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Patti Jensen posted an event

Murders, Moonshine & Mountaineers Book Discussion & Signing at The Market on Oak

March 21, 2015 from 11am to 12pm
The Market on Oak in Spruce Pine will host Allen Cook, author of Murders, Moonshine & Mountaineers: The Wildest County in America on Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 11A.M.Moonshine, Murder & Mountaineers recounts a time around the turn of the 19th century when moonshiners and desperadoes faced off against the law in epic battles that made national headlines. The book focuses on events from an area in western North Carolina that held the reputation as the wildest county in America (book has…See More
2 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

AHS football team, first year of integration

Asheville High integration played out on the football teamby Rob Neufeld Part 1 of 2             “We should have had a championship team,” Willie Ray, now a pastor, says about the 1969 Asheville High School football team for which he played on the offensive and defensive lines.            That was the…See More
Tuesday
Ali Mangkang posted events
Feb 25
Gary Carden commented on Gary Carden's event Gary Neil Carden
"The time of the March 6 performance is 7:30 p.m."
Feb 25
Gary Carden posted an event

Gary Neil Carden at A-B Tech

March 6, 2015 at 7pm to March 7, 2015 at 2pm
WNC Historical Association will sponsor a concert (staged) reading of Gary Carden's play, "The Raindrop Waltz" in the Ferguson Auditorium on March 6th at 7:00 and March 7th at 2:00pm. The playwright will attend the performances and will enter into a dialogue with the audience about the autobiographical content of the play. A-B Tech is on 340 Victoria Road in Asheville.See More
Feb 24
Spellbound posted events
Feb 20
Jerald Pope posted an event

Reading cancelled tonight at Black Mountain

February 19, 2015 from 6pm to 7pm
The reading on Thursday, Feb 19 of David Madden's new book at the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain has been cancelled. It will be rescheduled. See More
Feb 19
Susan Lorraine Norwood posted photos
Feb 10
Jerald Pope posted an event

Madden Reads from Latest Collection of Short Stories at Monte Vista Hotel

February 19, 2015 from 6pm to 7pm
The Black Mountain Authors Guild will present local author David Madden reading from his collection of short stories, The Last Bizarre Tale­, Thursday, February 19, 6pm, at the Monte Vista Hotel. With titles like “Who Killed Harpo Marx?” and “James Agee Never Lived in This House,” Maddens stories range wide over time, geography, and the human soul. In “The Last Bizarre Tale,” for example, a young man witnesses strange behavior involving a corpse that has hung on a hook in a funeral home garage…See More
Feb 9
Michael Hopping updated their profile
Feb 9
Jane Blue posted an event

Earth Week Celebration in Andrews NC at Andrews NC, various location throughout the town

April 22, 2015 to April 26, 2015
A special celebration honoring the local and regional talents of Andrews NC and Cherokee County, featuring author readings and book signings by Gary Carden, Wayne Caldwell, Anna Berenyi and hopefully more authors of Appalachia. Drummings, Native American crafts, Nature walks, Backyard remedies, Native Bees, Animals of the Forest, Country and Blue Grass Music and so much more.See More
Feb 4
Ali Mangkang updated their profile
Jan 28
Ali Mangkang posted an event

Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award at Asheville Renaissance Hotel

February 7, 2015 from 5pm to 7pm
Honoring Author Robert Morgan for his selected work"The Road From Gap Creek". The presentation of the award includes a reading followed by a reception.For more informationSee More
Jan 28
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Jan 27
Chevin Woodruff posted an event
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An Evening with Barbara Woodall at Splendor Mountain at Splendor Mountain

January 27, 2015 from 6pm to 8pm
Barbara Taylor Woodall was born and raised in Rabun County Georgia. This county touches both North Carolina and South Carolina, so you can already guess it was a special place to grow a child. Barbara wrote about her life as a child and the wonderful people God joined her to as she grew and learned. It's Not My Mountain Anymore tells some of these stories. Barbara will share from her book and from her life, June 6, 2015 at Splendor Mountain.See More
Jan 27
Avery Ray McKinney Jr. updated their profile
Jan 23

Biltmore Forest’s Downton Abbey spirits add a chapter

by Rob Neufeld

 

            “Ruth, I want to go back home,” 93-year-old Bessie Reeves told her great-niece, Ruth Bailey, when Ruth visited her at the Deerfield Retirement Community in 1970.  Bessie yearned for her former life on White Oak Road in Biltmore Forest.

            White Oak Road had been the first street on which home owners had built homes after Edith Vanderbilt had sold nearly 1,500 acres of the Biltmore Estate to a development company in 1920. 

            The builders, D. Hiden Ramsey wrote in a 1925 booklet, “wished to create and abide in a community where persons of moderate means could build homes that would embody on a smaller scale the same ideals which actuated Mr. Vanderbilt in the creation of the Biltmore Estate.”

            Bessie and her maiden sister, Ethel, lived at 11 White Oak, and, through the Depression, hosted neighborhood women in cards-and-cocktails, aided by their servants. 

            Rita Rees, an unmarried member of the tannery-owning Hans Rees family came; as did Alice Connally Cheesborough, whose husband, Dr. Thomas Cheesborough had died in 1937.

            As a young woman, Bessie had accompanied wealthy women to England, and came back with a British accent.  You can imagine her saying to Ruth, in the voice of Lady Violet, the Dowager Countess in “Downton Abbey,” “Oh, Ruthie, I wish you could have as much fun as I had as a bride in Asheville, but you never will.”

            The Reeves family was related to the Rutledges of Charleston, extending a lifestyle line from England to antebellum Charleston, Flat Rock, Victorian era Montford, and Biltmore Forest.

            Bessie died at the age of 101.  A subsequent owner of her home, not given to belief in the occult, attested to her lingering presence.

           “One night,” he said, “one of us had placed a candle down on the grouting” of a tile countertop he and his wife had had installed.  “The next morning, I walked in the kitchen, saw the candle, and walked over to the sink.  Something told me to turn around; and I did, just in time to see the candle go up in an arc and down to the floor.”

            Ethel, who had preceded Bessie in death, has been heard wandering around at night looking for the door from her bedroom to the bathroom.  A renovation had walled off Ethel’s entrance.

            As Mr. Carson, the butler at Downton Abbey, has noted, servants sometimes end up being more attached to their mansions than their owners, and are likely to haunt the places after they’ve passed away.

            At 17 White Oak, a genial, old he-ghost has been seen frequenting what had been the home of Sarah Fotterill Potter Coxe, the fifth member of Bessie Reeves’ card-playing group. 

            Bailey recalled, in a 2000 interview, sleeping in the front bedroom of that house as a five-year-old and seeing a man “climb through a window with a cot under his arm,” and set up to sleep there.  She asked the man to leave, and he did.

            A later resident seemed to have an encounter with the same spirit.  “I came into one of the front bedrooms,” the new owner said, “and sensed …an older gentleman, 5’2”, white hair, mostly bald, about 105 pounds, with pleasant features” communicating with him.

           "This is going to be where your girls are going to live,” the spirit said, acknowledging that his presence would “not be pleasant for them.  I’ll leave.”

           Sallie Middleton, the late artist and niece of architect, Douglas Ellington, saw a less pleasant ghost when she had gone to buy 16 White Oak, the former residence of Alice Cheesborough.  Her description of a woman with graying red hair, a slight build, and nervous habits matched  Mrs. Cheesborough’s live-in housekeeper, Alma, whom Mrs. Cheesborough had called “the old spook” for her disapproving glances. 

            Alma had been proud of her status as keeper of decorum in the Cheesborough household, and was aggrieved when Middleton’s entrance displaced her from the largest bedroom into the smallest. 

            One day, Alma’s ghost departed—at the same time that the butler had made his final exit from the house across the street.   Some say that the two servants discovered they could commiserate; and the association developed into a post-corporeal romance.

 

PHOTO CAPTION

 

Wedding party for Jessie Merrick and Alfred S. Barnard, c. 1900, photo taken at Lindsey’s Art Parlor.

Top row (l to r): Unidentified man; Vance Brown; Detta Merrick.  Middle row: Philip Cocke; perhaps a Miss West; Julia Atkinson; Elmer E. or William R. Heston.  Bottom row: Bonnie Reeves; Erwin Sluder; Bessie Reeves; unidentified man; Haywood Parker; and perhaps Nina Johnson.

Photo courtesy N.C. Collection, Pack Memorial Library.

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