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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.



Latest Activity

Connie Regan-Blake updated an event

A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 21, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Saturday, April 21, 2018 at 7:30 pm, join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her "Taking the Stage" workshop participants, for an enchanting evening of storytelling in picturesque Black Mountain, NC. You'll enjoy a variety of stories and storytelling styles featuring tellers Jane O Cunningham from Rome, GA; Gabriele Marewski from Black Mountain, NC; Christine Phillips Westfeldt - Fairview,…See More
Glenda Council Beall posted a blog post

Writers Circle around the Table

We are located in Hayesville, NC. In April we begin our new season with outstanding Poet Mike James. Mike will read at Writers' Night Out in Blairsville, GA on Friday evening April 13. On Saturday, April 14, he will teach a class at my studio.Formally SpeakingThis class will focus on different types of traditional poetic forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, and the sestina, and will also include other verse forms such as erasures, found poems, prose poems, and last poems.Contact Glenda…See More
Mar 12
Caroline McIntyre posted an event

Rachel Carson, Silent Spring Chautauqua History Alive at UNC Asheville, OLLI Reuters Center, Manheimer Room

April 15, 2018 from 3pm to 4:30pm
Step inside the revolutionary book, Silent Spring as its author Rachel Carson reveals the reckless destruction of our living world. Written more than 55 years ago Silent Spring inspired the Environmental Movement and has never been out of print. And now you have a chance to ask the author, Rachel Carson, how this came to be. But these aren’t just performances. They’re a chance to step into Living History – to ask questions and go one on one with a women whose books shaped our country and our…See More
Mar 7
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted blog posts
Mar 7
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo

lexie on deck_edited-1

"She looks like I look in my imagination right before I've had my coffee ... relaxed, bothered (by something, anything) and fully aware that I'm almost, but not quite, the center of the universe ... a feeling that quickly fades after that…"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford replied to Kathryn Stripling Byer's discussion Mary Adams's new chapbook COMMANDMENT
"This is so perfect ... the thought of every woman, who KNOWS what the men are thinking!  But now at least we have an idea! This makes me happy in a sad, lovely sort of way!"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted a photo

Mom in Her Writing Nook ...

She was working on the "About the Authors" section of "Echoes Across the Blue Ridge" when I captured this one morning. Though you can't see it, her coffee cup was within gentle reach that morning. Roxie is at her feet.
Mar 4
Carolyn Bennett Fraiser updated their profile photo
Feb 15
Harold N. Stern updated their profile
Feb 6
Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

lexie on deck_edited-1

Lexie likes to sleep in the sunshine even on cold days.
Feb 6
Nancy Werking Poling posted a photo

Latest non-fiction book

In 1945 Indiana prohibited marriage between a white person and anyone with more than one-eighth "Negro blood." Yet Daniel (black) and Anna (white) gave up family, friends, and eventually even country to create a life together. Their 42-year marriage…
Feb 5
Nancy Werking Poling replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Bent Creek, the 4-part story
"Rob, Thanks for putting this into one document. I've been following the narrative in the Citizen-Times. I find it an added resource for my next writing project. In 1910 my husband's grandfather (1866-1947) showed up in Missouri and said…"
Feb 5
Rebecca L Caldwell updated their profile
Feb 5
Lee Ann Brown replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Writer Olive Dargan rises from obscurity
"Great Article!  Heart wrenching about her destroyed manuscripts and letters and notes but I will look for more of Olive Dargan!     Lee Ann Brown"
Feb 5
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Feb 4
Rap Monster posted a blog post


Focusing on the aftermath of the 2008 Financial Crisis, The Bang Bang Brokers tells the story of a hedge fund manager (based on a composite of real life traders) who got rich off of predicting the subprime fallout. His guilt and suicidal impulses lead him to a chance meeting with a Latino Gang, headed by small time weed dealer Ramon (Erik Michael Estrada). In hopes that Ramon will kill him in exchange for the favor, Rolley (played by Donihue) robs a rival Black Gang, earning the pair a ton of…See More
Feb 4


     Anna and I basically spent a month in Asheville, NC this summer. We returned to Georgia a few days ago, and while we were glad to get home, as we got out of the car, we were met with the suffocating heat that I still have not become acclimated to even though we have lived in Middle Georgia for over 30 years. Every plant in our backyard had dried up and only the belligerent squirrels had survived the summer’s inferno.

      We had a great time in Asheville. We visited our friends Jesse and Mary. We had a picnic at Dave Ballard’s farm. We went to Dollywood and made a quick trip to Morgantown, WV and Pittsburg. We took in a concert and Sliding Rock in Pisgah Forest. We enjoyed the Carter family reunion with all of Anna’s relatives, and, on my side of the family, had two wonderful meals with our McConnell cousins.

    We always enjoy having our children and grand children and in laws come to the mountains to visit. This year almost all of them were there and they seemed to enjoy themselves. We unexpectedly hosted our son in law, David Sams, and his’ brothers and their families when their family reunion in West Virginia was interrupted because of the terrible floods in Greenbrier County. The Sams clan is fun loving and were great to be with.

                One of the things we always like to do in Asheville is going to see the Asheville Tourists play ball. The Tourists are a class A farm team of the Colorado Rockies. I actually have been a Tourist fan since at least the 1960’s. My mother, before me, was also a baseball lover and she used to tell me stories of seeing Babe Ruth play exhibition games there when she was a girl. The ball park, McCormick Field, is one of the oldest parks in the nation and was renovated a few years ago. It is a great place to watch a baseball game. The park is nestled on a little plateau that sits high up on a hill just about a mile from downtown. The outfield fence separates the park from a sharply sloped wooded mountainside. Back in the day, the fence did not exist and a batter had to “make” his homeruns that he hit up into the embankment.

     Because flat land is limited in Asheville, McCormick Field is, in baseball vernacular, “cozy.” It is only about 300 feet down the right field line. They have a big, wooden wall on that side of the outfield that is an easy target for line drives. There is even a “Bull Durham” type target on the wall and if a batter hits it the crowd is rewarded with a prize of some sort. There is always silly but enjoyable entertainment between innings and the tee shirt gunman is an easy target for booing if a shirt doesn’t come your way.

”     On a cool clear evening under a dark blue sky, the field, lit by both the towering man made banks of halogen lights and the God made lights of a full moon and twinkling stars, may be the best place on earth to enjoy the national pastime. I always get a beer and a hotdog when I go. I tell Anna that somewhere in Bible it says you have to enjoy these traditional treats at every game.

     At one of the games this summer a strange thing happened. The batter hit a sharp ground ball into the hole between short and third. The third baseman tried to cut the ball off but couldn’t make the play. The shortstop played the ball from almost on the outfield grass and fired a bullet to first. The ball and the base runner arrived at first base at, what seemed to be, exactly the same time. The first base ump didn’t see it that way and called the runner out. 

                Almost as soon as the young base runner, who believed he had beaten the throw, crossed the bag and heard the out call he turned around and charged the ump. The first base coach jumped in to protect his player from the wrath of the equally young umpire. Suddenly out of the dugout roared the manager and before all of the hysterics were over the manager had been dispatched from the game. The crowd loved it. They cheered as their ejected leader fumed his way to the clubhouse.* Eventually, the game resumed. After all of the hubbub, the base runner was still out even though the ump probable got it wrong

                Why is this unusual? Well, since the advent of instant replay in Major League ball, this type of dustup that we were all familiar with, has disappeared from the game. Now after a close play, the runner returns quietly to the bag where he perches himself nonchalantly and carries on a friendly conversation with the opposing first baseman. The manager kills some time while one of his assistants determines whether or not to appeal the call. If he decides to appeal, three umpires gather in a huddle, someone puts on a set of headphones and, after what seems to be an eternity; someone in New York arbitrates the matter. In the mean time, the crowd has gone for concessions, and if you’re watching at home, it’s a good time for a bathroom break. Totally boring.  I don’t remember a manager being tossed this year on any major league game I have watched. 

                If there are any young fans of baseball left, they will never get to see the likes of Casey Stengel, Billy Martin, or Bobby Cox at their best. Chewing out the umpire, kicking dirt on the plate or hurling a ripped out base into the air like a Frisbee to make their point. The next night, all of the parties involved were friends again -until the next disputed call.

                We are not going back to the good old days in the Major Leagues. I know that. But maybe if the powers that be had to make the replay choice again, they would choose color over accuracy. No game is ever going to be called perfectly, but in striving for perfection, baseball has become so sterile that it really isn’t as much fun to watch as it used to be. Especially when your team is 30 games below .500 and will lose 100 games this year.

                If you are in a town with a minor league team this year, take in the game, I recommend it. The hotdogs are fresh, the beer is cheap, the seats are great, and you might actually get to see a real baseball game- even if the ump did miss the call.


  • For those of you who are sticklers for detail, the play describe above is almost true. It sort of happened the way I described it.



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