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Rob Neufeld posted discussions
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City Lights Bookstore posted events
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Rob Neufeld posted discussions
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City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Jenny Bennett Returns with a New Novel at City Lights Bookstore

September 5, 2014 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Sylva author, Jenny Bennett, returns to City Lights Bookstore on Friday, September 5th at 6:30 p.m. with her second book, The Twelve Streams of LeConte. The main character of the book lives in Sylva and there are scenes set in downtown, the library and even City Lights Bookstore. Anne Woodrow is on honeymoon in Scotland when fate gives her a slap in the face: right then and there, her new husband falls in love with another woman. Injured and grieving, she returns home alone and conceives of a…See More
Aug 27
Renea Winchester posted an event
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Farming, Friends and Fried Bologna Sandwiches at Available at all bookstores

September 1, 2014 all day
Mercer University is pleased to announce the release of Farming, Friends and Fried Bologna Sandwiches, by North Carolina's own Renea Winchester. This is the second in the Farmer Billy series and Winchester's third book. See More
Aug 26
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Kids Love For Animals

Kids Love For Animals ( Poem )Children’s favorite shows are of animals I have hours in a playlist that are laughable Like a camera pecking rooster and fun monkeysTo a mom and a baby miniature donkeysVideos of wild turkeys and charming geese Ducks in water and chicks learning to speak Dazzling ostrich and many free birdsSome you would not want to move towardsA large unique animal is the alligator The total opposite of the caterpillar Camels and alpacas are tall and exquisiteBut they spit at you…See More
Aug 26
Regina Illig commented on Regina Illig's event Not for Children Only:Children's Classics for Adults
"contact email is: library@buncombecounty.org"
Aug 25
Regina Illig posted an event
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Not for Children Only:Children's Classics for Adults at Pack Memorial Library

September 11, 2014 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm
SIGN UP NOW FOR "LET'S TALK ABOUT IT" BOOK DISCUSSION AT PACK MEMORIAL LIBRARYIf you'd like to learn more about great children's literature, Pack Library is offering a free "Let's Talk About It" book discussion program, Not for Children Only: Children’s Classics for Adults. This six-part series runs from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. every other Thursday beginning September 11. Participants will have the opportunity to read and discuss eight children's books, from traditional fairy tales to modern…See More
Aug 25
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Creating A Christmas Tree ( Poem )

Creating A Christmas Tree ( Poem )Create designer Christmas tree From squash, to bread, and fun cookiesInstructions made so easily One from red hat societyHome from the heart season theme Star wars made a holiday sceneWonderland can be of little lambs Making ornaments with your handsWhatever your style or budget Your personal touch can be tropicFocal point of your home can be Inspired by glamorous jewelryWe can help you get great ideas With animals and birds all right hereMy playlist has…See More
Aug 25
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Tractor Pulls

Tractor Pulls ( Poem )America’s passion tractor haul Ford and Farmall want to take it all Showcasing your tractor is never dullCase give a strong performance callSee a smokey John Deere tractor Unleash yourself in an Oliver Massey Ferguson speeds uncoveredAs International pulls with no effortWhite’s power with high tractive force As McCormick is running the course Agricultural machinery CompetitionFun family oriented tractor pullin’Opportunities may come and go You all know it’s a successful…See More
Aug 23
Mac Grady posted a photo
Aug 22
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Dan Rice, Black Mountain College artist--show and talks

Dan Rice at Black Mountain College: Painter Among The Poets An exhibition, Dan Rice at Black Mountain College: Painter Among the Poets, goes up at Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, Sept. 5, 2014, and stays up through Jan.10, 2015.  There's a free opening reception on Friday, September 5 from 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.; and it features a gallery talk by curator Brian E. Butler at 7:00 p.m. A full-color catalogue will be…See More
Aug 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

In 1937, ex-slaves in Asheville bore witness

Interviews with former slaves in Asheville strike the heartby Rob Neufeld             Every day we see and feel the beauty of the world and of humanity.  But history sometimes shows us how wrong things can go, and we wonder why we are vulnerable to such aberrations.            One of the most powerfully distressing examples of human cruelty and suffering comes from the testimony of M.L. Bost, an African American former slave who moved to Asheville from Newton, and spoke with Marjorie Jones of…See More
Aug 21
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Woodsmen Day

Woodsmen Day ( Poem)Sport using handsaws With a toothed edge blade One or two handed sawingOn a woodsmen fair dayTraditional log rolling Is a lumberjacks technique Style used in river drivingThe illustration is uniqueSpringboard tree is branchless With live action you can’t beat Platform board is dangerousA risk if you competeBlock ax chopping Is a loggers sport indeed Hard on your back swingingBe careful of your feetWoodsmen day activities Is part of the fair you see I bring it all to my…See More
Aug 21
Rob Neufeld commented on Deborah Worley-Holman's photo
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Peter McClay "M.C." Worley

"Great photo, Deborah!  Have you got some stories and details?"
Aug 18
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Aug 17

Sharyn McCrumb has new novel and talks in Montreat

by Rob Neufeld

 

            After three NASCAR-related novels, Sharyn McCrumb, author of twenty-four books, returned to the mountains in 2010 with “Devil Amongst the Lawyers.” Now, she walks these hills again with her new novel, “The Ballad of Tom Dooley.”

            “Occasionally, I get the idea that people treat me like Robert Downey Jr.,” McCrumb quipped about the glad reception she’s been getting from the publishing world.  “Instead of going to rehab for drugs, I went off into NASCAR.”

            McCrumb is the speaker at Montreat College Friends of the Library’s luncheon, Sat., June 18.  She’ll be talking about her Dooley novel, due out in September.

            I spoke with her about her book; and about her father, Frank Arwood, who had fed her with stories in her childhood.

 

R:  You’ve returned to Zeb Vance in your new novel.  He was in your 2003 novel, “Ghost Riders.”  Did you discover there was more research to be done?

 

S:  Ghost Writers really ended when the war ended.  The last thing we see is Zeb on the train. 

Actually, we did have a little bit of him afterward because he’s in Charlotte talking to Burgess Gaither, telling him that he’s got this law case in Wilkes County…He’s about to take the Tom Dooley case.

 

R:  Did you have the new novel in mind then?

 

S:  I didn’t think I was ever going to do the Tom Dooley case.  People have been asking me to do it for twenty years.  Two things.  One, everybody knows about the case.  And it’s so sordid… It’s like, “If you write this book, you’re going to have to call it, ‘Jerry Springer, Call Your Office.’  Who could you get to play these people, Courtney Love? 

 

R:  What hooked you, finally?

 

S:  “Blue Ridge Country Magazine” asked me to do an article of about 2,000 words on the case.  A friend of mine and I…went to Wilkes County, and drove around, knowing nothing but what John Foster West had said (in his book, “Lift up Your Head, Tom Dooley”).  And the thing is…no scenario that anyone had ever proposed made sense.

 

R:  What was one of your surprising discoveries for the novel?

 

S:  I went back and read the (court) transcript over and over…(Ann Melton and Tom Dooley) are sleeping together three feet away from James’ bed (Ann’s husband).

West’s opinion was that Melton was one of two things.  Either he’s like eighty-six or he is so intimidated by this returning Confederate soldier that he’s afraid to object.

Let me tell you what I found…James Melton, at the time Laura Foster was killed, which is 1866, was twenty-eight years old, younger than Brad Pitt. 

Tom, in the war, was a drummer boy.  When he wasn’t being a drummer, he was on sick call. 

James Melton carried the colors for the 26th North Carolina—Zeb’s regiment—at Gettysburg… He’s wounded in the arm and the leg in that battle…He gets wounded at Hatcher’s Run.  They put him in a military hospital.

Once you know all that, you can’t say, “The guy who carried the colors at Gettysburg is terrified of the invalid drummer boy. 

 

R:  How does it come together?

 

S:  I’ve got all these characters in my head… and all of a sudden I realize that it corresponds perfectly to Wuthering Heights

Heathcliff and Catherine are Ann and Tom.  Catherine Earnshaw married Edgar Linton to better herself, and that would be James Melton.  He’s a wagon maker with a farm.   Ann got married at fourteen to get away from her drunken mother, which leaves the person everybody thinks is so important (Laura Foster) as Isabella Linton, the girl that Heathcliff marries just to annoy Catherine.

 

R:  Who has had an influence on your storytelling ability in your life?

 

S:  My father was a good storyteller.  He gave a lot of speeches.  He never wrote anything…I think he was cast in the Zeb Vance mold.

 

R:  Do you recall one of your father’s stories?

 

S:  “Foggy Mountain Breakdown.”  It’s about twelve-year-old kids.  During the Depression, they made their own bicycles from scrap parts, and (raced) the train…You grab onto the handle of a box car, and kick your bike away from the train, and ride down the hill on the train and jump off. 

 

R:  And your father did that?

 

S:  He did that.  Yes. 

One of the kids in their gang was the son of one of the foreman at the railroad shops.  So this was a rich kid whose daddy outranks the other boys’ dads.  And he’s a bully. 

Instead of using his expensive store-bought bike to play Pony Express with the train, he takes one of the poor boy’s bikes.  And he does this every time, and sometimes he destroys their bikes. 

One day, one kid who’s really tired of being bullied files the bike chain.  It doesn’t break all the way, but it weakens it.  And the bully goes under the train.

 

R:  How old were you when you heard this story?

 

S:  Ten or twelve. 

He talked about the barnstormers that used to come after World War I, the pilots who would come to the fairgrounds and take you up for five dollars.  And the same bully was out in the field, horsing around in front of the plane. 

One of the pilots was afraid that the kid was going to get in the way of the propeller, and he went out to try to save the kid, and the bully got away, and the pilot was decapitated.

 

R:  It was the same bully?

 

S:  Yes, yes.  My father wanted to write a novel called “Missing Junior.”  This foreman’s son who was a bully—he said he wanted to follow him all the way through life and show how everything he touched, he destroyed, and got away with it.

 

R:  Where did your father teach?

 

S:  He was the chairman of the Elementary Education Department at East Carolina University. 

 

R:  When you were growing up, was he teaching at ECU?

 

S:  He went to East Carolina when I was starting the tenth grade.  For most of my childhood, from the second grade through the ninth, he was principal of an elementary school in Burlington.  That’s what he did while he was working on his PhD. 

We used to spend the summers in Chapel Hill because he had to take courses.  He had to take French and Spanish. 

He would read things out loud to me, and I got stories from French and Spanish—“The Brave Little Tailor,” I remember. 

The other thing about him was that he had that Andy Griffith way of making stories folksy.  When I was four, he started this long bedtime story—and it was The Iliad!  Can you picture The Iliad with Andy Griffith telling it? 

“Once there was a shepherd boy named Paris, and his daddy was Priam, King of Troy.  And his parents were sitting out there in the pasture, and these three beautiful women showed up.  And they were goddesses!  And they had an apple, and they had a contest going.”

 

CAPTION FOR TOP PHOTO

Sharyn McCrumb at the Whippoorwill Museum in Wilkes County, North Carolina, with the fiddle of Tom Dula.  Photograph by: Randy Joyner.

 

EVENT 

Sharyn McCrumb speaks in Gaither Fellowship Hall at the Montreat College Friends of the Library luncheon, Sat., June 18, 12 noon.  She will discuss her upcoming novel, which is based on the true story behind the legend of Tom Dooley.  Friends membership is $15; and the program is $10 per ticket; $15 with the luncheon.   Call 669-8012, end_of_the_skype_highlightingExt. 3504.

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