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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Coalescence

Coalescence (part of  Living Poem)Intro Don’t listen, children, and do not hear.(A monster is coming and there’s no escapeWithin this story, and no good way to tell it, Except to gaze at the horror as at a flower,A disaster streaming off extremes it breedsEverywhere and in our minds, disabling our power.) Distractions are good, puzzles that teaseAnd please and fill the main scene, whichIncludes…See More
Tuesday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Sultan's Dream

The Sultan’s Dream (Part of Living Poem) When it comes to walking, the jig’s up.No more fit lad sitting at the pub.No more flim-flam smiling with a limp. See how the legs totter and the torso leans.Do you know what a lame sultan dreams?Of reclining on a divan wearing pantaloons, Comparing his plight to a mountaineer’sNegotiating an icy bluff in a fierce wind,And then lounging in a tent to unwind. Which…See More
Nov 15
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Tale of Ononis

The Tale of Ononis by Rob Neufeld Part 1: The Making of a Celebrity ❧  Hare Begins His Tale  Ononis was my region’s name.People now call it Never-the-same.I’ll start with the day a delivery came. The package I got was a devil’s dare,Swaddled and knotted in Swamp Bloat hairAnd bearing, in red, one word: “Beware!” Bloats are creatures from the Land of Mud Pies,Wallowing in waste with tightly closed eyesUntil fears bring tears and the bleary bloats rise.   ❧  Hare’s Colleagues  I asked my boss,…See More
Nov 9
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Drop Your Troubles: A Solo Storytelling Performance with Connie Regan-Blake at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

December 1, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join this internationally renowned storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she transforms a packed theater into an intimate circle of friends with old-timey charm, wisdom, and humor. We’ll also welcome the Singer of  Stories, Donna Marie Todd, who will perform her original story, “The Amazing Zicafoose Sisters.” Connie’s last two shows at BMCA have sold…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story and Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story & Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” The event will be hosted by the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, just a short drive from Asheville nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding the area. Call the Center for advance tickets (828) 669-0930 or order…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive, affirming…See More
Oct 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Oct 17
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

First Drumbeat

First Drumbeat(Part of Living Poem) The time has come.Call it a drum,Or a crumb,What’s left of life. I used to tell a jokeWhen my life was wide,And I was a stud,And not a dud—I knowI’m not a dud.  I’m a dude,A dad.  But everyone mustRebut the dud chargeAt summing up time. Oh yeah, the joke,A trademark one for meIn that it’s not funny. I used to say I’ll never retireFrom writingBecause if I’m ever…See More
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks for the prompt, Joan!  I have attached the whole work in progress as a doc at the bottom of the table of contents page: http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/special/living-poem"
Sep 22
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Is there a way from this website to print everything or might you send me such a document to bayjh@icloud.com?"
Sep 22

Book discussion of The Missing by Tim Gautreaux. Book available now.

Views: 325

Replies to This Discussion

Okay, I am a little over half-way through The Missing, and I don't want to finish it. this wonderful book is filled with sounds - music, river boat whistles and the awesome spectacle of over a thousand people dancing in the moonlight on the deck of a riverboat. Without a doubt, this book's greatest merit (and it has a bunch!) is atmosphere. From the battlefields of WWI to the sights, sounds and smells of a 1920's department store, you are there. With painstaking care,Tim Gautreaux gets it all right - the clothes, automobiles, the music and the lush (and still dangerous) wilderness of rural Mississippi.

All of this and a marvelous plot (and several sub-plots! ) The Missing has a kidnapped child; Sam, the guilt-ridden floorwalker in the department store who feels that his negligence of his responsibilities brought about the kidnapping; the tormented parents (who are musicians on a Mississippi riverboat), a bestial "hillbilly" family who orchestrated the kidnapping, dangerous dogs...oh, and the savage slaughter of Sam's family some twenty-six years ago - a crime that also demands justice from Sam, the ex-floorwalker - all of this packed in a novel that fairly pulses with energy,suspense and riverboat jazz. I need to go finish this book..........
I enjoyed this book very much also, and it's interesting how much you can love a book and, at the same time, be disappointed by one aspect of it. It's no small criticism that Gautreaux's philosophy drives the plot--and I like his philosophy. Novels that begin to have lives of their own, separate from the author's wishes, are the most exciting. As thrilling and colorful as The Missing is, I predicted every major development.

Except for one, but that's another topic.

Right now, I'd like to talk about two of the many things to appreciate in The Missing--the language and the storytelling. A man wrote me wondering why book reviewers didn't talk about language more. Yikes, he's right. Everyone loves language.

So here goes. Also, it's fun to point out passages in books that are our favorites.

Gautreaux knows exactly what he's doing. There are sentences in the novel that explain his method. One is in the first chapter. The hero, Sam Simoneaux, has just spent his first few days in Argonne, France, cleaning up unexploded armaments just after the end of World War I. A conversation with a hometown soldier causes him to think of experiences back home. Gautreaux writes: "The details of stories he'd heard whispered around him since infancy formed a whole mural in his mind."

Gautreaux then launches into an amazing tale that is re-tellable. It serves as an example of the legacy of "stories whispered" that create "a mural." I'd like to talk about Gautreaux's story-telling style, which includes a distinctive use of language. Next time. Now I'm gonna sit back a little.
Although I have reviewed this book for the Smoky Mountain News, I think I would like to talk about another aspect of The Missing that I didn't discuss in the review. Novelists are frequently called "storytellers" without justification since I feel that the term denotes a special quality that some novelists share with oral storytellers. Gautreaux has that marvelous talent, and like Scheherazade, one story engenders another. the story of a wounded child in an abandoned village in France presages another child...one that is kidnapped from a department store in New Orleans. Both of these endangered children share a special bond with their rescuer, Lucky, who was also a child snatched from almost certain death by his doomed father. For me, all of these abandoned children have much in common with those prototypes in fairy tales...Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, the Ugly Duckling - all fragile vessels who are saved by a vigilant guardian. I also feel that, like The Arabian Nights Gautreaux' tale has a "never-ending" quality...especially since The Missing has a "circular" construction, ending up where it begun.

I'm sure that critics can (with justification) find flaws in The Missing such as those instances in which the novel's suspenseful plot progresses by asking the reader to "willingly suspend disbelief" regarding the credibility of Lucky's motivation. For example, his decision to accept employment on a riverboat in the hope of finding the kidnappers (who probably saw this child sing and dance with her parents at one of the riverboat stops). Yeah, that is a stretch, but I came to feel that Gautreaux' plot, like the derelict riverboat on which much of the action takes place, could collapse with a bit of rude prodding in its weak spots; but given a bit of indulgence, it not only floats, it begins to emit a magical mix of music, moonlight and excitement.
Gary, could you quote a passage that exemplifies what you're talking about it? I have some I'd like to post to illustrate the novel's richness, which represents storytelling at its best. It will be fun to collect such examples from different books.

The plot flaws that I'm talking about don't have to do with just implausibilities. They have to do with much more significant things--in fact, things that show that, while passages may exhibit great natural storytelling, over all, the book is just the opposite--something very tightly constructed.

Gautreaux has his characters speak the philosophies that guide the plot.

Regarding the people who killed Sam's family, Uncle Claude says, "Sin is its own punishment...What they did is who they are. It makes them cripples." And, sure enough, when Sam finally catches up with the evil Cloats, they have all died or are dying of some kind of rot--literally in some cases--syphilis. Oh, we wish evil people died of their own sin! Does anybody have stories to confirm or contradict this world view? Do bad guys get just desserts?

(I have a few other examples of major plot manipulation. I'm not just picking on one thing.)

Then there is the thematic construction. Because Gautreaux's big theme has to do with the "fall from childhood" that all people experience, every time you meet a new character, he or she volunteers a story along these lines. I'm fine with the major examples: the French girl in Argonnes; Sam's own childhood; the loss of his first son to fever; and, of course, the missing girl. But it isn't an organic story when every character--the kidnappers' employers' cook; the boat engineers; the employees at the bank where Sam works for a short while; etc.--lines up.

Then there's the issue of character development. Sam is the victim of major traumas, and Gautreaux represents his psychology well. Halfway through the book, Sam begins to falter in alarming ways, freezing when he should act. This was very exciting to me as a reader. But then, the healing that Sam does is based on mostly symbolic occurrences--nowhere near enough suffering or struggle to mark his transformation. His final confrontation with the Cloats is unsatisfying, and even a little ridiculous, I think.

I think Gautreaux should follow Gary's lead. Scheherazade didn't need to come full circle or show character transformation. She just told great stories. Gautreaux is a fantastic storyteller. He needs to leave his tough guy sentimental philosophy out of the mix.
Well, I do agree that there is something disturbing about Lucky's inability to "take action." He is like a form of conscientious objector who, for some reason, can't physically act. Does he have moral qualms about it? He interferes reluctantly. Yet, he acts on the steamboat where he is a kind of bouncer, subduing trouble-makers, disarming drunks, breaking up fights.....but in the issues that touch him personally, he freezes. (He also makes a lousy bank guard.) He is a "watcher" or observer. When it comes time for him to avenge the massacre of his family, he finally seems primed, but then action becomes irrelevant since the Cloats are in the act of dying anyway. I don't know that I found him lacking in courage, but he does seem to imitate Hamlet since he "loses the name of action." He frequently has to be goaded or shamed into doing what needs to be done as exemplified by his badgering friend on the steamboat and his wife who is angry by his inability to "do the right thing."

I have trouble quoting passages from the book since I read The Missing on my Kindle ....which illustrates another reason to stick with "real books."
P. S. As for becoming enthralled by Gautreaux' "romanticism" (and Cormac McCarthy's, as well!), I plead guilty. I'm not sure what "romanaticism" means in this context, but when the topic touches on Cormac McCarthy, I lose all rational perception and admit to being a fanatical (and unquestioning) disciple.

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