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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Tale of Ononis

The Tale of Ononis by Rob Neufeld Part 1: The Making of a Celebrity ❧  Hare Begins His Tale  Ononis was my region’s name.People now call it Never-the-same.I’ll start with the day a delivery came. The package I got was a devil’s dare,Swaddled and knotted in Swamp Bloat hairAnd bearing, in red, one word: “Beware!” Bloats are creatures from the Land of Mud Pies,Wallowing in waste with tightly closed eyesUntil fears bring tears and the bleary bloats rise.   ❧  Hare’s Colleagues  I asked my boss,…See More
Friday
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Drop Your Troubles: A Solo Storytelling Performance with Connie Regan-Blake at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

December 1, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join this internationally renowned storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she transforms a packed theater into an intimate circle of friends with old-timey charm, wisdom, and humor. We’ll also welcome the Singer of  Stories, Donna Marie Todd, who will perform her original story, “The Amazing Zicafoose Sisters.” Connie’s last two shows at BMCA have sold…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story and Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story & Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” The event will be hosted by the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, just a short drive from Asheville nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding the area. Call the Center for advance tickets (828) 669-0930 or order…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive, affirming…See More
Oct 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Oct 17
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

First Drumbeat

First Drumbeat(Part of Living Poem) The time has come.Call it a drum,Or a crumb,What’s left of life. I used to tell a jokeWhen my life was wide,And I was a stud,And not a dud—I knowI’m not a dud.  I’m a dude,A dad.  But everyone mustRebut the dud chargeAt summing up time. Oh yeah, the joke,A trademark one for meIn that it’s not funny. I used to say I’ll never retireFrom writingBecause if I’m ever…See More
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks for the prompt, Joan!  I have attached the whole work in progress as a doc at the bottom of the table of contents page: http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/special/living-poem"
Sep 22
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Is there a way from this website to print everything or might you send me such a document to bayjh@icloud.com?"
Sep 22
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
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Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Branch McDowell County Public Library

October 24, 2018 from 4pm to 5pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be launching her new poetry collection A Neighborhood Changes (Finishing Line Press, 2018) at a book presentation and signing to be held at the McDowell County Public Library in Marion on October 24.See More
Sep 21
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"This could be interesting--thanks!  I'm at 828-505-1973 (my home business office).  And RNeufeld@charter.net."
Sep 20

History of Asheville’s homeless: humanity on trial

by Rob Neufeld

PHOTO CAPTION: Jim Parton and Kirk Faulkner, two homeless men at A-Hope, where Jim is getting help finding housing and Kirk is making job connections.  Photo, 2017, by Rob Neufeld.

“I admire my daddy more than any other human on this planet,” Viola (not her real name) told me.  “He no longer admires me.” 

Now she’s homeless.  Her parents, who live on the farm where she’d grown up in these mountains, have cut her off.  Her children live with her in-laws, and she doesn’t get to see them anymore.

Viola is one of the people I met at AHOPE, a day center in Asheville that gives the dispossessed access to a shower and a phone, a place to get mail, storage facilities, a community, and help in connecting to jobs, housing, and other needs.

Viola’s backpack weighed about 40 pounds.  She wore three layers of clothing to withstand the cold spell that made shelters such as the WNC Rescue Mission and the Salvation Army’s Center of Hope declare last Tuesday and Wednesday “blue code” nights—nights on which nobody would be turned away from a sleeping place.

Viola had arrived in Asheville just a few days ago.  At AHOPE, as people were gathering for coffee and comfort, she made a friendly comment about how the guy I was talking to looked like Hagrid from “Harry Potter.”  It enabled me to introduce myself, and be gifted with her story.

“My deep, deep fear,” Viola told me toward the end of our talk, “is that happiness was not meant for me.”

This “Visiting Our Past” column looks backward from the current era of distress and fear to see the people behind the impersonal characterizations that plague them.

 

A placed called home

 

Viola grew up in a place where kids, at an early age, learned to be tough.  When she was seven, her two brothers tied her arms and legs to upper and lower bunks, chained CO2 cartridges to her, and told her they were bombs.

“I believed them.  I didn’t know what a CO2 cartridge was.  It looked like a bomb to me.  I thought, ‘I’m going to blow up.’” 

“Daddy beat the s--- out of them when he got home,” Viola added.

When she was 11, Viola ventured out with her neighbor, an older girl, who used an overnight with Viola as an excuse to sneak out with her older boyfriend.  She also hooked Viola up with her boyfriend’s buddy.

Eight miles down the road, they stopped, and Viola said, “I’m out,” and walked four miles, “barefooted because my flip-flops broke, and I got very lucky because this mail lady picked me up.”

She sneaked into her bed, and an hour later, “here comes Mamaw.  ‘Don’t you ever do that to me again!’ she said.  And it broke my heart.”

“Mamaw was my rock, shelter, and refuge,” Viola attested. When Viola’s parents fought and separated, Mamaw took Viola in with her.

Then, not long after the sneaking-out disappointment, Mamaw died—quickly, of cancer, without having picked up a cigarette in her life. 

“My whole world crashed down,” Viola said.  “She died four days before Thanksgiving, her favorite holiday.”  It “was when she could cook for everybody and the whole family could get together…We’ve never all been together since she died.”

Viola started doing drugs.  When she was 13, “someone very close to me broke my rib,” she said, “and doctors put me on pain pills,” which became an addiction, abetted by medication for broken bones she later suffered.

Viola married and had two children.  Her husband spoiled her rotten, she said, buying her clothes, jewelry and flowers.

“I was a good wife and a good mother,” she recalled.  “My kids were always clean.  They always had nice clothes…I sang them, ‘Mama Loves You’ every night…Walk, and rock, and breast-feed, and sing ‘Mama Loves You” (to the tune of “Jesus Loves You”) at night.”

Viola got a job hauling scrap metal and working on cars for her father-in-law.  She helped her father on his landscaping jobs.  Growing up, she’d shared the tasks of the family farm, with its produce, pigs, chickens, goats, and rabbits.  She had skills.

“I think rednecks are some of the most practical people you’ll ever meet because we can make something out of nothing,” Viola said.

Viola’s big downfall came when her husband started spending their money on drugs.  They separated (to later divorce); he saw other women, she suspected; and he went to prison over drugs. 

She committed a transgression that turned his family against her; and later lost her own parents’ support after she married a man who was brilliant, sexy, a petty thief, and homeless.  She’d met him at a drug rehab place.

Today, he’s in prison; and she’s on the streets alone, carrying a knife that excludes her from shelters. 

“I love deep and I love with all my heart,” Viola said.  “I forgive very easily,” which may be true for everyone but herself.

 

Two friends on the mend

 

Kirk Faulkner was living in a shack with no running water, provided by a man for whom Kirk ran a backhoe, when, one night, Kirk got hit by a truck while walking down 25/70 in Hot Springs to see his mom and sister.

The vehicle, a pick-up truck, Kirk guesses, “come out of nowhere, come off the road, and I stepped back with my left foot and they caught me on my right foot and knocked me to the ground.” 

“I went a good 10, 15 feet and hit the gravel,” he recalls.  “And then my niece just happened to come by about five minutes later and seen me in the ditch and called an ambulance; and the police came and asked who it was.  I said I have no idea.  It happened so quick and it was dark and all I seen was lights and the ground.”

Kirk was no longer able to do work for his landlord, and was evicted.

Still healing, Kirk has become homeless in Asheville, where he gets his care.  His sister is focused on caring for their mother, who is ill. 

One of the toughest things about being homeless, Kirk says, is people’s attitudes.  “Just because you dress a little different than them, they kind of walk around you…When you say, ‘Good morning,’ they just keep walking.”

At AHOPE, Kirk met with an advisor, who devoted three hours to giving Kirk help with job applications.

AHOPE also helped Jim Parton, Kirk’s new best friend, on his path to housing.

Jim had been a painter with his own company for many years, when drug addiction did him in.  Three years ago, he told himself, that’s the end, and went to Neil Dobbins, a rehab center in Asheville, and became a success story.

Neil Dobbins also diagnosed him with bipolar disorder, enabling him to manage it. 

Growing up in Pisgah View Apartments in the 1970s had been a survival story, not just because of the condition that set him apart, but also because of the environment.  He got tired of not fitting in, and getting beat up on.

When he was 12, he said, “there were two brothers who picked on me every day, and I finally got to where I was tired of that.  So they jumped me one morning and I beat both of them.

“And after I beat those two boys up, I started getting respect from people around.  So everybody had to try me out.  It seemed that I fought everybody in that project… I grew up fast.  After I started fighting, I got pretty good at it, and then I got to where I kind of enjoyed it because, I guess, it was a release thing for me.”

Through all this, there was his mother, Roxanna Louise Padgett, who called him “Sweetie” all the time, though Jim makes it clear that she was the sweetie.

“She wouldn’t preach to me,” he related, “she would just explain things.”  She helped other people, including homeless people.

This past November, Jim’s mom died, and Jim remained sober.  He was already rebuilding bridges with his children, and had found ways to deal with depression and temptation.  He prays.  “It takes 90 seconds to re-set,” he says.

“My mother wanted to see me clean and in my eyes she’s always looking down on me,” Jim confessed.

 

Rob Neufeld writes the weekly “Visiting Our Past” column for the Citizen-Times.  He is the author of books on history and literature, and manages the WNC book and heritage website, “The Read on WNC.”  Follow him on Twitter @WNC_chronicler; email him at RNeufeld@charter.net.

 

HELPING OUT

AHOPE Day Center at 19 N. Ann St. in Asheville is one of the programs of Homeward Bound, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending homelessness in Buncombe and Henderson Counties.  Visit homewardboundwnc.org.  Call the Day Center at 828.252.8883.

 

           

 

 

 

 

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