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William Ritter & Sarah Ogletree Fundraising Concert at City Lights Bookstore

July 16, 2016 from 6:30pm to 8pm
William Ritter and Sarah Ogletree will perform a fundraising acoustic concert at City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, July 16th at 6:30pm. Donations will be collected for a friend, Aaron Shapiro, to help raise money for a volunteer trip to Malawi to assist with the construction of a school. William Ritter and Sarah Ogletree have been playing traditional mountain music together in WNC for the past five years. Their self-titled CD is on sale in the bookstore and will be available during the…See More
13 hours ago
Robert Woodwart updated their profile
Monday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 18
N. John Shore, Jr. updated their profile
Jun 10
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Metro Wines

June 18, 2016 from 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Connie Regan-Blake is a nationally celebrated storyteller and workshop leader. Join us in this intimate setting (with plenty of parking) for an evening of stories as her storytelling and coaching students "Take the Stage!" You'll enjoy a variety of stories and storytelling styles with tellers Vixi Jil Glen, Christine Phillips Westfeldt, Martha Reed Johnson, Dottie Jean Kirk, Mikalena Zuckett, Lee Lyons and Hettie Barnes. Ticket price includes a glass of wine so 'come on down'! Tickets can be…See More
Jun 9
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 7
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Jun 5
Caroline McIntyre posted an event
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Buncombe Chautauqua History Alive - Mark Twain, Amelia Earhart, Matthew Henson, Wernher von Braun at A-B Technical Community College, Ferguson Auditorium, 340 Victoria Rd, Asheville

June 20, 2016 at 7pm to June 23, 2016 at 7pm
Nationally acclaimed historical interpreters perform as four of American's Greatest Adventures.Laugh out loud with MARK TWAIN, the iconic world traveler and wily intellectual whose books inspired America’s spirit of adventure.Take to the skies with AMELIA EARHART, whose courage and plucky personality showed how women could soar beyond society's expectations.Race to the North Pole with MATTHEW HENSON, the intrepid African American explorer who co–discovered the North Pole.Blast into space with…See More
Jun 2
Margaret P Johnson updated their profile
May 31
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Isaac Coleman, 2011

A 2011 interview with the late activist, Isaac Coleman by Rob NeufeldCivil rights activist and local civic leader Isaac Coleman, born Nov. 6, 1943 in Lexington, Ky., lived his last 44 years in Asheville, and died on May 10, 2016,.We talked in 2011 about his career, starting with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960. Q:  Was the SNCC your first involvement in civil rights? A:   I was a student at Knoxville College, an African-American College in Knoxville, Tennessee, and…See More
May 22
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Stories by the River Benefit for Girls Rock Asheville at Ole Shakeys 790 Riverside Drive in AVL

May 21, 2016 from 7pm to 9pm
Sip a drink by the river and enjoy stories and songs on a warm spring day!All donations benefit Girls Rock Asheville!Stories read by:Lori Horvitz  Melanie McGee Bianchi  Kim Winter Mako  Ky Delaney  and Lockie Huntermusical guests Leo+VirgoSee More
May 18
Sue Diehl posted an event
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Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon at Montreat College, Gaither Fellowship Hall

June 4, 2016 from 12pm to 2pm
Author Susan S. Kelly will the speaker at Montreat College Friends of the Library annual luncheon at noon on Saturday, June 4, 2016.  She is the author of five novels and a major contributing author to Our State Magazine.Call 828-669-8012 Ext. 3502 for Reservations.  $16.00See More
May 17
Sheilah Jastrzebski replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion The history of Oakley
"This is an interesting article.  It gives a few clues to the neighborhood I imagine from the old days. The woman from who my husband and I bought our Oakley home, Melody,  always talks about "Mr. Wilson" who entrusted her with…"
May 16
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The history of Oakley

Oakley is a place with an unforgettable historyby Rob NeufeldAn earlier time PHOTO CAPTION: The Taylor family of Oakley: Jean, Virgil, Sadie Louise, and Dan, c. 1936.  Photo courtesy Dan Taylor.            “We had hobos come to our house, and my mother would never turn them away,” Dan Taylor says of his experience…See More
May 13
Rob Neufeld posted blog posts
May 13
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Juniper Bends quarterly poetry and prose reading at Downtown Books and News

May 6, 2016 from 7pm to 9pm
Join your fellow literature-craving citizens at the next upcoming Juniper Bends reading on Friday May 6th at 7PM. We will be luxuriating in sound, soaking up nutritious poetry & prose after the dark winter. Our series aims to bring together both established and emerging writers, and we are honored to bring together Gary Hawkins, Catherine Campbell, Stephanie Johnson and Michael Pittard's collective word-magic for this lovely spring evening. As usual, our generous host site is Downtown Books…See More
May 3

Jewish-Muslim peace advocates speak through novel

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Love keeps waging its innocent war against the effects of divide-and-conquer.

            When Bahia Abrams, Asheville author of “The Other Half of My Soul,” met Lina Adas, owner of Pita Express in Hendersonville, they discovered they had a few things in common.

            Both their families are from the Middle East.  Abrams was born to a Syrian Jewish family in Brooklyn; Adas to a Palestinian family that had been relocated from Jerusalem to a refugee camp in Jordan when she’d been four.

            Both women had defied their strict parents to marry the men they loved.  Adas had married a man not rich enough for her father; Abrams had married an Ashkenazi rather than Sephardic Jew.

            Their third bond is their most recent one.  Adas has translated “The Other Half of My Soul,” a novel about a love marriage between a Syrian Jewish-American woman and a Syrian Shi’ite man, into Arabic, with the hope of having its thriller-embedded message disseminated worldwide.

            The English language book, published in 2007 by Asheville publisher Grateful Steps, continues to sell, garnering its latest rave from South Africa; and multiplying its hardcover sales now that it is available as an e-book.

            Currently, the novel is ranked 6,000 among all Kindle books; and is number 6 in its category, Jewish fiction—an ironic classification, for Amazon only assigns one, and the bridge to Muslim fiction gets left out.

 

First meeting

 

            A few years ago, Abrams went to the Islamic Center of Asheville to attend a talk Adas gave, titled, “In Search of Peace and Common Ground.”

            Adas read from her family heirloom, a 3,000-page edition of the Koran that includes Arabic, Urdu, and English texts.  The Urdu is a survival of the Muslim population forced out of India during the Great Partition in 1947—when the Hindi document was transliterated into the Arabic alphabet.

            “How do you reconcile that the Koran has hatred of Jews in it?” Abrams asked at the talk.  The Prophet Muhammad had put wrath into his message of love after Jewish leaders in Medina had rejected him as an Arabian prophet.

            “I don’t interpret the Koran that way,” Adas responded.  “I see the beauty.”

            She represents a large number of Muslims who attend to the enlightened heart of their Holy Book; view the anger in their gospel as Christians view God’s anger in the Bible—that is, as incident-specific judgments; and oppose the use of hatred among radical jihadists.

            “Ask any woman in any village in Palestine what she wants,” Adas said in an interview with the Citizen-Times, “and she would say ‘ana badi salam’—‘I want peace.  I want to be able to raise my children and not worry about a bomb coming into my home; or, when my kids are older, I don’t want them to be tempted by someone who might lure them to be a suicide bomber to go to heaven.’”

            At the end of Adas’ talk at the Asheville mosque, Abrams passed her novel to her.  A few months later, Adas called offering to translate it so that it could get into the hands of Muslim women from Indiana to Indonesia.

 

The novel

 

            When Rami, the Ba’ath regime-funded Syrian, meets Rayna, the Brooklyn Jew, in the registration hall at the University of Maryland in “The Other Half of My Soul,” it is love at first sight for the two freshmen.

            “A flame ignited and a glorious stream of energy rushed through his blood,” Abrams writes.  “A wordless communication surged between them when she met his gaze.”

            “American audiences love sex and violence,” Abrams says about her at-times sexy book.  Certain parts had to be toned down and rewritten for the Arabic edition.

            The couple’s sexual attraction is related to fate in the novel.  Rami feels that he and Rayna had known each other in a previous life.  Mating—and the completion of souls—acts as a major subversive force in the undoing of hate-mongering clannishness.

            Rami’s U.S, opportunity has come about because of a leading terrorist’s ulterior motives—to develop alliances in South America’s Triple Frontier; and to monopolize a chemist’s oil-eating bacteria.

            Thus, the novel uses a mixture of a high octane suspense plot and a high testosterone romance as a syrup to present the realities of interfaith marriage and persecution-hardened traditions.

 

Tradition and love

 

            Adas and her husband, Mohamid, had been childhood friends in Husn, a refugee camp in which people had to walk three miles to get water.  When Adas turned 18, Mohamid approached her father asking to marry his eldest daughter of seven girls.

            Lina’s father said no and would not give a reason.  “But she loves me and I love her,” Mohamid said, and was kicked out of the house.

            Finally, common sense and fatherly concern won out, but not until after Lina had been beaten by an older brother and imprisoned in the house for a year.  Mohamid had sent her letters during this time via Lina’s female fellow students at the university they all attended.  The letters said: “I still want you.  It doesn’t matter, we’ll fight this.  We’ll get together.”

            “Maybe this is a movie!” Adas exclaimed in the interview.

            She related how she’d told her father, “If I don’t get married, then your other six daughters will stay here.”  Tradition dictated that daughters must get married in age order; and that unmarried girls stay at home.

            A former employer of Lina had appealed to her father about the girl’s intelligence and the shame of wasting it.

            “As soon as we got married,” Adas stated, “we said, we’re not staying in this country. 

            The couple’s son, Ahamad, was born in 1988, after they both had gotten jobs and a house outside of the camp.  Forty days later, the family was in the U.S.

            “I’m not going to repeat history with my son,” Lina had vowed.  Now, though her and Mohamid’s families do not communicate, Ahamad and his sister, Dalia, both practicing Muslims, are steeped in tolerance.

            At the Hendersonville Elementary School, a dozen years ago, Dalia and a Jewish girl had been at each other’s throats constantly until their mothers brought them together in a play date at Adas’ house.  It was Ramadan, and the girlfriend fasted until sunset with the Adases.  Lina also had the girls hold hands all day, and since then, she says, “they have been best friends.”

 

Peace-bringers

 

            Both Abrams and Adas are on peaceful missions, and give talks in various venues.

            They are looking for a publisher for their Arabic edition who can reach international audiences.  If the book causes a stir, all the better, Abrams says.

            She herself had been disturbingly stirred; and had bestirred herself.  Her son had been working on the 60th floor of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, when he’d felt the first tremor.  He got out four minutes before the North Tower collapsed.  Abrams’ subsequent hatred of the Islamic terrorists—and all Muslims—led her, she says, to write “The Other Half of My Soul,” and imagine a coming together of historical antagonists.

            Subsequently, she has made herself a student of the Koran and Middle East history.  In 2011, she published “Alien at Home: Divine Intervention” a chronicle of the exodus of Elie Sutton, whose Syrian Jewish father had to export each of his seven sons out of the region to avoid ant-Semitic violence.

            Adas has put aside her journalism career to put her cooking skills to good use.  Her restaurant, Pita Express in Hendersonville, offers genuine, home-made Syrian foods, and is a gathering place.  In that space, she teaches classes in belly-dancing and in the Arabic language.  She goes out into the community to talk about diversity.

THE BOOK

The Other Half of My Soul by Bahia Abrams (Grateful Steps hardcover, 2007, 371 pages, $24).

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Bahia Abrams (l) and Lina Adas (r) at Pita Express (photo by Rob Neufeld)

 

THE EVENT AND MORE

 

Bahia Abrams talks about her book and inaugurates the Interfaith Discussion Series at Grateful Steps Bookshop, 159 South Lexington Ave., Asheville, 5:30 p.m., Jan. 17.  Call 277-0998’ or visit www.gratefulsteps.orgRescheduled for Jan. 24.

 

Pita Express is located at 1034C Greenville Highway, Hendersonville. Call 696-9818; visit pitaexpresshville.com/blog.

 

Regarding speaking engagements, contact Bahia Abrams at BahiaAbrams@aol.com and Lina Adas at w.Dove@Juno.com

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