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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Rob Neufeld's 2 discussions were featured
Friday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Citizen science author in Asheville April 6

Eco author in Asheville April 6 Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson…See More
Friday
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
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Appalachian Authors Book Signing and Reading at Historic Carson House

April 8, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author and reader at the Appalachian Authors  Book Signing and Reading to be held at the Historic Carson House on Saturday, April 8 from 10-3. She will debut her new poetry collection A Part of Me. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.See More
Thursday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Wednesday
Gary Carden posted a video

2012 Award Winner for Literature -- Gary Neil Carden

A literature and drama teacher turned storyteller, Gary Neil Carden is an award winning playwright whose tales are informed by mountain life in North Carolin...
Wednesday
Gary Carden updated their profile
Wednesday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Stories of Asheville's homeless

History of Asheville’s homeless: humanity on trialby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Jim Parton and Kirk Faulkner, two homeless men at A-Hope, where Jim is getting help finding housing and Kirk is making job connections.  Photo, 2017, by Rob Neufeld.“I admire my daddy more than any other human on…See More
Mar 20
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Writers at Home at Malaprops at Malaprops

March 19, 2017 from 3pm to 5pm
A.K. Benninghofen, Lockie Hunter and Beth Keefauver will offer a free reading at the next installment of the Writers at Home series, presented by UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program (GSWP), at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 19, at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood Street in Asheville. This monthly series of free readings is hosted by GSWP director and novelist Tommy Hays.See More
Mar 19
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 18
Susan Weinberg posted an event

Reading by Poet Bianca Spriggs at Three Top Room, Plemmons Student Union, App State University

March 30, 2017 from 7:30pm to 8:45pm
A reading by poet, multi-genre artist, and core member of the Affrilachian Poets Bianca Spriggs in the Hughlene Bostian Frank Visiting Writers Series at Appalachian State. Spriggs will also present a craft talk from 12:30-1:45 in the Price Lake Room of the Plemmons Student Union. Free admission.For more info, see the press release http://www.news.appstate.edu/2017/03/06/bianca-spriggs/Parking info is at parking.appstate.edu.…See More
Mar 17
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Mar 14
Toby Hill posted a blog post

Hester

HESTER      Growing up in Asheville,  N.C. in the 50’s and 60’s seemed, at the time, to be filled with a rhythm of adventure and strange encounters sprinkled with an assortment of particularly interesting and somewhat odd characters. One of those persons who fascinated me as a child was my father’s friend “Hester. “       My dad was about as straight an arrow as anyone could find. He seemed to a preadolescent, somewhat indolent son, frankly boring. Looking back from a perspective of 70 years, I…See More
Mar 11
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

African-American musicians in Asheville

African-American musicians flourished in Asheville neighborhoodsby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: The Outcasts, the state’s Battle of the Bands winner in 1979, included: (kneeling l to r) Edward Stout, saxophonist; Darriel Jones, drummer; (seated) Patricia McAfee, vocalist; (standing l to r) Marvin Seabrooks, trombonist; Mike…See More
Mar 11
Tipper posted a blog post

Blind Man's Bluff

According to the Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore, the game Blind Man's Bluff is as old as the 16th Century. It was a game I never liked playing as a kid. I was always afraid someone would get hurt-namely me! Its one of those games that makes grown-ups yell things like "Somebodys going to…See More
Mar 9
Mary-Chris Griffin shared Rob Neufeld's discussion on Facebook
Mar 6
Bob Plott replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Hunters and Plott hounds
"Thanks for sharing this Rob--and the book plug too. I have never seen this photo before. I have several others from the 1942 article, but this was a new one. The man on the truck looking down is WWII hero Little George Plott--who I profiled in my…"
Mar 6

Atheist believes in genies, novel reveals

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Salman Rushdie’s latest novel—“Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights” (1,001 nights)—has permitted me to come up with a headline as wild as the one above because the book is so exuberantly and infectiously surreal.

            The novel, set in the future, looks back at the present time, when a worldwide cataclysm has opened a barrier that has existed between humans and spirits for a millennium; and all kinds of genies are popping up with their own agendas.

            In one scene, Dunia, a female genie, or jinnia, as Rushdie spells it, comes to Mr. Geronimo, an inexplicably levitated man floating above his bed, and informs him, “The fairy world is real...but it does not follow that God exists.  On that subject I am as skeptical as you.”

            Meanwhile, outside the bedroom, malicious jinn (that’s the plural form of the Arabic word) are making monstrous war on humans at the behest of Ghazali, a millennium-dead radical fundamentalist.  Religion has suddenly become wildly popular.

            “Just as I suspected,” Ghazali says.  “Fear drives men to God.”

 

Check out the no-earlobe guys

 

            The above subhead was another attention-getter I considered for the main headline because I found it hard to get over the fact that the descendants of Dunia and her 12th century human lover, the philosopher, Ibn Rushd, are genetically marked by earlobe-lessness

            Ibn Rushd, by the way, is a real historical figure, otherwise known as Averroes, who sought to reconcile the Muslim religion with reason—in opposition to Ghazali, who sought to demonstrate the failings of reason.

            You’ve got to love the way Rushdie loves up his namesake—flabby old body and all—totally in line with his main theme.  But the no-earlobe thing, it seems forced, like the sticking-out pinky-fingers that aliens couldn’t hide in the 1960s TV show, “The Invaders.”

            Rushdie doesn’t reference “The Invaders,” but his fertile mind introduces dozens of other cultural icons, both scholarly and pop, into the narrative.  If you’re going to go through the looking glass like Alice (who is referenced), you might as well have the time of your life seeing familiar names in odd contexts.

            During “The War of the Worlds”—the apocalyptic battle between dark jinn and Dunia’s humanized brood—absurdity reigns.  Not just Geronimo’s feet-off-the-ground problem, but also a baby that causes skin rot on knaves, a giant that bites off a man’s head like Saturn in the Goya painting, and many other jaw-dropping unrealities.

            “In a French town the citizenry began turning into rhinoceroses.” (That’s a Eugene Ionesco reference.)  “A Russian official lost his nose and then saw it walking around St. Petersburg by itself.” (That’s from a Nicolai Gogol story.)  A Spanish lady has her eyeball sliced while gazing at the moon; and ants crawl out of a hole in a man’s palm. (Both of those things occur in Luis Buñuel’s film, “Un Chien Andalou.”)

            These impossibilities are the result of jinnterferrence.  (I am allowed to use such wordplay because Rushdie does, too, as in his adjective describing people who have lost their homeland and identity: “Lebanonymous.”)

            You have to admire all the tools that Rushdie puts at his disposal, including humor.

            Hugo Casterbridge, a composer and essayist who has gone from being an atheist to a believer in divine retribution, publishes an article that reinterprets the Bible.

            “On the day that Adam and Eve invented god,” Casterbridge writes, “they at once lost control of him.”  God was furious.  “‘How did you come up with the idea of me,” (God) demanded, “who asked you to do that?’ and he threw them out of the garden, into, of all places, Iraq.”

            Rushdie’s style—some call it postmodernism; some, magical realism—is right for the times.  We are inundated with information, stunned by how history is going, and needing to capture people’s attention, so we better come up with a form that clicks.

            “These are days of miracle and wonder,” Paul Simon sings—and we might add, Instagram and Tinder, which means I better make every sentence of this review a humdinger or a come-on, or else I’ll lose audience.

 

Atheist believes in genies

 

            I return to the headline because I have to explain such a blatant statement.

            Why would a non-believer in what he sees as destructive self-delusion employ fairy tales and genies in his parable?  The answer is: How else are we to defeat unreason and fanaticism?

            You can see the solution that Rushdie is heading toward.  “When you’re fighting monsters, it’s good to have a few monsters on your side,” Rosa Fast, the mayor of New York tells Jimmy Kapoor, the earlobe-less graphic artist who has become her magic-zapping body guard.

            The monster v. monster formula is akin to the two dinosaurs destroying each other in “Jurassic Park.”  Rushdie knows there’s a problem with this plot resolution because he covers his bases.

            When Teresa Saca Cuartos, one of Dunia’s descendants and deputies, can’t control her otherwise useful murderousness, Rushdie writes, “Rage, no matter how profoundly justified, destroys the enraged.” 

            So, if you’re a jinni named Dunia, leading the war against the four jinn of the Apocalypse, and you’re fueled by vengeance, you may be resorting to the only way to defeat evil, but how can you expect a good society to come out of it?

            Rushdie does expect that, at least in this novel.   He needs to hold up the lamp and show that reason can triumph.  I have a few problems with that.

 

Three reasons

 

            First of all, the opposition of reason and faith is a false one, I think.  It may make sense when it takes the form of scientists and democracies vying to eradicate barbarous religious zealots.  But the issue is more complex in non-extreme cases.

            Fanatics’ appropriation of religious faith for war-mongering does not invalidate faith in the same way that the use of nuclear power and the Internet for bombs and spying does not invalidate science.

            The problem is not in religion or science, but in how they’re used.  Eugenics: enough said.

            Second of all, Rushdie's clash-of-titans ending is a metaphysical and not a psychological resolution.  No matter how humanized the figures in a metaphysical novel are, the book is going to be intellectual and symbolic.

            The most psychological episode in “Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights” occurs when Dunia opens up a story box that is layered like an onion and which had already poisoned her father.

            She is soon flooded with self-doubts, most devastatingly about her father, who had never shown her love and who was disgusted by her half-human children. 

            “In my unhappiness,” Dunia thinks, “I persuaded myself that my father’s disdain for his daughter was the natural state of affairs, the healthy state, and my female nature was the plague.  But here we are at the truth, and it is he who is sick and I who am well.  What is the poison in his body?  Maybe it is himself.”

            Geronimo, who is by Dunia’s side at the moment, also plunges into despair, thinking about his late wife, who, he realizes loved her father more than she ever could love him.

            A lot of the psychological crises in the novel involve father issues, and you begin to wonder if this is good symbolic writing, for it is God our Father who is being overthrown in the larger sense.

            Third of all, we can’t root out what we call evil nature from good nature.  Carl Jung is not referenced in the novel, but he would say that our shadow selves work with our loving selves to create our hope for humanity, and that is, integrated selves.

            Rushdie is a brilliant person.  He knows this; and because he does, he adds a twist at the very end that makes his 1,000-year hence Utopia look a little less utopian.  Though it seems a little like an oops-I-got-carried-away-with-amazing-storytelling, one thing you can conclude is that the new novel is very thought-provoking.

AUTHOR EVENT

Sir Salman Rushdie gives a free public talk at UNC Asheville’s Kimmel Arena, 7 p.m., Thurs., Feb. 18.  His lecture is titled “Public Events, Private Lives: Literature + Politics in the Modern World.”  UNC Asheville will also present four companion events the week of Rushdie’s talk.  Call 251-6674.

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