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Glenda Council Beall updated their profile
17 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

June 1926, Asheville

One week in 1926 reveals remarkable highs and lowsby Rob Neufeld             Bootleg whiskey and golf are undermining religion, B. Frank White, a traveling preacher, told a Charlotte audience on June 2, 1926.  The sermon was reported in the Asheville Citizen the next day.            “The trouble with your…See More
Friday
Robert Beatty posted a photo

Robert Beatty

Author Robert Beatty from Asheville, NC
Tuesday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Apr 18
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Apr 18
Caralyn Davis posted an event
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Page to Podium Writers Workshop & Malaprop’s Reading With Author Mel Ryane at Unitarian Universalist Church

April 25, 2015 from 10am to 3pm
The Flatiron Writers are proud to announce an encore presentation of actor Mel Ryane’s popular Page to Podium Workshop, for writers interested in improving their public reading and self-editing skills. See testimonials from past participants here: http://www.melryane.com/p/from-page-to-podium.htmlWhen: 10:00am-3:00pm, Saturday, April 25, 2015Where: Unitarian Universalist Church, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville, NC 28801Cost: $65 per…See More
Apr 16
Caralyn Davis posted a blog post

Planet Reasonable: I'm officially an essayist at Killing the Buddha

I now have a blog, Planet Reasonable, at the lovely website Killing the Buddha. My first essay is a wee piece on religious freedom laws. Enjoy, or hate, but thanks for reading: http://killingthebuddha.com/ktblog/stop-casting-religious-freedom-stones/See More
Apr 14
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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West End Poetry and Prose Reading Series April Reading at West End Bakery

April 11, 2015 from 7pm to 9pm
4 fine writers tomorrow (Saturday April 11th) at 7pm at West End Bakery. I'll host and curate. Free event with a mix of prose and poetry and storytelling!http://www.thelaurelofasheville.com/editorial/west-end-poetry-and-prose-reading-series-invites-all-to-experience-local-voices photo credit Leah Shaipro for the LaurelSee More
Apr 10
Lockie Hunter posted a photo
Apr 10
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Ron Rash, October 28, 2014

Interview with Ron Rash, Oct. 28, 2014by Rob Neufeldon occasion of publication of Something Rich and Strangeedited version published in Asheville Citizen-Times, Nov. 2, 2014full version published on The Read on WNC, Apr. 9, 2015Photo of Ron Rash by Ulf Andersen RN:  My head is now so full of Ron…See More
Apr 9
Laura Hope-Gill posted an event

Asheville Wordfest 2015 at Asheville Lenoir-Rhyne University

May 1, 2015 at 6pm to May 2, 2015 at 9pm
Lenoir-Rhyne University presents Asheville Wordfest at its Asheville campus in downtown Asheville May 1 and 2. In its eighth year, Asheville Wordfest turns its eye on Asheville and invites community members to write about their city. Using the theme “The City Narrative / The Narrative City,” festival director and also director…See More
Apr 8
Rob Neufeld updated their profile
Apr 7
Rose Senehi posted an event

MEET THE CAST OF CHARACTER in DANCING ON ROCKS at LAKE LURE INN, LAKE LURE

April 16, 2015 from 11:30am to 2pm
Rose Senehi with be the guest speaker at a Books and Bites Luncheon about her novel, Dancing on Rocks, which takes place in Chimney Rock. Many of the characters in the book are actual residents of the town and will also be talking about how they contributed to the story. Cost: $25. Half of which goes to the Friends. Call 828-287-6392 for reservations. See More
Apr 7
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dirty Love by Andre Dubus III

Visiting author Dubus reveals swamp of loveby Rob Neufeld             The title of Andre Dubus III’s book is “Dirty Love,” not “Dirty Sex,” so you have to rethink what is meant by the word, “dirty.”            To do that, you’ve got four novellas with which to explore the lives and hearts of several not-quite-right couples…See More
Apr 5
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Vance Monument and the honoring of African American history

What’s in a monument—a complex viewby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Vance Monument and 6th County Courthouse, c. 1900           History has become a subject of special interest with proposals surrounding the renovation of the Vance monument.           …See More
Apr 4
City Lights Bookstore posted an event

Greening Up The Mountains Poetry Contest Reception at City Lights Bookstore

April 25, 2015 from 1pm to 2pm
The reception for the 2nd annual Greening Up the Mountains Poetry Contest will be at City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, April 25th at 1 p.m. Join us as the winning poets share their poems and collect their prizes.  Students from Jackson County submitted poems that celebrate our mountains and our connection to them in our everyday lives.  The response was wonderful and our judges loved reading what our local students offered. Winners will be announced soon. For any questions please call City…See More
Apr 1

Terrell Garren's new book: a definitive revision of Civil War history in WNC

Terrell Garren brings full accuracy to Civil War history

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Terrell Garren, novelist and local historian, has produced a work of scholarship that rocks the boat about the Civil War in this region, and then nails it down in its righted position.

            In 2006, he’d published a slim volume—“Mountain Myth: Unionism in Western North Carolina”—that laid out his thesis.

            Contrary to beliefs bred in the late 1860s, ingrained in families, and perpetuated in contemporary histories, Unionism was practically non-existent in the mountains by the summer of 1861.

            It wasn’t until the fall of 1863, he reveals, that locals enlisted in the Union Army, usually as deserters from the Confederate Army; and it wasn’t until after Appomattox that families claimed Unionist ties in order to get government benefits.

            “Not a single man from Henderson County joined the Union Army during the first two and a half years of the war,” Garren states in his new volume, “Measured in Blood: The Role of Henderson County, North Carolina in the American Civil War,” weighing in at 588 pages.

            In his talks, Garren gives the explanation.  “Slavery had been the main cause of the war,” he says, “but it wasn’t the reason most men fought.  Soldiers in any war are rarely aware of the politics behind their battles.” 

The nearly unanimous Confederate sentiment in the mountains, at the war’s start, had to do with homeland security.

 

The soldiers, one by one

 

            What “Measured in Blood” has motivated Garren to do is carefully consider the records and lives of each of over 2,000 Henderson County soldiers.  He’s precise about his criteria for inclusion: placement in the 1860 census; and in Henderson County regiments.

            He’s a quantifier as much as a story-teller, and highlights the sacrifices made in the horrifying war by assigning “sacrifice points” to each combatant based on wounds, sickness, death, presence in major battles, days in service, and time in prison.

            For example, there’s Private Ebenezer Henry Wheeler Girvin.

            He was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg; then ten months later at Spotsylvania Court House.  He went back to battle and was wounded in the Siege of Petersburg.  On April 19, 1865, hospital records note a gunshot wound to his head suffered at Farmville, Virginia.  By the end of the war, he was recuperating.

            Then there’s the mystery of John H. Carver.

            Carver, a private, was a member of the 1st N.C. Cavalry in J.E.B. Stuart’s Division.  Carver had fought in the Seven Days, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Second Manassas, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg battles before his ghastly race at the battle at Auburn Mills, Virginia, Oct. 14, 1863.

            When Stuart found himself flanked on both sides of a wooded hill he’d occupied, he ordered Carver’s regiment to charge through a Union formation in order to allow Stuart to escape with his force around the Federal lines.

            Thirty men came out the other side of the charge alive.  One was Carver, who stayed on his saddle despite being hit seven times.  Listed as “severely wounded,” Carver was furloughed, and then put “on detached service” at his home in the Rugby community of Henderson County.

            In April, 1864, “something went terribly wrong,” Garren writes.  The muster roll for that period states that Carver was “killed while in arrest and attempting to escape.”

            Who killed him?  If it had been Confederates mistaking him for a deserter, why would his widow have applied for a Confederate claim for deceased soldiers?

            If Union men had killed him, why did the record indicate an arrest?  No record of an arrest has been found.

            Carver emerges as one of the ultimate sacrificers in Garren’s book.

 

Desertions

 

            Another kind of mystery arises with Andrew J, Lanning, several of whose brothers served in the Confederate Army.

            Andrew, accompanied by his older brother, William, a wounded Confederate veteran, joined the 2nd N.C. Mounted Infantry (Union) in the fall of 1863 and received a bounty payment of $25 (another $75 to be paid later) on Oct. 1, 1863—that is, after Gettysburg.

            The infantry unit had been created to draw in Confederate deserters.  On Dec. 9, 1863, Lanning deserted it, never to return.  Or did he? 

            Someone named Andrew J. Lanning signed up with a new regiment, the 3rd N.C. Mounted Infantry, created by the notorious raider, Col. George W. Kirk, who inflated the bounty payment to $300.

            Oddly, the 2nd Infantry Andrew Lanning had dark eyes, hair, and complexion; was born in Henderson County; and was 20; whereas, the 3rd Infantry one was 18, had blue eyes and a fair complexion, and was born in Transylvania County, according to enlistment documents.

            The explanation, Garren says is that Kirk took kickback payments, and had to avoid Lanning being fingered as a deserter.  Lt. Col. J. Albert Smith made formal complaints about Kirk’s fraud.

            In his study, Garren backs up his summaries with spread sheets that allow readers to check his math.  He includes Union soldiers’ records and slaveholding statistics; and notes current controversies and battle and grave sites.

            “Measured in Blood” is dedicated to Barry Hollingsworth, a noted Henderson County Civil War genealogist, who passed away recently.

 

THE BOOK

Measured in Blood: The Role of Henderson County, North Carolina in the American Civil War by Terrell T. Garren (self-published hardcover, printed by Daniels Graphics, Dec. 2012, 588 pages).  It is on sale in several local independent bookstores and at the Henderson County Heritage Museum

 

THE AUTHOR

Visit Terrell Garren’s web page and blog on “The Read on WNC’ (TheReadonWNC.ning.com), and communicate with him there.

EVENTS

Terrell Garren speaks about Measured in Blood at the Henderson County Heritage Museum in the Historic Courthouse, 2 p.m., Dec. 15 (696-4879); and in Moungtain Made, Grive Arcade, Asheville, 4:30 p.m., Dec. 15 (350-0307).

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Terrell Garren checked out many battle sites, including this cliff called Rocky Face Ridge, where Henderson County soldiers had died in a battle against Gen. Sherman’s Army, May 7–13, 1864.

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