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City Lights Bookstore posted events
Saturday
Valerie Nieman posted a blog post

Mountain Words, Mountain Music

Appalachian poet, musician, and raconteur Kirk Judd has a new book and CD package out, "My People Was Music." I thought I'd share part of a Goodreads review I did of the book - I think members of The Read would enjoy this.There is no gussying-up here. This is the plain hard rock undergirding Appalachia. This is the sound of water rushing, the clawhammer banjo sound, the crack of a wedge as it splits that cross-grained stump of oak. Kirk Judd has been making poems for a long time, but like a…See More
Friday
Valerie Nieman posted an event
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Valerie Nieman at City Lights at City Lights Books

July 16, 2015 from 10:30am to 12pm
Coffee With the Poet - Valerie Nieman will read from and discuss her new poetry collection, "Hotel Worthy," poems of love, loss, and survival. See More
Friday
Gary Carter posted a blog post

New Story Published by Deep South Magazine: "Nothing But A House"

It's always an honor to have a new story selected and published, this time by Deep South Magazine -- which I recommend for its coverage of all things Southern and, in particular, its attention to Southern literary voices.Read the story here: "Nothing But A House" by Gary CarterComments are always welcome. Deep South Magazine actually has a unique comment section following each story.See More
Thursday
MARYROSE McWHIRTER updated their profile
Thursday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Thursday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Mar 24
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 21
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 18
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Monday's Lie by Jamie Mason

Asheville thriller writer Mason broods with the bestby Rob Neufeld             “Everything you need for measuring a person,” Dee Vess, the heroine and narrator of Jamie Mason’s novel, “Monday’s Lie,” reflects, “can be found in the nature of what he chooses to hide from everyone else.”            It’s a sign of how…See More
Mar 18
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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West End Poetry and Prose Reading Series March Reading at West End Bakery

March 14, 2015 from 7pm to 9pm
We are back for a new Spring session of our Poetry and Prose Reading Series! We hope you are able to join us again Saturday, March 14th, 7pm at the West End Bakery for a wonderful Free family-friendly evening of prose, poetry and storytelling from a group of fabulous local writers.This month we will be featuring: Tommy HaysCaroline Wilson Dalton Dayand Leah ShapiroHosted by Lockie Hunter and our friends at the West End Bakery Cathy Cleary and Krista Stearns.See More
Mar 11
Lockie Hunter posted photos
Mar 11
Sue Diehl posted an event
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William Forstchen discussing his Pillar to the Sky at Bell Library at Montreat College

March 24, 2015 from 3pm to 6pm
Dr. William Forstchen will be the guest author at the Montreat Community Book Club on March 24, 2015 at Bell Library, Montreat College at 3:00.  He will be discussing his novel Pillar to Sky Public is invited.See More
Mar 10
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Asheville Poetry Review 20th Anniversary Anthology--and event

Asheville Poetry Review produces 20-year anthologyby Rob Neufeld             The two most remarkable things about the Asheville Poetry Review have been its diversity and quality.  Yes, Asheville, you’ve got a poetry journal of special note here.            Now, 20 years after its locally born…See More
Mar 8
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Carolina McMullen Reading & Signing at City Lights Bookstore

March 14, 2015 from 3pm to 4:30pm
Carolina McMullen will read from her new novel Vicenta de Paul on Saturday, March 14th at 3:00 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore. As the first novel of her Not Here to Stay series, Vicenta de Paul tells of a baby who is abandoned by her young mother at an orphanage in Rota, Spain in 1914.  She is later adopted by a wealthy couple and raised in the peaceful coastal area of Rota, away from the busy city. Everything seems fine until her mother begins to suffer from depression.  Vicenta pulls through…See More
Mar 7
Patti Jensen posted an event

Murders, Moonshine & Mountaineers Book Discussion & Signing at The Market on Oak

March 21, 2015 from 11am to 12pm
The Market on Oak in Spruce Pine will host Allen Cook, author of Murders, Moonshine & Mountaineers: The Wildest County in America on Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 11A.M.Moonshine, Murder & Mountaineers recounts a time around the turn of the 19th century when moonshiners and desperadoes faced off against the law in epic battles that made national headlines. The book focuses on events from an area in western North Carolina that held the reputation as the wildest county in America (book has…See More
Mar 5

A recent comment left on the Blind Pig & the Acorn by B. Ruth got me to thinking about all the old folklore I've heard about the garden and about the outdoors in general.

  • Never plant vegetables that sound alike together. Think potato and tomato. (Pap told me that one)
  • Never say thank you if someone shares their flowers or plant cuttings with you-if you do the plant will die. (I've heard this one my whole life-and man is it hard not to automatically say thank you when someone gives you plants)
  • If you find a horse shoe-you should hang it in the nearest tree for good luck. (It's not as common to find horse shoes now-as it once was. I have found a few in the big garden-but I hung them on my porch instead of a tree)
  • Finding a 4 leaf clover is good luck. (My sister-n-law can walk outside and find a 4 leaf clover instantly-I don't think I've found more than 2 in my whole life)
  • To keep crows from bothering your garden, kill one and hang it nearby.
  • Trees that bloom twice in one year will have a bad crop. (Pap says he's seen June apples bloom twice more than once)
  • If you spit in your hands when cutting wood-you'll have good luck. (Pap said-the spit just helps you hold on better. Holding on to the ax always = good luck)
  • Don't plant your garden until the oak leaves are the size of mouse ears. (from B. Ruth)
  • Always plant your potatoes on Good Friday.
  • Plant your greenbeans on Good Friday.
  • Anything planted on the first day of Spring will live.
  • Bury nails around the roots of Hydrangea to make the blooms blue.

These last few are courtesy of Scott Nicholson:

  • Grass won't grow where human blood has been spilled.
  • Flowers which bloom out of season are evil. (I'm not sure why-but this one is my favorite)
  • Dreaming of thorns is bad luck.
  • Tomatoes should be planted on Memorial Day.
  • It's good luck to steal herbs. (what?)
  • A snowy winter portends a good year for crops. (most of the US should do well this year)
  • After planting a hill of beans, press the soil with your foot for good luck. (Pap always does this-who knew it was lucky-I always liked seeing his bootprints on top of all the mounds-somehow it seemed like the bootprints symbolized a job well done)
  • Planting peppers when your mad, makes the peppers grow hotter.
  • If 2 people's hoes hit together, they will work in the same field next year.

Makes me wonder who started the sayings and why. Have you heard any of these before? Do you have any to add?

Tipper

p.s. For other posts related to gardening in Western NC check out www.blindpigandtheacorn.com

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Tags: appalachia, folklore, garden, old-sayings

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