Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

Spellbound posted an event
Thumbnail

Lyndsay Eli with GUNSLINGER GIRL (YA Novel) at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

January 20, 2018 from 6pm to 7pm
Are you a fan of The Hunger Games?  Then picture what Katniss would be like - with a gun.  That's just a taste of the "new" West action Lyndsay Eli brings to Spellbound Children's Bookshop with Gunslinger Girl.  She shares her debut novel on Saturday, January 20, at 6 p.m. The US has been fractured by a Second Civil War. Serendipity 'Pity' Jones finds a home of sorts in the corrupt, lawless city of Cessation (think Las Vegas on steroids).  Her shooting skills make her a star of the Theater…See More
20 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Cherokee and WNC music and dance events

Two Big Cultural Events in December in Hendersonville & Ashevillefrom press releaseThe Center for Cultural Preservation, WNC’s cultural history and documentary film center, presents, Cherokee Music and Dance on Thursday, December 7, 7 p.m., Blue Ridge Community College’s Thomas Auditorium.  Tickets are $5. The screening of A Great American Tapestry will be held on December 2, 2 p.m., at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville.  Tickets for that event are…See More
Wednesday
Spellbound posted events
Nov 9
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Battery Park Hill through the ages

Battery Park through the Years by Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTIONS: 1) Present-day view of Battery Park Apartments from…See More
Nov 6
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post
Oct 13
Rob Neufeld's discussion was featured

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Dave Minneman and a sense of justiceby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Dave Minneman doing research at Pack Memorial Library.  Photo by author.            “One of the biggest things I did as a kid, in order to escape my father,” Asheville resident Dave Minneman says of his 1960s and 70s rural Indiana childhood, “was…See More
Oct 8
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at MACA Authors' Booth

October 14, 2017 from 9:30am to 1:30pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be signing her new books A Part of Me and A Place That Was Home at the Mountain Glory Festival in downtown Marion on Saturday, October 14, from 9:30-1:30. She will be located at the MACA Authors' booth on Main Street.See More
Oct 7
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Sample 8 Great Smokies Writers at Malaprop’s, Oct. 15

Writers in UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program (GSWP)read atMalaprop's Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville, 3 p.m., Sun.,Oct. 15 Elizabeth Lutyens, editor of the GSWP’s Great Smokies Review, leads the Prose Master Class and will host the reading. ·        Ellen Carr, who works in the financial industry, will read excerpts from her novel of uneasy relationships, Unmanned. ·        Sarah Carter, an artist and photographer who will publish an excerpt of her novel, Jolene, Joe-Pye,…See More
Oct 6
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

The Douglas Ellington effect: An Appreciationby Rob NeufeldIMAGE: Douglas Ellington’s original drawing for a City Hall-County Courthouse Art Deco complex.            “Dear Douglas,” Kenneth Ellington wrote his brother, the 38-year old Pittsburgh architect, on May 6, 1925, “I know things are…See More
Oct 6
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

How To Kill Your Reader

Danger is a crucial element in a mystery novel. A killer is on the loose and no one is safe. But sometimes the killer can be the writer, and the victim, the reader.I'm talking about when the author turns into a preacher and the story becomes a sermon. Now I am not against using a mystery novel for social commentary. Writing doesn't happen in a moral vacuum, and, after all, isn't a mystery a morality play? As fellow North Carolina author Margaret Maron said there is no topic that can't be dealt…See More
Oct 5
Mark de Castrique posted a video

Hidden Scars - A Sam Blackman Mystery

Sam Blackman and Nakayla Robertson investigate a 70-year-old death that unleashes a killer.
Oct 3
Mark de Castrique posted a discussion

Black Mountain College as Backdrop for Mystery

My new book, HIDDEN SCARS, is released Oct 3rd.  D.G. Martin notes the star of the story is Black Mountain College.  http://chapelboro.com/town-square/columns/one-on-one/one-one-lost-college-still-shinesSee More
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Upcoming book--Sacred Sites for Secular Times

Sacred Sites for Secular Times: 50 Commemorative Experiences in Western North Carolina by Rob Neufeld              Among the many sites dedicated to history, there are some—both overbooked and overlooked—that provide full and moving experiences.  They involve a physical component, connecting to landscape; an imaginative one, entering other times and minds; and an interactive one, maintaining relevance.             The entries in this book help create full experiences through descriptive…See More
Sep 25
Susan Weinberg posted events
Sep 22
Susan Weinberg shared their event on Facebook
Sep 22
Susan Weinberg shared their event on Facebook
Sep 22

Book discussion of The Missing by Tim Gautreaux. Book available now.

Views: 290

Replies to This Discussion

Okay, I am a little over half-way through The Missing, and I don't want to finish it. this wonderful book is filled with sounds - music, river boat whistles and the awesome spectacle of over a thousand people dancing in the moonlight on the deck of a riverboat. Without a doubt, this book's greatest merit (and it has a bunch!) is atmosphere. From the battlefields of WWI to the sights, sounds and smells of a 1920's department store, you are there. With painstaking care,Tim Gautreaux gets it all right - the clothes, automobiles, the music and the lush (and still dangerous) wilderness of rural Mississippi.

All of this and a marvelous plot (and several sub-plots! ) The Missing has a kidnapped child; Sam, the guilt-ridden floorwalker in the department store who feels that his negligence of his responsibilities brought about the kidnapping; the tormented parents (who are musicians on a Mississippi riverboat), a bestial "hillbilly" family who orchestrated the kidnapping, dangerous dogs...oh, and the savage slaughter of Sam's family some twenty-six years ago - a crime that also demands justice from Sam, the ex-floorwalker - all of this packed in a novel that fairly pulses with energy,suspense and riverboat jazz. I need to go finish this book..........
I enjoyed this book very much also, and it's interesting how much you can love a book and, at the same time, be disappointed by one aspect of it. It's no small criticism that Gautreaux's philosophy drives the plot--and I like his philosophy. Novels that begin to have lives of their own, separate from the author's wishes, are the most exciting. As thrilling and colorful as The Missing is, I predicted every major development.

Except for one, but that's another topic.

Right now, I'd like to talk about two of the many things to appreciate in The Missing--the language and the storytelling. A man wrote me wondering why book reviewers didn't talk about language more. Yikes, he's right. Everyone loves language.

So here goes. Also, it's fun to point out passages in books that are our favorites.

Gautreaux knows exactly what he's doing. There are sentences in the novel that explain his method. One is in the first chapter. The hero, Sam Simoneaux, has just spent his first few days in Argonne, France, cleaning up unexploded armaments just after the end of World War I. A conversation with a hometown soldier causes him to think of experiences back home. Gautreaux writes: "The details of stories he'd heard whispered around him since infancy formed a whole mural in his mind."

Gautreaux then launches into an amazing tale that is re-tellable. It serves as an example of the legacy of "stories whispered" that create "a mural." I'd like to talk about Gautreaux's story-telling style, which includes a distinctive use of language. Next time. Now I'm gonna sit back a little.
Although I have reviewed this book for the Smoky Mountain News, I think I would like to talk about another aspect of The Missing that I didn't discuss in the review. Novelists are frequently called "storytellers" without justification since I feel that the term denotes a special quality that some novelists share with oral storytellers. Gautreaux has that marvelous talent, and like Scheherazade, one story engenders another. the story of a wounded child in an abandoned village in France presages another child...one that is kidnapped from a department store in New Orleans. Both of these endangered children share a special bond with their rescuer, Lucky, who was also a child snatched from almost certain death by his doomed father. For me, all of these abandoned children have much in common with those prototypes in fairy tales...Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, the Ugly Duckling - all fragile vessels who are saved by a vigilant guardian. I also feel that, like The Arabian Nights Gautreaux' tale has a "never-ending" quality...especially since The Missing has a "circular" construction, ending up where it begun.

I'm sure that critics can (with justification) find flaws in The Missing such as those instances in which the novel's suspenseful plot progresses by asking the reader to "willingly suspend disbelief" regarding the credibility of Lucky's motivation. For example, his decision to accept employment on a riverboat in the hope of finding the kidnappers (who probably saw this child sing and dance with her parents at one of the riverboat stops). Yeah, that is a stretch, but I came to feel that Gautreaux' plot, like the derelict riverboat on which much of the action takes place, could collapse with a bit of rude prodding in its weak spots; but given a bit of indulgence, it not only floats, it begins to emit a magical mix of music, moonlight and excitement.
Gary, could you quote a passage that exemplifies what you're talking about it? I have some I'd like to post to illustrate the novel's richness, which represents storytelling at its best. It will be fun to collect such examples from different books.

The plot flaws that I'm talking about don't have to do with just implausibilities. They have to do with much more significant things--in fact, things that show that, while passages may exhibit great natural storytelling, over all, the book is just the opposite--something very tightly constructed.

Gautreaux has his characters speak the philosophies that guide the plot.

Regarding the people who killed Sam's family, Uncle Claude says, "Sin is its own punishment...What they did is who they are. It makes them cripples." And, sure enough, when Sam finally catches up with the evil Cloats, they have all died or are dying of some kind of rot--literally in some cases--syphilis. Oh, we wish evil people died of their own sin! Does anybody have stories to confirm or contradict this world view? Do bad guys get just desserts?

(I have a few other examples of major plot manipulation. I'm not just picking on one thing.)

Then there is the thematic construction. Because Gautreaux's big theme has to do with the "fall from childhood" that all people experience, every time you meet a new character, he or she volunteers a story along these lines. I'm fine with the major examples: the French girl in Argonnes; Sam's own childhood; the loss of his first son to fever; and, of course, the missing girl. But it isn't an organic story when every character--the kidnappers' employers' cook; the boat engineers; the employees at the bank where Sam works for a short while; etc.--lines up.

Then there's the issue of character development. Sam is the victim of major traumas, and Gautreaux represents his psychology well. Halfway through the book, Sam begins to falter in alarming ways, freezing when he should act. This was very exciting to me as a reader. But then, the healing that Sam does is based on mostly symbolic occurrences--nowhere near enough suffering or struggle to mark his transformation. His final confrontation with the Cloats is unsatisfying, and even a little ridiculous, I think.

I think Gautreaux should follow Gary's lead. Scheherazade didn't need to come full circle or show character transformation. She just told great stories. Gautreaux is a fantastic storyteller. He needs to leave his tough guy sentimental philosophy out of the mix.
Well, I do agree that there is something disturbing about Lucky's inability to "take action." He is like a form of conscientious objector who, for some reason, can't physically act. Does he have moral qualms about it? He interferes reluctantly. Yet, he acts on the steamboat where he is a kind of bouncer, subduing trouble-makers, disarming drunks, breaking up fights.....but in the issues that touch him personally, he freezes. (He also makes a lousy bank guard.) He is a "watcher" or observer. When it comes time for him to avenge the massacre of his family, he finally seems primed, but then action becomes irrelevant since the Cloats are in the act of dying anyway. I don't know that I found him lacking in courage, but he does seem to imitate Hamlet since he "loses the name of action." He frequently has to be goaded or shamed into doing what needs to be done as exemplified by his badgering friend on the steamboat and his wife who is angry by his inability to "do the right thing."

I have trouble quoting passages from the book since I read The Missing on my Kindle ....which illustrates another reason to stick with "real books."
P. S. As for becoming enthralled by Gautreaux' "romanticism" (and Cormac McCarthy's, as well!), I plead guilty. I'm not sure what "romanaticism" means in this context, but when the topic touches on Cormac McCarthy, I lose all rational perception and admit to being a fanatical (and unquestioning) disciple.

RSS

© 2017   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service