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Phillip Elliott shared their photo on Facebook
Sep 5
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
Aug 28
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Little Switzerland Books and Beans

August 30, 2019 from 3pm to 6pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at Little Switzerland Books and Beans on Friday, August 30, from 3-5. A book signing will follow. Julia will read from her latest books A Neighborhood Changes, A Part of Me, and A Place That Was Home.See More
Aug 26
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Guide to Antebellum Flat Rock

"The introduction of my new publication, Guide to Antebellum Flat Rock will be launched on Sept 14 2019 at 1:30 PM at the Henderson County Court House 500 Main Street. A talk and a brief slide show follows with refreshments afterward. …"
Aug 23
Phillip Elliott posted photos
Aug 23
Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Black Mountain Library

June 15, 2019 from 3pm to 4pm
Can women rescue the planet from ecological disaster?Nancy Werking Poling will launch her new novel, WHILE EARTH STILL SPEAKS, set in WNC. She'll tell the stories behind the story: How did Mary (more crone than virgin) get into the narrative? And Mary Surratt, a co-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth?See More
Jun 10
Caroline McIntyre posted events
Apr 29
Rob Neufeld updated their profile
Apr 13
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Flat Rock history via a road

Travelling back in time on a Flat Rock roadby Rob Neufeld             If you walk the one mile length of North Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, you step nearly 200 years into the past.            At the east end, the 21st century reigns.  Fronting six-lane Spartanburg Highway, a super-Ingles sits above a bog; and a CVS store faces an Octopus Garden smoke shop, a chiropractor, a cell phone provider, and a six-lane avenue to I-26 a mile away .            Neither Ingles nor CVS carries the big…See More
Apr 8

   MANHATTAN BEACH

By Joe Perrone, Jr.

 

     I first saw Manhattan Beach as a youth,

With its old couples strolling the sand,

     Smiling faces advertising their love.

I watched as young mermaids,

     Waded bravely into the water,

Wearing oversized tee shirts turned inside out,

     To hide the names of high schools,

That everyone knew they went to, anyway.

 

     In the public lockers, men with brown faces,

Flashed gap-toothed smiles,

     And pushed their way beneath my shower,

While miniature replicas tripped over my feet,

     Unabashed in their zeal to join their fathers,

Who, when I protested, mouth agape,

     Generously offered to share their soap,

And bought a smile to my face, in spite of myself.

 

     Old men with waves of endless wrinkles,

Baked in the sun and leered jealously,

     At bronzed demigods with no wrinkles at all.

Children built glorious castles in the sand,

     And cried as they crumbled with the tide.

Then, as if lacking memory or common sense,

     Rebuilt them once again, it seemed,

Without the slightest worry or care.

 

     On the boardwalk, vendors with red faces and tired feet,

 Presented white smiles, punctuated by flashes of gold,

     As they peddled hot soda and cold knishes,

And wiped their greasy hands on off-white aprons,

     Saying “Thanking you, Mister” in broken English.

Then, inspired by their modest success,

     They pushed their clattering carts over the planks,

As orange and blue umbrellas snapped in the breeze.

 

     Yesterday, I saw Manhattan Beach as a man,

And was amused by its lack of stature,

     Reflecting how, as a kid from Brooklyn,

I had marveled at its magnitude.

     I walked along the edge of the ebbing sea,

Soothed my feet in the outgoing tide,

     And scanned the horizon for something familiar,

Instead I found some old sand castles—still intact.

 


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