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Avery Ray McKinney Jr. updated their profile
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David Joy Presents His Debut Novel at City Lights Bookstore

March 6, 2015 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Webster author, David Joy will present his new novel on Friday, March 6th at 6:30 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore.  Where All Light Tends to Go, a staff pick of both Chris and Eon, is set in Jackson County and tells the story of Jacob McNeely, a young man who is in a fight against his fate. “Expertly balancing beauty and brutality, David has written a novel that stays with the reader long after the final page has been read.  Where All Light Tends to Go, though very much an Appalachian tale, is…See More
Thursday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Wednesday
Caralyn Davis posted a blog post

Color Blind, My First Eco-Fiction, Published & Waiting to Be Read

My short story "Color Blind" is now up at Eclectica Magazine. It's got animal extinctions, Sekhmet, Santa Claus, golden Panamanian frogs, real science, fake science, and lots of cats -- in a very economical, easy-reading 1,700 words.See More
Jan 15
Sarah Harden posted an event

Rose Senehi, Speaker for CMLC's January Speaker Series at Henderson County Main Branch Library in the Kaplan Auditorium.

January 14, 2015 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Join Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy (CMLC) Wednesday, January 14th for a presentation from Rose Senehi, esteemed Chimney Rock author of novels Dancing on Rocks, Render Unto the Valley, and many more. She will read passages from her books while elaborating on her local inspirations. At the end of her readings, Senehi will conduct a Q&A session and book signing.Many of Senehi’s novels have woven together several of CMLC’s regional land conservation accomplishments. In the Shadows of…See More
Jan 12
Rodney Page commented on Rob Neufeld's group Promoting Writers
"Happy to join the group...Relatively new to North Carolina. Have published a thriller, Powers Not Delegated, and my second book, The Xerces Factor launches in April 2015. see more at my website: www.rodneypagebooks.com"
Jan 12
Rodney Page posted photos
Jan 12
Charles Oliver shared Rob Neufeld's discussion on Facebook
Jan 10
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jan 10
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Jan 10
Gregg Jones updated their profile
Jan 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

1962, Tunnel Road--an era remembered

We remember Tunnel Road and 1960by Rob Neufeld             The “Buck Burger”—“made with two pure beef patties,” tomato, lettuce, cheese, and a dill chip, “served with Buck’s own special dressing on a toasted bun.”             That was something that you could get at Buck’s Drive-In on Tunnel Road, from 1946 to 1972, when…See More
Jan 2
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Dec 27, 2014
Dave Turner shared their blog post on Facebook
Dec 26, 2014
Dave Turner posted a blog post

Billy Ray's Chevrolet and Other Writings and Photographs from a Southern Appalachian Valley

Thought of this little piece from my eBook today:Brittle sticks and dry leaves on the ground crunch beneath my feet.The day is crisp and cold.The sky is white and the sunlight is dreamlike, filtered by thin clouds and casting a surreal glow.A sharp north wind gusts and swishes through bare branches and across frozen ground powdered with new snow.Ancient mountains rise with leafless trees revealing the tops of ridges you can’t see in summer, just as they did during the winters of my…See More
Dec 26, 2014
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Dec 23, 2014

Jewish-Muslim peace advocates speak through novel

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Love keeps waging its innocent war against the effects of divide-and-conquer.

            When Bahia Abrams, Asheville author of “The Other Half of My Soul,” met Lina Adas, owner of Pita Express in Hendersonville, they discovered they had a few things in common.

            Both their families are from the Middle East.  Abrams was born to a Syrian Jewish family in Brooklyn; Adas to a Palestinian family that had been relocated from Jerusalem to a refugee camp in Jordan when she’d been four.

            Both women had defied their strict parents to marry the men they loved.  Adas had married a man not rich enough for her father; Abrams had married an Ashkenazi rather than Sephardic Jew.

            Their third bond is their most recent one.  Adas has translated “The Other Half of My Soul,” a novel about a love marriage between a Syrian Jewish-American woman and a Syrian Shi’ite man, into Arabic, with the hope of having its thriller-embedded message disseminated worldwide.

            The English language book, published in 2007 by Asheville publisher Grateful Steps, continues to sell, garnering its latest rave from South Africa; and multiplying its hardcover sales now that it is available as an e-book.

            Currently, the novel is ranked 6,000 among all Kindle books; and is number 6 in its category, Jewish fiction—an ironic classification, for Amazon only assigns one, and the bridge to Muslim fiction gets left out.

 

First meeting

 

            A few years ago, Abrams went to the Islamic Center of Asheville to attend a talk Adas gave, titled, “In Search of Peace and Common Ground.”

            Adas read from her family heirloom, a 3,000-page edition of the Koran that includes Arabic, Urdu, and English texts.  The Urdu is a survival of the Muslim population forced out of India during the Great Partition in 1947—when the Hindi document was transliterated into the Arabic alphabet.

            “How do you reconcile that the Koran has hatred of Jews in it?” Abrams asked at the talk.  The Prophet Muhammad had put wrath into his message of love after Jewish leaders in Medina had rejected him as an Arabian prophet.

            “I don’t interpret the Koran that way,” Adas responded.  “I see the beauty.”

            She represents a large number of Muslims who attend to the enlightened heart of their Holy Book; view the anger in their gospel as Christians view God’s anger in the Bible—that is, as incident-specific judgments; and oppose the use of hatred among radical jihadists.

            “Ask any woman in any village in Palestine what she wants,” Adas said in an interview with the Citizen-Times, “and she would say ‘ana badi salam’—‘I want peace.  I want to be able to raise my children and not worry about a bomb coming into my home; or, when my kids are older, I don’t want them to be tempted by someone who might lure them to be a suicide bomber to go to heaven.’”

            At the end of Adas’ talk at the Asheville mosque, Abrams passed her novel to her.  A few months later, Adas called offering to translate it so that it could get into the hands of Muslim women from Indiana to Indonesia.

 

The novel

 

            When Rami, the Ba’ath regime-funded Syrian, meets Rayna, the Brooklyn Jew, in the registration hall at the University of Maryland in “The Other Half of My Soul,” it is love at first sight for the two freshmen.

            “A flame ignited and a glorious stream of energy rushed through his blood,” Abrams writes.  “A wordless communication surged between them when she met his gaze.”

            “American audiences love sex and violence,” Abrams says about her at-times sexy book.  Certain parts had to be toned down and rewritten for the Arabic edition.

            The couple’s sexual attraction is related to fate in the novel.  Rami feels that he and Rayna had known each other in a previous life.  Mating—and the completion of souls—acts as a major subversive force in the undoing of hate-mongering clannishness.

            Rami’s U.S, opportunity has come about because of a leading terrorist’s ulterior motives—to develop alliances in South America’s Triple Frontier; and to monopolize a chemist’s oil-eating bacteria.

            Thus, the novel uses a mixture of a high octane suspense plot and a high testosterone romance as a syrup to present the realities of interfaith marriage and persecution-hardened traditions.

 

Tradition and love

 

            Adas and her husband, Mohamid, had been childhood friends in Husn, a refugee camp in which people had to walk three miles to get water.  When Adas turned 18, Mohamid approached her father asking to marry his eldest daughter of seven girls.

            Lina’s father said no and would not give a reason.  “But she loves me and I love her,” Mohamid said, and was kicked out of the house.

            Finally, common sense and fatherly concern won out, but not until after Lina had been beaten by an older brother and imprisoned in the house for a year.  Mohamid had sent her letters during this time via Lina’s female fellow students at the university they all attended.  The letters said: “I still want you.  It doesn’t matter, we’ll fight this.  We’ll get together.”

            “Maybe this is a movie!” Adas exclaimed in the interview.

            She related how she’d told her father, “If I don’t get married, then your other six daughters will stay here.”  Tradition dictated that daughters must get married in age order; and that unmarried girls stay at home.

            A former employer of Lina had appealed to her father about the girl’s intelligence and the shame of wasting it.

            “As soon as we got married,” Adas stated, “we said, we’re not staying in this country. 

            The couple’s son, Ahamad, was born in 1988, after they both had gotten jobs and a house outside of the camp.  Forty days later, the family was in the U.S.

            “I’m not going to repeat history with my son,” Lina had vowed.  Now, though her and Mohamid’s families do not communicate, Ahamad and his sister, Dalia, both practicing Muslims, are steeped in tolerance.

            At the Hendersonville Elementary School, a dozen years ago, Dalia and a Jewish girl had been at each other’s throats constantly until their mothers brought them together in a play date at Adas’ house.  It was Ramadan, and the girlfriend fasted until sunset with the Adases.  Lina also had the girls hold hands all day, and since then, she says, “they have been best friends.”

 

Peace-bringers

 

            Both Abrams and Adas are on peaceful missions, and give talks in various venues.

            They are looking for a publisher for their Arabic edition who can reach international audiences.  If the book causes a stir, all the better, Abrams says.

            She herself had been disturbingly stirred; and had bestirred herself.  Her son had been working on the 60th floor of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, when he’d felt the first tremor.  He got out four minutes before the North Tower collapsed.  Abrams’ subsequent hatred of the Islamic terrorists—and all Muslims—led her, she says, to write “The Other Half of My Soul,” and imagine a coming together of historical antagonists.

            Subsequently, she has made herself a student of the Koran and Middle East history.  In 2011, she published “Alien at Home: Divine Intervention” a chronicle of the exodus of Elie Sutton, whose Syrian Jewish father had to export each of his seven sons out of the region to avoid ant-Semitic violence.

            Adas has put aside her journalism career to put her cooking skills to good use.  Her restaurant, Pita Express in Hendersonville, offers genuine, home-made Syrian foods, and is a gathering place.  In that space, she teaches classes in belly-dancing and in the Arabic language.  She goes out into the community to talk about diversity.

THE BOOK

The Other Half of My Soul by Bahia Abrams (Grateful Steps hardcover, 2007, 371 pages, $24).

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Bahia Abrams (l) and Lina Adas (r) at Pita Express (photo by Rob Neufeld)

 

THE EVENT AND MORE

 

Bahia Abrams talks about her book and inaugurates the Interfaith Discussion Series at Grateful Steps Bookshop, 159 South Lexington Ave., Asheville, 5:30 p.m., Jan. 17.  Call 277-0998’ or visit www.gratefulsteps.orgRescheduled for Jan. 24.

 

Pita Express is located at 1034C Greenville Highway, Hendersonville. Call 696-9818; visit pitaexpresshville.com/blog.

 

Regarding speaking engagements, contact Bahia Abrams at BahiaAbrams@aol.com and Lina Adas at w.Dove@Juno.com

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