Affiliated Networks


Forum

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Pack Library, downtown Asheville

August 9, 2017 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Nancy Werking Poling will read from her new book, Before It Was Legal: a black-white marriage (1945-1987).The Winters' forty-two-year marriage spanned key historical periods of the 20th century and took them from Indiana to Mexico City. Freed from U.S. racism, Daniel felt "as Mexican as chile verde." Meanwhile, Anna, a reserved white woman who struggled with speaking Spanish, experienced no similar sense of liberation. Before It Was Legal is not a happily-ever-after story, but an honest…See More
Jul 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 4
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 1
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 29
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 1
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness at City Lights Bookstore

July 28, 2017 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Linda Star Wolf will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, July 28th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her new book, Soul Whispering: The Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness.  Master Shamanic Breathwork Practitioner, Nita Gage co-wrote the book with Linda Star Wolf. The authors explore how the art of Soul Whispering can help each of us understand why we experience our lives the way we do and shift from healing our wounds to embracing the process of transformation. This is a powerful new…See More
May 27
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
May 23
Mirra updated an event
Thumbnail

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 20
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11

Gravity Fed Spring Water In Appalachia


Water-sometimes we take it for granted-the way it magically falls from our faucets or appears on store shelves we visit. For most folks living in the USA, water is easily accessible-even during times of drought.

Throughout the world's history people have used different methods of attaining and using water-from the elaborate schemes of the Romans to present day filtration systems which insure we drink only the purest cleanest water.

In Appalachia today, people generally have wells or get their water from local municipalities. In days gone by, most Appalachians used springs to meet their water needs.


Homes were built in the vicinity of a spring as water had to be carried to the house. To aid in the usefulness of springs-troughs were sometimes used to bring the water straight into the house or yard. Pap can recall folks channeling spring water to their yard or even straight into the kitchen. This was fairly easy to facilitate if gravity was on your side. (Gristmills often used the water chute/trough method to carry water from a nearby creek to turn the millstone to grind corn.)

With the passage of time man invented black rolled pipe. After the pipe became widespread (in our area it was during the mid 1960s), folks begin to use the pipe to carry water from the spring. Since pipe was easier to use and greatly increased the distance water could be carried-the choice of which spring to use could be widened to ensure gravity was indeed on your side.

I was around 3 or 4 years old when Pap built our house-which had gravity water. The spring Pap used was about a half a mile above the house. Pap dug out the spring (a spring used previously by his Grandfather Bird) placed the end of the black pipe in the water, weighted it with rocks, put a screen over the end to keep out trash; ran the pipe along the ground-buried in places-back to our house where it connected with the water system. The fall of gravity along the pipe kept it filled with water-when you turned on the tap viola-water!


Our gravity water was the best tasting water ever-however, there were downsides to it. The biggest aggravation was it's tendency to freeze in the winter. While Pap, buried much of the pipe there was no way he could bury every inch of it-some of it ran along the side of the creek where the ground is literally solid rock. Freezing temps overnight wouldn't freeze the water-but a real cold snap lasting several days was sure to freeze it. Pap would leave water running in one or two sinks at night to prevent freezing. But during harsh winters we often woke to no water-until Pap thawed it out. Pap would uncouple the links of pipe and try to blow out the ice-it often worked shooting solid round icicles from the end-Paul and I liked this part-the pieces seemed liked popsicles to us. If those attempts failed Pap would build fires along the pipe to warm it up-we liked playing in the fires too.

I was a young teenager when Pap had a well drilled. I remember him worrying-would the water taste as sweet as our spring water-would it be as cold and fresh? Pap was ecstatic when the well water tasted just as sweet, cold, and fresh as our gravity water-I suppose he was also pretty happy the days of unfreezing black pipe were over for him.

Many folks have pontificated on Appalachians and their great love for mountain water. Even going so far as to declare "water coming from steep mountain hollers is the only water fit to drink!" A good example of this comes from Horace Kephart's Our Southern Highlanders:

"The mountaineer takes the same pride in his water supply as the rich man in his wine cellar, and is in this respect a connoisseur. None but the purest and coldest of freestone will satisfy him."

Drop back by the Blind Pig in the following days to see me and the girls search for Pap's spring, go back in time with Pap and Uncle Henry as they reminisce about the spring of their youth, and enjoy an extra special post written by the Blind Pig's first guest writer.

What kind of water system did you grow up with?

Tipper

To read more about Appalachian Heritage visit the Blind Pig & The Acorn

Views: 1361

Comment

You need to be a member of The Read on WNC to add comments!

Join The Read on WNC

© 2017   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service