Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

susannah eanes commented on Rob Neufeld's blog post The Invention of Nature, an inspiring book--author Andrea Wulf at Malaprop's May 1
"So chuffed about this! Sadly, I won't be there except in spirit. Andrea Wulf is a force of nature, herself. Her amazing work The Brother Gardeners should be made into a feature-length film - the characters live and breathe again between the…"
17 hours ago
Evelyn Asher updated their profile
18 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

The Invention of Nature, an inspiring book--author Andrea Wulf at Malaprop's May 1

Author of key book of our times comes to AshevilleAndrea Wulf makes Malaprop's Bookstore one her stops, Sun., May 1, 3 p.m., in talking about her thrilling work of non-fiction, The Invention of Nature: Alexander von…See More
19 hours ago
Rob Neufeld's discussion was featured

Salman Rushdie to Asheville with new novel

Atheist believes in genies, novel revealsby Rob Neufeld             Salman Rushdie’s latest novel—“Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights” (1,001 nights)—has permitted me to come up with a headline as wild as the one above because the book is so exuberantly and infectiously…See More
Monday
Julia Nunnally Duncan updated their profile
Monday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Apr 23
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

8th Annual Blue Ridge Bookfest Apr 22-23

The 8th Annual Blue Ridge Bookfest brings authors to Flat Rock There are a few oases where writers congregate to share wares and wisdom, and Apr. 22-23, the place is Blue Ridge Community College, featuring 19 readings and workshops, and many more opportunities for conversations with authors at exhibition tables.  See full schedule at…See More
Apr 20
Toby Hill posted a blog post

Asheville- The Way I Remember It- Hester

I have posted a new blog about a man I knew growing up in Asheville. It is entitled " Hester." Anna says guys will like it better than women. It's pretty long, but enjoy it.HESTERGrowing up in Asheville in N.C. in the 50’s and 60’s seemed, at the time, to be filled with a rhythm of adventure and strange encounters sprinkled with an assortment of particularly interesting and somewhat odd characters. One of those persons who fascinated me as a child was my father’s friend “Hester. “ My dad was…See More
Apr 19
Frank Thompson posted an event
Thumbnail

Frank Thompson at Yancey History Association

April 19, 2016 at 6pm to April 19, 2017 at 7pm
There is a permanent exhibit at the Yancy History Association in Burnsville devoted to the film "Then I'll Come Back to You" (1916) which was produced in nearby Pensacola. It's a small exhibit but well curated and filled with great photographs and other memorabilia of this century-old film.See More
Apr 19
Sharon Freeman Pace replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Jerry Steinberg--Asheville history, contrarian views, new book
"In the 60's, early 70's, one of my uncles on my mothers side worked as a groundskeeper for Mr. Sternberg. I remember our driving up to the "castle" and my sister asking my aunt where the moat was.I also remember touching the…"
Apr 19
nancy dillingham replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Interview with Ron Rash on occasion of 2016 Selected & New Poems
"A wonderful discussion on craft, Rob!"
Apr 17
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Apr 16
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Ron Rash on occasion of 2016 Selected & New Poems

Something unseen stirs the words in Ron Rash poemsby Rob Neufeld             Ron Rash, award-winning novelist and short story writer, is also an acclaimed and accomplished poet.  His new book, “Poems: New and Selected” (HarperCollins) draws from six volumes and adds eight new poems.  He comes to Malaprop’s…See More
Apr 15
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Fred Chappell to Present His New Fantasy Novel at City Lights Bookstore

May 13, 2016 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Poet and novelist, Fred Chappell will return to City Lights Bookstore on Friday, May 13th at 6:30 p.m. to read from and sign his new fantasy novel. In A Shadow All of Light, a young man sets off on a journey to become the apprentice of a master shadow thief. His mysterious master challenges him with difficult mental and physical tests, setting in motion adventures with con men, monsters, ingenious detection, cats, and pirates.Fred Chappell is a former professor of English at the University of…See More
Apr 12
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

A Shadow of All Light by Fred Chappell

Literary master evokes classic fantasy taleby Rob Neufeld             Let’s say you’re going to a book fair, and a guy with a long grey beard and glittering eye stops you at the entrance.  He points to worn and rebound books he’s laid out on a table: Gulliver’s Travels; The Story of Sir Launcelot; The Three…See More
Apr 10
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Courtney Lix Presents Her History of Women in the Smokies at City Lights Bookstore

May 6, 2016 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Courtney Lix will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, May 6th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her book Women of the Smokies which chronicles the women who contributed to making the Smokies what we know today. She will share some of the stories of these women and sign books. To reserve copies please call City Lights Bookstore at 828-586-9499.See More
Apr 9

Ron Rash’s novel, “The Cove” goes to a dark place

by Rob Neufeld

See also critique of NY Times and Washington Post reviews

 

            On page 4 of Ron Rash’s new novel, “The Cove,” one already has to worry about spoiler alerts.

            Rash has never stinted on opening scenes.  His 2004 novel, “Saints at the River,” starts with a drowning girl’s stream-of-consciousness.  “Serena,” his 2008 novel, soon a movie, begins with a knife fight.  “The Cove” also grabs fast.

            A TVA agent, checking out land for a reservoir, enters “the cove” of the title—a dark, accursed place in fictionalized Madison County—and makes a shocking and mysterious discovery. 

The novel then tells the pre-story, which takes place in 1918 and involves the internment of German prisoners at Hot Springs.  Not until the last pages is the opening mystery resolved.

 

People will talk

 

            People will talk—not just the characters in the book, who spread fear about the heroine and Germans, but also readers, who’ll imagine alternate endings to Rash’s tale of hate and love.

            In “The Cove,” Rash masterfully poises suspense elements; and gives full reign to other strengths: language; awe; symbolism; cast of characters; and mountain knowledge.

Laurel Shelton, the young woman who lives with her brother on their late parents’ farm, walks through the woods and glimpses Carolina Parakeets, the flocking beauties shot to extinction by farmers.

            Walking to the cornfield, she feels the cliff looming above her.  “There wasn’t a gloamier place in the whole Blue Ridge,” her mother had said.  The cove was “a cursed place…where ghosts and fetches wandered.”

            Shadow-land is a distinctive feature of this region’s literature.  In “Christy,” Catherine Marshall’s 1967 novel, bright-spirited Fairlight Spencer feels oppressed by the darkness of the mountains that enclose her cove in east Tennessee.

            “Christy, holp me,” she cries, as the sun vanishes behind the mountains just as typhoid snuffs her light.  “The shadder’s after me.”

 

Fairyland

 

            Laurel follows the parakeets to the discovery of a ragged young flautist camping out on her mountain.  His playing is otherworldly; he’s a mute.  Laurel doesn’t yet know that he has escaped from the prison camp.

            Dreamily, she goes back to the only sunny spot in the cove—a ledge—to retrieve her brother Hank’s shirt, drying on the rock. 

Then, “a purple butterfly lit on the stream edge to sip water.  A pretty hue, most anyone would say…Just not pretty on white skin,” Laurel reflects, thinking about her birthmark, which she had once tried to efface.

            Regarding accursedness, cursors pointed at Laurel in a few ways: her residence in the bad place; a history of calamities happening around her; her birthmark, which made it easy for people to shun her; and, ultimately, exceptional loneliness.

            “Laurel felt she herself might be a ghost.  Did a ghost even know it was a ghost?”

            You would classify Rash’s writing as “realism”—real people, hard times, clearly rendered details—but you could not dismiss the feeling of fairyland.

            Characters pass through the cove and see signs: fallen chestnut trees, blighted like much else; a bottle tree with charms; gravestones; pools.

            The book’s water imagery alone, tugging at many places, indicates how “The Cove” works strongly on two levels.  It fulfills Rash’s interest in sustaining, in a novel, the revelation and sound of his poetry.

 

World War I

 

            Hank’s shirt is cut off at one arm to fit his amputation, suffered at war.  Walter’s muteness is another kind of wartime loss.  Other characters, walking the streets of Mars Hill and participating in the drama in the cove, show scars.

            Tilman Estep, a cynical veteran, had lost one eye overseas.  Old Slidell Hampton, the Sheltons’ neighbor and friend, is haunted by a Civil War memory that stands out as a stunning one-page story within the novel.  Sgt. Chauncey Feith, the gung-ho home front recruiter, is branded by his fear of being deemed a coward.

            During a trip to Asheville, Chauncey stops in on the stone cutter, W.O. Wolfe, Thomas’ father, and imagines the unveiling of his own monument.

            At the ceremony, Chauncey would call his future wife to his side, and she “would turn to the crowd and talk about how Senator Chauncey Feith had dedicated his life to serving his country.” 

            Chauncey’s fantasy puts him in a different class from Serena.  The protagonist of “Serena” is a mythological fulfillment of world domination.  Chauncey’s demon is more modest—vanity and meanness disguised as patriotism.

 

Undercurrents

 

            Laurel’s fantasy life is as pure a romance as you can find.  And she’s smart in many ways—as a student, woodswoman, detective, and strategist.  But her mountain isolation makes her a spirit of nature, and a votary to beauty.

            After taking Walter to her and Hank’s home to heal him from a fever, she returns to the outcrop to get Walter’s haversack, and reconnects with her refuge.

            “Up here,” Rash writes, “the wide shelf of granite gathered the sun’s light and held it, swaddled Laurel in its brightness…Dewdrops on a spider’s web held whole rainbows inside them and a fence lizard’s tail shone blue as indigo glass.”

Laurel’s love scenes are tender and believable.  “The Cove” is Rash’s sexiest book.

            Walter’s feelings and history come out in the novel, but not his fantasies as much as they might if the novel had had space to explore them.  We hear his music, but not his musician’s mind.

            At 255 pages, “The Cove” is a crafted gem.  It’s a book you could read again to savor the writing.  Rash has found a subject that compellingly represents his vision—beauty shadowed by foreboding; and he’s made it symphonic.

 

BOOK REVIEWED

The Cove by Ron Rash (HarperCollins: Ecco hardcover, Apr. 2012, 255 pages, $26.99).

 

SEE THE AUTHOR

Ron Rash’s 29-stop book tour for his new novel, “The Cove,” includes these local stops:

 

Fri., 7 p.m.
Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St. Asheville (254-6734).

 

Sat., 2 p.m.

Blue Ridge Books, 152 S. Main St., Waynesville (456-6000).

 

Sun., April 15, 2 p.m.
Jackson County Library Community Room, Sylva (586-9499).

 

Thurs., May 24, 7 p.m.
Hub City Bookshop, Spartanburg County Public Library, 151 N. Church St., Spartanburg.

 

Thurs. May 24, 12 noon

The Lazy Goat, Greenville, for “Book Your Lunch,” $55 ticket (864-675-0540).

Views: 342

Reply to This

© 2016   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service