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Julia Nunnally Duncan updated their profile
Dec 10
Jerald Pope posted an event

Holiday Book Sale at Monte Vista Hotel

December 11, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Remember that precious book you received when you were a child? That worn out, scribbled-in book you still have somewhere? Looking for the perfect last-minute gift?  This Christmas, you can give a child or an adult that precious gift. The Black Mountain Authors Guild will present the second annual Holiday Book Sale at the Monte Vista Hotel on Thursday, December 11, from 6 until 7.  All books are written by local authors and cover genres from children’s picture books to memoirs to historical…See More
Dec 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Book Signing at MACA Building

December 12, 2014 from 5pm to 7pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her books at the McDowell Arts Council Association's Holiday Event on Friday, December 12, from 5-7 p.m. Held in MACA's gallery and gift shop, the event is open to the public and refreshments will be served.See More
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Fundraiser ( Poem )

Fundraiser ( Poem) Best Christmas idea fundraiser Send donation request letters A festival of trees to raffle You’ll get more then a tree of raddles Companie...
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Christmas Parade ( Part-7 )

From human reindeer pulling to an amazing Mr.& Mrs.Santa Clause on the sleigh float.
Dec 4
Christine Lajewski posted a blog post

Tribute to Ashley

One of my closest friends, Rachelle, lost her daughter to a canoeing accident on a frigid November night in 2005.  I wrote a poem as a tribute to Ashley, which was later published in Deep Waters, the Tall Grass Writers' Guild 2012 anthology.  As we approach the 9th anniversary of the loss of this lovely young woman, I have posted the poem in my blog at Christine-lajewski.squarespace.com I think any "likes" would be appreciated by Rachelle.  Thank you for reading it.See More
Nov 22
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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West End Poetry and Prose reading series: November edition at West End Bakery

November 22, 2014 from 7pm to 9pm
Join us for the 3rd in the West End reading series. This month we have 5 wonderful local authors. This is a marvelous Free family-friendly evening of prose, poetry, and storytelling featuring some of your favorite local Asheville writers. November's lineup includes:Allan Wolf Katey Schultz Matthew Olzmann Melissa Crowe Alli Marshallhosted by Lockie HunterSee More
Nov 20
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Ellison's new look at Kephart in Our Southern Highlanders, 3d edition

Ellison retells Kephart and broadens a legacyby Rob Neufeld             One of the most influential people in our region’s history—Horace Kephart, the controversial and fascinating genius of the Great Smokies—has warranted a new consideration by George Ellison, a long-time scholar of Kephart’s life and…See More
Nov 18
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Nov 15
Spellbound posted an event
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December ROYAL Book Club: Sabriel at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

December 7, 2014 from 4pm to 5pm
ROYAL is Spellbound’s monthly book club for adult Readers of Young Adult Literature. We meet the first Sunday of each month at 4:00PM. Anyone over 18 is welcome, no RSVP necessary. Book club selections are always 20% off until the day of the meeting.See More
Nov 15
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Tangible Evidence of Jesus at City Lights Bookstore

December 7, 2014 from 2pm to 3pm
Sylva author, Mary Joyce will present her book Tangible Evidence of Jesus on Sunday, December 7th at 2 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore. Tangible Evidence of Jesus was written after the Joyce plodded through much archaeological evidence and academic research. It is intended to be a bridge between scholarly researchers and most of the rest of us. It also was written for those who would like proof of Jesus beyond what is written in Christian Bibles. The writing style deliberately is condensed and to…See More
Nov 15
Renea Winchester shared City Lights Bookstore's event on Twitter
Nov 13
Renea Winchester is attending City Lights Bookstore's event
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The Charm of a Simple Country Farm at City Lights Bookstore

November 15, 2014 from 3pm to 4:30pm
On Saturday, November 15th at 3 p.m. Renea Winchester will visit City Lights Bookstore to present her new book, Farming Friends & Fried Bologna Sandwiches. Decades before the Farm-to-Table and Sustainable Living movement, Billy Albertson started tending a little strip of land just off Hardscrabble Road in what was then rural Roswell, Georgia. The second book in the Farmer Billy series, Farming transports readers to a simpler time, when roadside vegetable stands were common, friends gathered…See More
Nov 13
Renea Winchester posted an event

Author Reading/Book Signing at Great Expectations at Great Expectations Books

November 14, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Award-winning author, Renea Winchester will read from her latest book titled: Farming, Friends & Friend Bologna Sandwiches (Mercer University Press, October, 2014). The author will also give away seeds courtesy of Botanical Interests Seed CompanySee More
Nov 13
Jerald Pope posted an event

David LaMotte reads from his new book at Monte Vista Hotel

November 20, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
The Black Mountain Authors Guild presents David LaMotte, a true Black Mountain treasure, signing and reading from his new book, Worldchanging 101, at six o’clock this Thursday, at The Monte Vista Hotel. LaMotte has been a fixture on the local music scene since the early nineties, performing over 2500 concerts nationally and internationally. He has released eleven albums, won international songwriting awards, and earned accolades from the Boston Globe, Washington Times, Soundcheck Magazine…See More
Nov 11
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Nov 5

New collection by Nobel Prize favorite generates talk

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Shortly before Chinese dissident novelist Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize for literature on Oct. 11, bookies had been laying odds on other front-runners.

            Ladbrokes, a world leader in online betting, had had Mo Yan at 8:1 on Oct. 4.  Japanese novelist, Haruki Murakami, a perennial favorite, had been a 3:1 pick.  And Irish writer William Trevor, widely recognized as the greatest living short story writer, had posted a phenomenal rise from 100:1 to 8:1 odds, based on a rush of bets.

            Trevor is the author of 18 novels and 19 volumes of short stories, many of which have been winners of or finalists in the running for Great Britain’s two top awards, the Man Booker Prize and the Whitbread (now called the Costa) Book Award.

            His latest volume, “Selected Stories,” just out in paperback, brings together stories from his last four collections.  It is the subject of a Book Discussion X discussion, Nov. 15 at Accent on Books.

 

A pro con

 

            Betting—in a manner of speaking—is the subject of Trevor’s story, “Against the Odds”—about a confidence woman, going by the name of Mabel Kincaid, who ducks into a town south of Belfast and hooks a widowed turkey farmer.

            When the farmer, named Blakely, shows up for their having-given-things-time appointment two months after he’s written her a check in trust, he waits an hour, “believing that against the odds there might somehow be an explanation.”

            That sad event occurs two paragraphs from the end of Trevor’s O. Henry-type story, which differs from the old master’s tales in that it applies shadowy transitions rather than bold highlights.

            In the next paragraph, we learn that Blakely still harbors a spark of optimism about his belle, and it is not unlike the optimism that the Irish hold onto in the wake of the short-lived cease-fire with which the story had started.

            The last paragraph features another twist—not a dropped shoe, but something hanging in the air.

            All this talk about the ending leaves out the pleasure of the previous 15 pages: the very believable progress of the courtship/con; the roots of Mrs. Kincaid’s compulsive behavior; and dour Blakely’s transformation.

            To read a Trevor story is to identify with people in whom wavering morality, experience of hurt, and flickering grace mix. 

            As a man whose youth had been shaped by his father’s frequent change of hometown, Trevor has observed many types.  Like O. Henry, his notables are the non-notable.

 

Enslaved parent

 

            Reading today’s news while reading Trevor’s story, “Gilbert’s Mother” has me thinking about the mother, Rosalie Manion.

            Her story begins, “On November 20th 1989, a Monday, in an area of South London not previously notable for acts of violence, Carol Dickson, a nineteen-year-old shop assistant, was bludgeoned to death between the hours of ten-fifteen and midnight.”

            Though Rosalie had heard her grown, loner son come in from his wanderings earlier than that that night, she worries, as she always worries when a crime is reported, that he might be the culprit.  She knows, more than anyone else, that he’s odd.

            As a child, he’d refused to do school work.  Psychiatric hospitals and social workers had simply noted that he was boring.  “Talks excessively about photocopying,” one reported.

            His father couldn’t and didn’t love him, and Gilbert’s unnerving detachment and intensity of observation caused his parents’ divorce, Rosalie feels.

            In essence, Rosalie is enslaved to her dread and to her need for constant vigilance of Gilbert.  “Her role was only to accept,” the story concludes.  “No one would ever understand the mystery of his existence, or the unshed tears they shared.”

            What brand of story is this?  It’s not a story of a parent who protects a criminal son.  Odds are Gilbert is not a criminal.  It’s not a story about a struggle to understand an illness; or about the grace note of loyalty and love.

            It’s a story about the fixed place that mystery inhabits in our lives.

 

Port in a storm 

           

            Different scenes—from multiple views and characters’ memories—overlap in Trevor’s fiction; and plots shift perversely.  Sometimes the action can be as plain as peeling a potato; and, at other times, as seismic as a treachery; or a vow of love.

            Such is life.  And such is fiction, unless you want to represent it as sitcom shtick or comic book heroism.

            Loyalty is, in fact, the compass point in many of Trevor’s stories, despite the problematic impression “Gilbert’s Mother” leaves; and loyalty often equates to love.

            In “Death of a Professor,” an old professor’s beautiful younger wife hides from him the newspaper obit that a spiteful prankster had written about him.  The professor goes to a party where all of the other professors—a satirized, poisonous bunch—do know, and it’s a blow.

            The old professor’s figuring out of the misdeed—and his adoration of his wife—reminds her how much she loves him for his wisdom, a quality separate from competitive excellence.  “It is the wedding of their differences that protects them, steadfast in the debris of the storm.”

            Yes, society can be quite a hunger game in Trevorland, but his stories often enough shift tone to make you feel as if you’re in different universes.

            Sometimes, they are as hilarious as a Roald Dahl tale; or as tough as a Sean O’Casey play.

            In “The Mourning,” a simple lad wanting a bigger life in London, gets caught up first in the prejudice against low-wage Irishmen, and then in a terrorist plot.  The turning point in his fate as bomb-carrying hero versus hometown clod turns on words he remembers his da saying.

            “A Friendship” begins with ten- and eight-year old brothers pouring concrete into their father’s golf bag.  The father is a tyrant to his wife, whose life is made sweet by her best friend Margy, an instigator.  There’s going to be a clash.

            Loyalty cleaves in both meanings of the word here.  It clings on one hand, and severs on the other.  No wonder forgiveness is such a virtue; everyone’s got blood on their hands, and sometimes they don’t mean to have caused it.

 

THE BOOK

Selected Stories by William Trevor (Penguin trade paper, Sept. 27, 2011, 576 pages, $18)

 

EVENT

Book Discussion X meets to discuss “Selected Stories” by William Trevor at Accent on Books, Accent on Books, 854 Merrimon Ave., 7 p.m., Thurs., Nov. 15.   Call 252-6255.

STORIES TO BE DISCUSSED

Against the Odds

A Bit on the Side

Cheating at Canasta

The Children

Child’s Play

A Day

Death of a Professor

The Dressmaker’s Child

Gilbert’s Mother

The Hill Bachelors

Men of Ireland

The Piano Tuner’s Wife

The Room

Traditions

Widows

A Friendship

The Mourning

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