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Julia Nunnally Duncan updated their profile
Dec 10
Jerald Pope posted an event

Holiday Book Sale at Monte Vista Hotel

December 11, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Remember that precious book you received when you were a child? That worn out, scribbled-in book you still have somewhere? Looking for the perfect last-minute gift?  This Christmas, you can give a child or an adult that precious gift. The Black Mountain Authors Guild will present the second annual Holiday Book Sale at the Monte Vista Hotel on Thursday, December 11, from 6 until 7.  All books are written by local authors and cover genres from children’s picture books to memoirs to historical…See More
Dec 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Book Signing at MACA Building

December 12, 2014 from 5pm to 7pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her books at the McDowell Arts Council Association's Holiday Event on Friday, December 12, from 5-7 p.m. Held in MACA's gallery and gift shop, the event is open to the public and refreshments will be served.See More
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Fundraiser ( Poem )

Fundraiser ( Poem) Best Christmas idea fundraiser Send donation request letters A festival of trees to raffle You’ll get more then a tree of raddles Companie...
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Christmas Parade ( Part-7 )

From human reindeer pulling to an amazing Mr.& Mrs.Santa Clause on the sleigh float.
Dec 4
Christine Lajewski posted a blog post

Tribute to Ashley

One of my closest friends, Rachelle, lost her daughter to a canoeing accident on a frigid November night in 2005.  I wrote a poem as a tribute to Ashley, which was later published in Deep Waters, the Tall Grass Writers' Guild 2012 anthology.  As we approach the 9th anniversary of the loss of this lovely young woman, I have posted the poem in my blog at Christine-lajewski.squarespace.com I think any "likes" would be appreciated by Rachelle.  Thank you for reading it.See More
Nov 22
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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West End Poetry and Prose reading series: November edition at West End Bakery

November 22, 2014 from 7pm to 9pm
Join us for the 3rd in the West End reading series. This month we have 5 wonderful local authors. This is a marvelous Free family-friendly evening of prose, poetry, and storytelling featuring some of your favorite local Asheville writers. November's lineup includes:Allan Wolf Katey Schultz Matthew Olzmann Melissa Crowe Alli Marshallhosted by Lockie HunterSee More
Nov 20
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Ellison's new look at Kephart in Our Southern Highlanders, 3d edition

Ellison retells Kephart and broadens a legacyby Rob Neufeld             One of the most influential people in our region’s history—Horace Kephart, the controversial and fascinating genius of the Great Smokies—has warranted a new consideration by George Ellison, a long-time scholar of Kephart’s life and…See More
Nov 18
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Nov 15
Spellbound posted an event
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December ROYAL Book Club: Sabriel at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

December 7, 2014 from 4pm to 5pm
ROYAL is Spellbound’s monthly book club for adult Readers of Young Adult Literature. We meet the first Sunday of each month at 4:00PM. Anyone over 18 is welcome, no RSVP necessary. Book club selections are always 20% off until the day of the meeting.See More
Nov 15
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Tangible Evidence of Jesus at City Lights Bookstore

December 7, 2014 from 2pm to 3pm
Sylva author, Mary Joyce will present her book Tangible Evidence of Jesus on Sunday, December 7th at 2 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore. Tangible Evidence of Jesus was written after the Joyce plodded through much archaeological evidence and academic research. It is intended to be a bridge between scholarly researchers and most of the rest of us. It also was written for those who would like proof of Jesus beyond what is written in Christian Bibles. The writing style deliberately is condensed and to…See More
Nov 15
Renea Winchester shared City Lights Bookstore's event on Twitter
Nov 13
Renea Winchester is attending City Lights Bookstore's event
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The Charm of a Simple Country Farm at City Lights Bookstore

November 15, 2014 from 3pm to 4:30pm
On Saturday, November 15th at 3 p.m. Renea Winchester will visit City Lights Bookstore to present her new book, Farming Friends & Fried Bologna Sandwiches. Decades before the Farm-to-Table and Sustainable Living movement, Billy Albertson started tending a little strip of land just off Hardscrabble Road in what was then rural Roswell, Georgia. The second book in the Farmer Billy series, Farming transports readers to a simpler time, when roadside vegetable stands were common, friends gathered…See More
Nov 13
Renea Winchester posted an event

Author Reading/Book Signing at Great Expectations at Great Expectations Books

November 14, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Award-winning author, Renea Winchester will read from her latest book titled: Farming, Friends & Friend Bologna Sandwiches (Mercer University Press, October, 2014). The author will also give away seeds courtesy of Botanical Interests Seed CompanySee More
Nov 13
Jerald Pope posted an event

David LaMotte reads from his new book at Monte Vista Hotel

November 20, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
The Black Mountain Authors Guild presents David LaMotte, a true Black Mountain treasure, signing and reading from his new book, Worldchanging 101, at six o’clock this Thursday, at The Monte Vista Hotel. LaMotte has been a fixture on the local music scene since the early nineties, performing over 2500 concerts nationally and internationally. He has released eleven albums, won international songwriting awards, and earned accolades from the Boston Globe, Washington Times, Soundcheck Magazine…See More
Nov 11
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Nov 5

Asheville girls shaped Arthur Murray’s life

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Once upon a time, Asheville had been a dancing city.  Folk dancing and clogging persist in the mountains, but the hip dances in Southside joints and the ballroom dances downtown have become subjects for history.

            For the ballroom dancing, one figure and one place stand out: Arthur Murray at the old Battery Park Hotel, the Biltmore Estate-quality manor that had once sat atop a now-vanished hill.  (Battery Park Apartments now occupies the location.)

            In late 1914, as England was mounting its historic first aerial bombing on Germany, Arthur Murray, age nineteen, arrived at the Battery Park.  As a teen, he’d started dancing as a way of getting beyond his Jewish immigrant neighborhood, the Lower East Side in New York.  He discovered he had a gift.

            He won a waltz contest.  He taught at the Vernon and Irene Castle school.  Baroness de Kuttleson, an established dance teacher there, took him under her wing.  She advised him to lop off his last name, Teichman, because it sounded too German.  She took him to Asheville.  She charged his clients $50 per lesson, and pocketed $45 for herself.

            From all accounts, Murray—tall, foreign-looking, elegant, and a great dancer—had been a huge hit. 

            He grew a moustache.  “When Edith Vanderbilt saw him,” Jane Heimlich, his daughter, recounts, “she instructed him to take that fool thing off.  He was quick to do so.  She was one of his staunchest supporters, and often invited him to the Biltmore House to give lessons.”

            Heimlich, author of authoritative alternative medicine books and wife of surgeon Henry Heimlich, inventor of the Heimlich Maneuver, has just published a memoir, titled, “Out of Step.”  In it, she vividly recalls her father’s charm because of its connection to her mother’s suicide attempt.

            Her mother, Kathryn, whom Arthur had married in 1925, would go on to be as big a star as he on the TV show, “The Arthur Murray Party” (a popular variety show, on which young comic Johnny Carson had gotten his TV break).

            But in 1930, Arthur, who had already established a world famous dance-by-mail business, further wedded himself to his work by starting a chain of dance studios.  He travelled from his suburban home to his founding studio in Manhattan and spent days and nights with young female teachers and socialites.

            “The women were like the Southern girls that Arthur had admired so much in Asheville,” Heimlich writes. 

            Murray published a book, “The Secret of Popularity.”

            Kathryn, who had enjoyed the life of a flapper, but who did not dance, went to parties and drank bathtub gin, Heimlich relates.  A hired woman took care of the house, which included the Murrays’ twin daughters.  One night, Kathryn climbed out a window, dropped, and broke her spine.

            Asheville had its own tragic post-Crash jumps.  But in 1914, the city had been flying high.  The Great Gatsby, if he’d been here, would have been drawn to Battery Park Hotel dances like an outsider to the glow of the good life.

            Murray’s path to high society involved wooing rather than the takeover approach of the fictional Gatsby.  In 1914, charming Arthur received a letter from Edith Vanderbilt, who stated she was in charge of arrangements for the Christmas Ball.

            “Dear Mr. Murray,” she wrote, “I have been requested…to ask you if you would be kind enough to perform an exhibition dance at the ball tomorrow, Tuesday evening, Dec. 25.   I understand there is a young lady in Asheville who would dance with you, and I will ask you to please extend to her this invitation.”

            At future dances, Murray partnered with such local lasses as Misses Dorothy Lytle, Jeanette Hartzog, Doris Davenport, Louise Wise and Eustice Hudley.  On Saturday afternoons, he gave classes to children. 

            “To dance smartly, as society girls must,” Murray wrote in a brochure, “it is necessary to learn from well-bred teachers who are reared in an atmosphere of culture.”

SOURCES

Information in this article has been drawn from Jane Murray Heimlich’s new book, “Out of Step” (Orange Frazer Press); an interview with her; and “Encyclopedia of World Biography (Advameg).

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Arthur Murray poses with his wife Kathryn on the cover of their daughter Jane’s new book.

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I notice one of the local ladies who danced with Mr. Murray was Doris Davenport. I would assume this is the same lady who went on to marry Chester Pierce Munroe and lived for years on Edgemont Rd in Grove Park. Pack Library just received a collection of her papers last year which had ended up in the care of her neighbor after her death. The photo album, available online, is amazing and I can't wait to read the letters between her children, her end of the correspondence returned to her when they both died young.

 

http://tinyurl.com/47ro48q

 

http://history.abls.lib.nc.us/dbtw-wpd/abls/images/MS208_003%20Dori...

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