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Guide to Antebellum Flat Rock

"The introduction of my new publication, Guide to Antebellum Flat Rock will be launched on Sept 14 2019 at 1:30 PM at the Henderson County Court House 500 Main Street. A talk and a brief slide show follows with refreshments afterward. …"
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Flat Rock history via a road

Travelling back in time on a Flat Rock roadby Rob Neufeld             If you walk the one mile length of North Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, you step nearly 200 years into the past.            At the east end, the 21st century reigns.  Fronting six-lane Spartanburg Highway, a super-Ingles sits above a bog; and a CVS store faces an Octopus Garden smoke shop, a chiropractor, a cell phone provider, and a six-lane avenue to I-26 a mile away .            Neither Ingles nor CVS carries the big…See More
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Deborah Hall Daugherty
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At 8:22am on November 5, 2010, terrell garren said…
Hello Debroah,

Correcting the correction.

In fact there one of the Halls was in the 39th NC Inf. I missed him earlier because you have him as James "B." Hall and he is in the records as James "H. B." Hall. I don't know why they have the "H" and you did not?
TG
At 5:46pm on November 3, 2010, terrell garren said…
Hello Again Deborah,

I thought you might appreciate a few more details.

The capture of the Hall boys on Feb. 18, 1864 and the death of Merryman Hall was directly related to earlier events. The killing of Col. Walker and the attack against the Cherokee at Deep Creek Feb. 2, weakened Confederate defenses in WNC and the Union Army knewit. The attack on Deep Creek involved 1,100 men and three pieces of artillery. A raid with only 250 which resulted in your ancestors being captured, would not have been attempted a few months earlier. They feared the Cherokee to much to risk such a venture.

Your family is fortunate that any of them survived. About 25% of the men who went in Union prisons died there. I have identified 976 men from the 21 Westernmost North Carolina counties who died in Union prisons. Horrible.

If you would like to read up on this refer to North Carolina Troops, Volume XVI page 396 and 131.

Feel free to contact me directly at terrellgarren@bellsouth.net

Terrell
At 5:10pm on November 3, 2010, terrell garren said…
Hello Debrah,

I hope you will forgive me for correcting you on an important point. The Hall boys were never in the 39th NC Infantry Regiment. They were in Company B, Walker's Battalion, Thomas Legion. One or two of them may have been in the Indian Battalion for a short while.

You are absoulutely correct about what happened to them. Spies constantly kept the Union Army advised of when troops level were low. At the most advantageous times the Union Army would then lauch a cavalry raid against Cherokee County

. A raid was launched by Maj. Nathan W. Paine Commander of the 1st Wisconsin Cavalry with 250 men. The raid went up the Hiwassee River as far as Murphy. The raid was launched on February 17, 1864. They returned to Tennessee on February 18 with 33 prisoners. Undoubtedly, your Hall ancestors were among the 33 prisoners.

You may be pleased to know that they served with one of the most honorable officers in the Confederate Army, Lt. Col. William Clay Walker. A link to my speech about Walker can be found on the main page here.

I hope this is helpful.

Thank you.
Terrell Garren
 
 
 

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