Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness at City Lights Bookstore

July 28, 2017 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Linda Star Wolf will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, July 28th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her new book, Soul Whispering: The Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness.  Master Shamanic Breathwork Practitioner, Nita Gage co-wrote the book with Linda Star Wolf. The authors explore how the art of Soul Whispering can help each of us understand why we experience our lives the way we do and shift from healing our wounds to embracing the process of transformation. This is a powerful new…See More
yesterday
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
Tuesday
Mirra updated an event
Thumbnail

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 20
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
Thumbnail

Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
Thumbnail

Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

How to make a monument Waynesville style

For a monument in a parking lotHow might an artist portray a Plott?The Forga family owns the only downtown parking lot in Hazelwood and wants a statue of a Plott Hound, the N.C. State Dog, put at its center in honor of the late Robert Forga and his wife, Viola.   The family engaged the Waynesville Public Art Commission to find an artist, and now the decision’s down to three There’s a N.C. Highway Historical Marker about the Plott Hound at Hazelwood Elementary School in Waynesville.  The dog’s…See More
May 5
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at MACA Gift Shop

May 6, 2017 from 9am to 11:30am
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her latest books "A Part of Me" and "A Place That Was Home" on Saturday, May 6, from 9-11:30 at the MACA gift shop in downtown Marion.See More
May 3
Short-short Stories & Riddles shared their blog post on Facebook
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much Mickey MantlePete HillRocky ColavitoDusty BakerCurt FloodMickey RiversCory Snyder List of baseball outfielders with names that have to do with layers of the earth, in order of sports greatness.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

A riddle

Tying shoelaces,Lifting a mug by its handle,Lifting something that requires all fingers,Pressing down hard while writing,Shaking hands:Things hindered by a bruised forefinger. I would have had more things to record, but unfortunately my finger healed too quickly.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
Apr 30

Book discussion of The Missing by Tim Gautreaux. Book available now.

Views: 278

Replies to This Discussion

Okay, I am a little over half-way through The Missing, and I don't want to finish it. this wonderful book is filled with sounds - music, river boat whistles and the awesome spectacle of over a thousand people dancing in the moonlight on the deck of a riverboat. Without a doubt, this book's greatest merit (and it has a bunch!) is atmosphere. From the battlefields of WWI to the sights, sounds and smells of a 1920's department store, you are there. With painstaking care,Tim Gautreaux gets it all right - the clothes, automobiles, the music and the lush (and still dangerous) wilderness of rural Mississippi.

All of this and a marvelous plot (and several sub-plots! ) The Missing has a kidnapped child; Sam, the guilt-ridden floorwalker in the department store who feels that his negligence of his responsibilities brought about the kidnapping; the tormented parents (who are musicians on a Mississippi riverboat), a bestial "hillbilly" family who orchestrated the kidnapping, dangerous dogs...oh, and the savage slaughter of Sam's family some twenty-six years ago - a crime that also demands justice from Sam, the ex-floorwalker - all of this packed in a novel that fairly pulses with energy,suspense and riverboat jazz. I need to go finish this book..........
I enjoyed this book very much also, and it's interesting how much you can love a book and, at the same time, be disappointed by one aspect of it. It's no small criticism that Gautreaux's philosophy drives the plot--and I like his philosophy. Novels that begin to have lives of their own, separate from the author's wishes, are the most exciting. As thrilling and colorful as The Missing is, I predicted every major development.

Except for one, but that's another topic.

Right now, I'd like to talk about two of the many things to appreciate in The Missing--the language and the storytelling. A man wrote me wondering why book reviewers didn't talk about language more. Yikes, he's right. Everyone loves language.

So here goes. Also, it's fun to point out passages in books that are our favorites.

Gautreaux knows exactly what he's doing. There are sentences in the novel that explain his method. One is in the first chapter. The hero, Sam Simoneaux, has just spent his first few days in Argonne, France, cleaning up unexploded armaments just after the end of World War I. A conversation with a hometown soldier causes him to think of experiences back home. Gautreaux writes: "The details of stories he'd heard whispered around him since infancy formed a whole mural in his mind."

Gautreaux then launches into an amazing tale that is re-tellable. It serves as an example of the legacy of "stories whispered" that create "a mural." I'd like to talk about Gautreaux's story-telling style, which includes a distinctive use of language. Next time. Now I'm gonna sit back a little.
Although I have reviewed this book for the Smoky Mountain News, I think I would like to talk about another aspect of The Missing that I didn't discuss in the review. Novelists are frequently called "storytellers" without justification since I feel that the term denotes a special quality that some novelists share with oral storytellers. Gautreaux has that marvelous talent, and like Scheherazade, one story engenders another. the story of a wounded child in an abandoned village in France presages another child...one that is kidnapped from a department store in New Orleans. Both of these endangered children share a special bond with their rescuer, Lucky, who was also a child snatched from almost certain death by his doomed father. For me, all of these abandoned children have much in common with those prototypes in fairy tales...Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, the Ugly Duckling - all fragile vessels who are saved by a vigilant guardian. I also feel that, like The Arabian Nights Gautreaux' tale has a "never-ending" quality...especially since The Missing has a "circular" construction, ending up where it begun.

I'm sure that critics can (with justification) find flaws in The Missing such as those instances in which the novel's suspenseful plot progresses by asking the reader to "willingly suspend disbelief" regarding the credibility of Lucky's motivation. For example, his decision to accept employment on a riverboat in the hope of finding the kidnappers (who probably saw this child sing and dance with her parents at one of the riverboat stops). Yeah, that is a stretch, but I came to feel that Gautreaux' plot, like the derelict riverboat on which much of the action takes place, could collapse with a bit of rude prodding in its weak spots; but given a bit of indulgence, it not only floats, it begins to emit a magical mix of music, moonlight and excitement.
Gary, could you quote a passage that exemplifies what you're talking about it? I have some I'd like to post to illustrate the novel's richness, which represents storytelling at its best. It will be fun to collect such examples from different books.

The plot flaws that I'm talking about don't have to do with just implausibilities. They have to do with much more significant things--in fact, things that show that, while passages may exhibit great natural storytelling, over all, the book is just the opposite--something very tightly constructed.

Gautreaux has his characters speak the philosophies that guide the plot.

Regarding the people who killed Sam's family, Uncle Claude says, "Sin is its own punishment...What they did is who they are. It makes them cripples." And, sure enough, when Sam finally catches up with the evil Cloats, they have all died or are dying of some kind of rot--literally in some cases--syphilis. Oh, we wish evil people died of their own sin! Does anybody have stories to confirm or contradict this world view? Do bad guys get just desserts?

(I have a few other examples of major plot manipulation. I'm not just picking on one thing.)

Then there is the thematic construction. Because Gautreaux's big theme has to do with the "fall from childhood" that all people experience, every time you meet a new character, he or she volunteers a story along these lines. I'm fine with the major examples: the French girl in Argonnes; Sam's own childhood; the loss of his first son to fever; and, of course, the missing girl. But it isn't an organic story when every character--the kidnappers' employers' cook; the boat engineers; the employees at the bank where Sam works for a short while; etc.--lines up.

Then there's the issue of character development. Sam is the victim of major traumas, and Gautreaux represents his psychology well. Halfway through the book, Sam begins to falter in alarming ways, freezing when he should act. This was very exciting to me as a reader. But then, the healing that Sam does is based on mostly symbolic occurrences--nowhere near enough suffering or struggle to mark his transformation. His final confrontation with the Cloats is unsatisfying, and even a little ridiculous, I think.

I think Gautreaux should follow Gary's lead. Scheherazade didn't need to come full circle or show character transformation. She just told great stories. Gautreaux is a fantastic storyteller. He needs to leave his tough guy sentimental philosophy out of the mix.
Well, I do agree that there is something disturbing about Lucky's inability to "take action." He is like a form of conscientious objector who, for some reason, can't physically act. Does he have moral qualms about it? He interferes reluctantly. Yet, he acts on the steamboat where he is a kind of bouncer, subduing trouble-makers, disarming drunks, breaking up fights.....but in the issues that touch him personally, he freezes. (He also makes a lousy bank guard.) He is a "watcher" or observer. When it comes time for him to avenge the massacre of his family, he finally seems primed, but then action becomes irrelevant since the Cloats are in the act of dying anyway. I don't know that I found him lacking in courage, but he does seem to imitate Hamlet since he "loses the name of action." He frequently has to be goaded or shamed into doing what needs to be done as exemplified by his badgering friend on the steamboat and his wife who is angry by his inability to "do the right thing."

I have trouble quoting passages from the book since I read The Missing on my Kindle ....which illustrates another reason to stick with "real books."
P. S. As for becoming enthralled by Gautreaux' "romanticism" (and Cormac McCarthy's, as well!), I plead guilty. I'm not sure what "romanaticism" means in this context, but when the topic touches on Cormac McCarthy, I lose all rational perception and admit to being a fanatical (and unquestioning) disciple.

RSS

© 2017   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service