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Rob Neufeld's 2 discussions were featured
Friday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Citizen science author in Asheville April 6

Eco author in Asheville April 6 Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson…See More
Friday
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
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Appalachian Authors Book Signing and Reading at Historic Carson House

April 8, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author and reader at the Appalachian Authors  Book Signing and Reading to be held at the Historic Carson House on Saturday, April 8 from 10-3. She will debut her new poetry collection A Part of Me. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.See More
Thursday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Wednesday
Gary Carden posted a video

2012 Award Winner for Literature -- Gary Neil Carden

A literature and drama teacher turned storyteller, Gary Neil Carden is an award winning playwright whose tales are informed by mountain life in North Carolin...
Wednesday
Gary Carden updated their profile
Wednesday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Stories of Asheville's homeless

History of Asheville’s homeless: humanity on trialby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Jim Parton and Kirk Faulkner, two homeless men at A-Hope, where Jim is getting help finding housing and Kirk is making job connections.  Photo, 2017, by Rob Neufeld.“I admire my daddy more than any other human on…See More
Mar 20
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Writers at Home at Malaprops at Malaprops

March 19, 2017 from 3pm to 5pm
A.K. Benninghofen, Lockie Hunter and Beth Keefauver will offer a free reading at the next installment of the Writers at Home series, presented by UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program (GSWP), at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 19, at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street in Asheville. This monthly series of free readings is hosted by GSWP director and novelist Tommy Hays.See More
Mar 19
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 18
Susan Weinberg posted an event

Reading by Poet Bianca Spriggs at Three Top Room, Plemmons Student Union, App State University

March 30, 2017 from 7:30pm to 8:45pm
A reading by poet, multi-genre artist, and core member of the Affrilachian Poets Bianca Spriggs in the Hughlene Bostian Frank Visiting Writers Series at Appalachian State. Spriggs will also present a craft talk from 12:30-1:45 in the Price Lake Room of the Plemmons Student Union. Free admission.For more info, see the press release http://www.news.appstate.edu/2017/03/06/bianca-spriggs/Parking info is at parking.appstate.edu.…See More
Mar 17
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 14
Toby Hill posted a blog post

Hester

HESTER      Growing up in Asheville,  N.C. in the 50’s and 60’s seemed, at the time, to be filled with a rhythm of adventure and strange encounters sprinkled with an assortment of particularly interesting and somewhat odd characters. One of those persons who fascinated me as a child was my father’s friend “Hester. “       My dad was about as straight an arrow as anyone could find. He seemed to a preadolescent, somewhat indolent son, frankly boring. Looking back from a perspective of 70 years, I…See More
Mar 11
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

African-American musicians in Asheville

African-American musicians flourished in Asheville neighborhoodsby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: The Outcasts, the state’s Battle of the Bands winner in 1979, included: (kneeling l to r) Edward Stout, saxophonist; Darriel Jones, drummer; (seated) Patricia McAfee, vocalist; (standing l to r) Marvin Seabrooks, trombonist; Mike…See More
Mar 11
Tipper posted a blog post

Blind Man's Bluff

According to the Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore, the game Blind Man's Bluff is as old as the 16th Century. It was a game I never liked playing as a kid. I was always afraid someone would get hurt-namely me! Its one of those games that makes grown-ups yell things like "Somebodys going to…See More
Mar 9
Mary-Chris Griffin shared Rob Neufeld's discussion on Facebook
Mar 6
Bob Plott replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Hunters and Plott hounds
"Thanks for sharing this Rob--and the book plug too. I have never seen this photo before. I have several others from the 1942 article, but this was a new one. The man on the truck looking down is WWII hero Little George Plott--who I profiled in my…"
Mar 6

Book discussion of The Missing by Tim Gautreaux. Book available now.

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Okay, I am a little over half-way through The Missing, and I don't want to finish it. this wonderful book is filled with sounds - music, river boat whistles and the awesome spectacle of over a thousand people dancing in the moonlight on the deck of a riverboat. Without a doubt, this book's greatest merit (and it has a bunch!) is atmosphere. From the battlefields of WWI to the sights, sounds and smells of a 1920's department store, you are there. With painstaking care,Tim Gautreaux gets it all right - the clothes, automobiles, the music and the lush (and still dangerous) wilderness of rural Mississippi.

All of this and a marvelous plot (and several sub-plots! ) The Missing has a kidnapped child; Sam, the guilt-ridden floorwalker in the department store who feels that his negligence of his responsibilities brought about the kidnapping; the tormented parents (who are musicians on a Mississippi riverboat), a bestial "hillbilly" family who orchestrated the kidnapping, dangerous dogs...oh, and the savage slaughter of Sam's family some twenty-six years ago - a crime that also demands justice from Sam, the ex-floorwalker - all of this packed in a novel that fairly pulses with energy,suspense and riverboat jazz. I need to go finish this book..........
I enjoyed this book very much also, and it's interesting how much you can love a book and, at the same time, be disappointed by one aspect of it. It's no small criticism that Gautreaux's philosophy drives the plot--and I like his philosophy. Novels that begin to have lives of their own, separate from the author's wishes, are the most exciting. As thrilling and colorful as The Missing is, I predicted every major development.

Except for one, but that's another topic.

Right now, I'd like to talk about two of the many things to appreciate in The Missing--the language and the storytelling. A man wrote me wondering why book reviewers didn't talk about language more. Yikes, he's right. Everyone loves language.

So here goes. Also, it's fun to point out passages in books that are our favorites.

Gautreaux knows exactly what he's doing. There are sentences in the novel that explain his method. One is in the first chapter. The hero, Sam Simoneaux, has just spent his first few days in Argonne, France, cleaning up unexploded armaments just after the end of World War I. A conversation with a hometown soldier causes him to think of experiences back home. Gautreaux writes: "The details of stories he'd heard whispered around him since infancy formed a whole mural in his mind."

Gautreaux then launches into an amazing tale that is re-tellable. It serves as an example of the legacy of "stories whispered" that create "a mural." I'd like to talk about Gautreaux's story-telling style, which includes a distinctive use of language. Next time. Now I'm gonna sit back a little.
Although I have reviewed this book for the Smoky Mountain News, I think I would like to talk about another aspect of The Missing that I didn't discuss in the review. Novelists are frequently called "storytellers" without justification since I feel that the term denotes a special quality that some novelists share with oral storytellers. Gautreaux has that marvelous talent, and like Scheherazade, one story engenders another. the story of a wounded child in an abandoned village in France presages another child...one that is kidnapped from a department store in New Orleans. Both of these endangered children share a special bond with their rescuer, Lucky, who was also a child snatched from almost certain death by his doomed father. For me, all of these abandoned children have much in common with those prototypes in fairy tales...Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, the Ugly Duckling - all fragile vessels who are saved by a vigilant guardian. I also feel that, like The Arabian Nights Gautreaux' tale has a "never-ending" quality...especially since The Missing has a "circular" construction, ending up where it begun.

I'm sure that critics can (with justification) find flaws in The Missing such as those instances in which the novel's suspenseful plot progresses by asking the reader to "willingly suspend disbelief" regarding the credibility of Lucky's motivation. For example, his decision to accept employment on a riverboat in the hope of finding the kidnappers (who probably saw this child sing and dance with her parents at one of the riverboat stops). Yeah, that is a stretch, but I came to feel that Gautreaux' plot, like the derelict riverboat on which much of the action takes place, could collapse with a bit of rude prodding in its weak spots; but given a bit of indulgence, it not only floats, it begins to emit a magical mix of music, moonlight and excitement.
Gary, could you quote a passage that exemplifies what you're talking about it? I have some I'd like to post to illustrate the novel's richness, which represents storytelling at its best. It will be fun to collect such examples from different books.

The plot flaws that I'm talking about don't have to do with just implausibilities. They have to do with much more significant things--in fact, things that show that, while passages may exhibit great natural storytelling, over all, the book is just the opposite--something very tightly constructed.

Gautreaux has his characters speak the philosophies that guide the plot.

Regarding the people who killed Sam's family, Uncle Claude says, "Sin is its own punishment...What they did is who they are. It makes them cripples." And, sure enough, when Sam finally catches up with the evil Cloats, they have all died or are dying of some kind of rot--literally in some cases--syphilis. Oh, we wish evil people died of their own sin! Does anybody have stories to confirm or contradict this world view? Do bad guys get just desserts?

(I have a few other examples of major plot manipulation. I'm not just picking on one thing.)

Then there is the thematic construction. Because Gautreaux's big theme has to do with the "fall from childhood" that all people experience, every time you meet a new character, he or she volunteers a story along these lines. I'm fine with the major examples: the French girl in Argonnes; Sam's own childhood; the loss of his first son to fever; and, of course, the missing girl. But it isn't an organic story when every character--the kidnappers' employers' cook; the boat engineers; the employees at the bank where Sam works for a short while; etc.--lines up.

Then there's the issue of character development. Sam is the victim of major traumas, and Gautreaux represents his psychology well. Halfway through the book, Sam begins to falter in alarming ways, freezing when he should act. This was very exciting to me as a reader. But then, the healing that Sam does is based on mostly symbolic occurrences--nowhere near enough suffering or struggle to mark his transformation. His final confrontation with the Cloats is unsatisfying, and even a little ridiculous, I think.

I think Gautreaux should follow Gary's lead. Scheherazade didn't need to come full circle or show character transformation. She just told great stories. Gautreaux is a fantastic storyteller. He needs to leave his tough guy sentimental philosophy out of the mix.
Well, I do agree that there is something disturbing about Lucky's inability to "take action." He is like a form of conscientious objector who, for some reason, can't physically act. Does he have moral qualms about it? He interferes reluctantly. Yet, he acts on the steamboat where he is a kind of bouncer, subduing trouble-makers, disarming drunks, breaking up fights.....but in the issues that touch him personally, he freezes. (He also makes a lousy bank guard.) He is a "watcher" or observer. When it comes time for him to avenge the massacre of his family, he finally seems primed, but then action becomes irrelevant since the Cloats are in the act of dying anyway. I don't know that I found him lacking in courage, but he does seem to imitate Hamlet since he "loses the name of action." He frequently has to be goaded or shamed into doing what needs to be done as exemplified by his badgering friend on the steamboat and his wife who is angry by his inability to "do the right thing."

I have trouble quoting passages from the book since I read The Missing on my Kindle ....which illustrates another reason to stick with "real books."
P. S. As for becoming enthralled by Gautreaux' "romanticism" (and Cormac McCarthy's, as well!), I plead guilty. I'm not sure what "romanaticism" means in this context, but when the topic touches on Cormac McCarthy, I lose all rational perception and admit to being a fanatical (and unquestioning) disciple.

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