNC. She'll tell the stories behind the story: How did Mary (more crone than virgin) get into the narrative? And Mary Surratt, a co-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth?See More
Jun 10
Caroline McIntyre posted events
Apr 29
Rob Neufeld updated their profile
Apr 13
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Flat Rock history via a road

Travelling back in time on a Flat Rock roadby Rob Neufeld             If you walk the one mile length of North Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, you step nearly 200 years into the past.            At the east end, the 21st century reigns.  Fronting six-lane Spartanburg Highway, a super-Ingles sits above a bog; and a CVS store faces an Octopus Garden smoke shop, a chiropractor, a cell phone provider, and a six-lane avenue to I-26 a mile away .            Neither Ingles nor CVS carries the big…See More
Apr 8
George Ellison left a comment for Renea Winchester
"luv ya Renea ... Kephart bio finally done after 40 years ... free at last ... free at last... great god almighty ... free a last!"
Apr 5
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Connie Regan-Blake Storytelling at Hendersonville Public Library at Henderson County Public Library - Main Branch

June 13, 2019 from 6pm to 7pm
Join Connie Regan-Blake for a family oriented evening of stories at the Hendersonville Library.See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Please join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” Here are the tellers for our April 6th “Slice of Life” performance.  Christine Phillips Westfeldt, Kyra Freeman, Steve Tate, Alberta Hipps and more! The event is hosted by the …See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive,…See More
Apr 1
Rap Monster posted a blog post

Stealth Hazy - 'Gun Clap'

Stealth Hazy - Gun ClapI got 80 rounds with a beam on it riding dirty I'm smoking chronic top off hear that system pound 808 thats subsonicI double down quadruple upstraight droppin with no cutwilt chamberlain on the reboundand you a fan just starstruckI…See More
Mar 26
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Mar 2
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Feb 8
Sue Diehl posted an event
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Montreat College Friends of the Library Celebrate National Library Week at Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College, Montreat, NC

April 9, 2019 from 3pm to 5pm
Patti Callahan, author of the recent novel Becoming Mrs. Lewis, and Don W. King author of Out of My Bone: the Letters of Joy Davidman, A Naked Tree: Love Sonnets to C. S. Lewis, and Yet One More Spring: a Critical Study of Joy Davidman, will co-present on their works about Joy and her husband C.S. Lewis.  The event is free and open to the public on April 9, 2019 in Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College.Reception and Book signing to followSee More
Feb 8
William Roy Pipes posted a discussion

TWO NEW APPALACHIAN NOVELS

I have, just released two Appalachian Novels.OUT OF THE SHADOWS, begins deep in the Appalachian Mountains of in WNC. It is partly a true story about a young man who ran away from home at the age of fifteen. He meets another runaway, and they fall in love.A journey where he faced adversaries, but also success as he walked, hitchhiked, and made his way across the country.GONE LIKE A CANDLE IN THE WIND, is a story of three young people growing up in a farming community in the Appalachian…See More
Jan 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Main Show

The Main Show: a story-poem stage presentation(part of  Living Poem)See video of Act 1, Scene 1: The SettingProgram Notes (A program note reader comes out to read from the program notes.) Reader: Don’t listen, children, and do not hear.(A monster is coming and there’s no escapeWithin this story, and no good way to tell it, Except to gaze at the horror as at a…See More
Jan 26
Don Talley posted a discussion

Hollywood Pictures Inc in Fairview

In the 1920's it seemed the whole country was caught up in excitement about films and Hollywood.    Asheville and Western North Carolina were well aware of the hoopla of Hollywood.   In fact, Hollywood (or at least filmmaking) was already beginning to come to Western NC.I recently stumble across an article from the Jun 6 1926 issue of The Asheville Citizen Times which mentions that Hollywood Pictures Inc, was planning to film just south of Asheville, near Fairview.  But....was this really…See More
Jan 23

Great Great Grandfather Died In A POW Camp In Chicago

My great great grandfather William Goldsmith died in a Prison Camp in Chicago. There is a documentary sometimes shown on The History Channel about this camp called 80 Acres of Hell. click here
This is the family history.. The way we ended up in the Mountains of NC is that John Goldsmith, the
husband of Elizabeth Marchbanks, died in May 1825 in Simpsonville,SC (Greenville County).He is buried in the old Goldsmith Family Cemetery on the old Goldsmith Plantation in Simpsonville (yes, Plantation). The Goldsmiths were very wealthy people in SC. Elizabeth left SC, and moved to the mountains of Western NC to be close to her brother that lived there. She took their children with them, one of them being William. It would have been better for the children if they had stayed in SC, they would have inherited a lot of money and property from their Grandfather.
As it was they came to WNC. The original Goldsmith's started with William Goldsmith b.1761 in Virginia and married Elizabeth Rountree in Union Co. SC, they settled in Simpsonville, SC in the1780's.
My GG Grandfather, William was rather old when the Civil War came along. He was in his early 50's, having been born about 1812. (That of course was old in those days) He joined the army to be with some of his older sons. They made it through, even though his one son was captured and taken to Camp Douglas along with WIlliam. William died there about March 9, 1864, and is buried in the mass grave for Confederate Soldiers. This is the monument..click here

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Comment by terrell garren on July 8, 2009 at 7:37pm
Sallie,

There is a photo and post on my blog from Jerry Hagan. His GGGF probably knew your Mr. Goldsmith. He was also in the 64th and captured at Cumberland Gap.
Terrell
Comment by Sallie on May 19, 2009 at 9:41pm
Thanks for all of your research Terrell.
Comment by terrell garren on May 19, 2009 at 12:37pm
Hello Sallie,

Sorry I'm late getting back to you I've just been very busy. I did find your Mr. Hare. He is in North Carolina Troops, Vol. XV, page 577. He is listed in Company I, 68th NC Infantry. The record does not say a lot. It reads as follows: "Hare, Fletcher, Private Previously served as a Private in Company B, Cohoon's Battalion Virginia Infantry. Enlisted in this Company in Gates County on December 10, 1863, for the war. Reported absent with leave on April 30, 1864. No further records."

There is one more volume of NC Troops to be done in the future. It will be a long time before it comes out but it might shed new light on his case. Also, since he was absent with leave it could be that he was assigned duty at home?
Terrell Garren
Comment by Sallie on May 8, 2009 at 9:54pm
Oh Terrell that is so sad. Our brave ancestors who felt is was their duty to fight , having been taken to that horrible place and then to have their remains so disrespected..
Comment by terrell garren on May 8, 2009 at 8:46am
Sallie,

You might also be interested and saddened to know that some of the dead were just thrown off a cliff into Lake Michigan. A man named C. H. Jordan was paid a good wage to bury the dead Confederates. Since he wanted to keep all the money he bribed guards who then supplied Confederate prisoners as forced labor. For further savings these Confederates were forced to carry their own dead comrades and throw them over a cliff into Lake Michigan. Jordan was under contract to provide coffins. According to Levy, there were more dead prisoners than were actually reported. Unfortunately, some of the silt at the bottom of the lake contains the remains of our ancestors. Terrell Garren
Comment by Sallie on May 8, 2009 at 8:13am
Thanks for the information about all of the Confederate African Americans who were captured and sent to Camp Douglas, Terrell G. I did not realize these facts.
My ancestor Perminter Morgan b.1755 had 8 sons who all had so many descendants, for people liked to have many children in the olden days to help out on the farm. There must be thousands of descendants, but I keep trying to document them . The Morgans from the 64th at Camp Douglas are surely relatives.
Comment by terrell garren on May 7, 2009 at 10:26pm
Hello rac,

The eight African American Confederates you refer to at Camp Douglas were just the ones captured with General Morgan? There were many more who went through the prison. There were a number of black Confederates murdered by racist Union guards. Black prisoners were released in 1864 but by then it was too late for many of them. Some of the black Confederates were not slaves but free men who signed up to ride with Morgan. None of these claims are mine, I'm just refering to the findings of former Assistant Attorney General of Illinois, George Levy. All of this information is well documented in his masterpiece work To Die In Chicago: Confederate Prisoners at Camp Douglas, 1862-65. Terrell Garren
Comment by terrell garren on May 5, 2009 at 7:27am
Sallie,

Since you had at least one ancestor who died at Camp Douglas in Chicago, I was wondering if you knew that a number of Morgans died there also. They were also in the 64th, as was your Mr. Goldsmith.
TG
Comment by Sallie on May 5, 2009 at 12:46am
Thanks TG
Comment by terrell garren on May 4, 2009 at 4:30pm
Sallie,

I have volume XIV of NC Troops here at my library. George Whitfield Morgan appears on page 510. No, he was not killed while AWOL. I can say that with reasonable certainty because from reading the record it is clear that he was returned to duty and promoted to Lieutenant after the AWOL notation. He was probably not AWOL at all, sometimes that comment was written in the record becasue the logging officer did not know where he was. Apparently he was on some sort of "detach" or "detachment duty." He was later assigned to the 7th Cavalry and as a Lieutenant. Then the record indicates that he "Previously served as a 2nd Lieutenant in 108th Regiment N. C. Militia." The full name should read NC militia for Home Defense. These units are often refered to as "home guard." It's pretty clear to me that he was on duty after the AWOL comment was written in the record. My guess is that he was killed at the Battle of Swannanoa Gap or when the Union Army raided and sacked Asheville on April 26, 1865. He was probably at the Battle of Swannanoa Gap due to his late assignments. Since he was an officer at the end of the war he may have been assassinated by the various "hit" squads that operated in the area at the end of the war. They were paid by Union operatives and most of them were Confederate deserters who knew the area. They targeted Confederate officers. Captain Balis Edney in Henderson County and Colonel William Walker in Cherokee County are the two best known victims of this type of warfare. We may find out more about him when the state finishes the last volume of NC Troops. It is supposed to include the "Milita" or "Home Guard," as well as the Junior and Senior Reserves. Union Soliders from NC are also to be included as I understand it. I expect it will be at least another year before it is completed.
Terrell Garren

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