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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 1
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness at City Lights Bookstore

July 28, 2017 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Linda Star Wolf will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, July 28th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her new book, Soul Whispering: The Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness.  Master Shamanic Breathwork Practitioner, Nita Gage co-wrote the book with Linda Star Wolf. The authors explore how the art of Soul Whispering can help each of us understand why we experience our lives the way we do and shift from healing our wounds to embracing the process of transformation. This is a powerful new…See More
May 27
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
May 23
Mirra updated an event
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Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 20
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6

Fave writer dishes tastiest gumbo in new tales

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Tim Gautreaux’s stories are brilliantly inventive and as dank as gumbo served on a houseboat on a bayou.

            Folks know him from his folk-realist novels—“Next Step in the Dance,” which stars a mechanic; “The Clearing,” with its alligator-and-sawmill take on the thriller; and “The Missing,” which follows the track of an abducted girl.

             Now, we have his fourth story collection, “Signals” (Knopf), and it demonstrates how far an author can go in creating archetypes.

 

Father Grotesque

 

            “Attitude Adjustment,” first published in the December 2015 issue of “The Atlantic,” features a one-of-a-kind hero.

            Father Jim, a hulking Catholic priest, suffers burn scars, a blind eye, and memory lapses after a train had crashed into his car.  Misadventures stem from his stints as a substitute priest.  Delivering homilies and hearing confessions, he is as bizarre as Chauncey in “Being There.”

            A man comes to Jim and confesses that he visits porn sites.  “You mean,” Father Jim replies, “you visited…the studios where they film the stuff?”

            No, the man says; he just turns on the computer.  Father Jim, undeterred, recommends that the man actually visit the filming sites and see how creepy they are; how vulnerable the girls are.   “They could be,” Jim suggests, “your teenage niece.”

            The man’s niece would never do that, he says; she works at Burger King to make money for college.

            “For your penance,” Father Jim concludes, “I want you to go watch your niece…Watch the dignity of her work.”

            “Aw, can’t you just give me a rosary to say or like ten Hail Marys?” the man responds.

            In Gautreaux’s collection, the wise fool archetype pops up alongside sly foxes and swamp-stomping maidens in tall tale toppers that are superior to folk legends in that the details are so gritty. 

            Father Jim’s next episode gets hairier; and he ends up in jail.  This is hilarious.  It’s almost as if you took an Andy Griffith script and let Danny Elfman write the score.

            The question that you, as a reader, ask is “Where is Gautreaux taking us in the end?”

            In “Attitude Adjustment,” I was looking for either a realistic ending or an outrageous, laugh-in-your-face cartoon one.  Instead, we get Father Jim telling a tale to a little kids’ Bible class, coming up with morals, and then having snack time.  The story got safe all of a sudden.

 

Sentimental heart

 

            In “The Furnace Man’s Lament,” the hero is, of course, a furnace man; and the story is not so safe. 

            It’s a lament—namely, a lament for a missed opportunity at human connection.  This is a major theme for Gautreaux.

            In “Deputy Sid’s Gift,” a cop makes a man feel bad for his hard line against an alcoholic, homeless thief.  Sid demonstrates what human caring is like.  

            In “Sorry Blood,” a man with dementia gets abducted in a Walmart parking lot by a ne’er-do-well who calls him dad, brings him home, and makes him dig a drainage ditch.   

            The addled man eventually reconnects with repressed memories (his wife had died) and muses, “The only thing worse than reliving nightmares…was enduring a life full of strangers.” 

            In “Signals,” a reclusive Latvian-American teacher loses his only solace, the stereo receiver he’d brought from Latvia.  The woman who fixes it calls him out on his wretched lack of interest in life.

            “The Furnace Man’s Lament” begins with the most direct appeal to human connection.

            Mel Todd, the title character, gets a phone call about a life-and-death heater problem in the midst of a Minnesota blizzard.  His wife, Linda, who describes his heart as “starched and ironed,” asks “Who is it?”

            A stranger, Mel answers.  Linda jabs him the ribs, and says, “It’s going to be below zero tonight…You go fix it, Mel.”

            Mel discovers a 16-year-old boy living alone with his bedridden grandpa.  The boy, Jack, watches Mel closely as Mel explains mechanics. 

            The story stands out because it progresses to an ambiguous ending.  Mel ends up helping Jack—in a generous way—but not as much as his sense of rightness had instructed him; and he ultimately loses his connection with Jack.

            Gautreaux serves up this tale of conscience with plenty of suspense, including Mel’s icy slide into a highway ditch and his prospect of freezing. 

            “Are you alone,” a policeman asks, returning Mel’s cell phone call.  Mel doesn’t answer, reflecting, “I couldn’t bring myself to say that word.”

 

What fun

 

            I have been a fan of Gautreaux’s mechanics-smart heroes and heroines ever since “Last Step in the Dance,” in which Paul Thibordeaux faces death inside the antiquated boiler of a waste-processing plant.

            Paul is one those Gautreaux characters who, despite coming from a grim Flannery O’Connor version of Mike Fink’s legendary world, is truly decent.  Some of these characters are large and in-charge wives and working women.

            In “Died and Gone to Vegas,” Raynelle Bullfinch, a cook on a steam dredge, leads a game of bourré, a Louisiana spades variant.

She tells a newcomer, Nick, a young oiler, “that the only sense of mystery in her life was provided by a deck of cards.”  The players then tell big lies as Raynelle wins the big pots.  She wants to go to Vegas with her winnings.

Gambling emerges as a theme, as also in “Something for Nothing,” in which Roy Bradruff loses everything on a casino boat.  Wayne, a new casino employee, tells him that getting the big payoff is a seven-million-to-one shot; and Roy responds, “Better than no shot.”

Gautreaux delights in prose that sometimes approaches sprung poetry, such as when he describes Wayne’s experience as a lifeguard, breaking up fights between boys “driven crazy by budding subdivision girls burnished beautiful by sunshine and pool chemicals.”

            Most wonderful is Gautreaux’s mythologizing. 

            When Wayne first learns that his swimming skills are needed to respond to big losers who fear going home, he looks at the aluminum motorboat his supervisor, Mr. Joey, shows him and exclaims, “My God, we’re the suicide skiff.” 

            Mr. Joey, “running his thumb down the music of his comb,” says, “No, we’re lifeguards.”  Raymond Chandler couldn’t have cast it better.          

            Gautreaux takes this 20-page story all the way to the last paragraph before giving in to the moral of the story, voiced by the gambler’s son.  It has to do with people not being hard on themselves and everyone taking responsibility for their own lives.

            In sum, Gautreaux’s sentimentality is impressively outweighed by his choice of characters and tale-telling mastery.

 

Rob Neufeld writes the weekly book feature for the Sunday Citizen-Times.  He is the author and editor of six books, and the publisher of the website, “The Read on WNC.”   He can be reached at RNeufeld@charter.net and 505-1973.  Follow him @WNC_chronicler.


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