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Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Juniper Bends and Topside Press present: Where We're Going We Don't Need Roads at The Crow & Quill

October 8, 2014 from 8pm to 10pm
This fall the best new transgender fiction is going on a road trip! Topside Press authors Casey Plett (author of A Safe Girl To Love) and Sybil Lamb (author of I’ve Got A Time Bomb) will be crisscrossing Canada and the United-States. Asheville is hosting these Topside authors with the help of Juniper Bends Reading Series, and The Crow & Quill. Join us on Wednesday, October 8th at 8 pm to hear the work of these two …See More
8 hours ago
Randolph Wilson replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Place-names salute us in a revised gazetteer
"I was born on Bill's Creek...the son of Roland and Jeanette Frady Wilson. I spent my first 18 years on the old Frady farm on Bill's Creek. We lived with my Grandfather and Grandmother....Dewey Frady and Diza Hall Frady. I remember…"
9 hours ago
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Saturday
Sue Diehl posted an event

Rose Senehi with Montreat College Friends of the Library at Bell Library at Montreat College

November 2, 2014 from 3pm to 5pm
Rose Senehi, author of Dancing on Rocks, will discuss her most recent novel in the Blue Ridge Mountain series on Sunday afternoon, November 2, 2014 at 3:00 p.m in Montreat College Bell Library.  Public is invited. Refreshments will be served.See More
Thursday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

A contemporary tour of Asheville 1916

Walk through Asheville, spring 1916by Rob Neufeld                       You will be impressed by how clean the streets are.  It wasn’t that way twenty years earlier, when Patton Ave. got muddy in wet weather; horses had to be swept after; and women feared going downtown because their long skirts…See More
Sep 23
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Vintage Postal Stamp ( Poem )

Vintage Postal Stamp ( Poem )Turn of the century Vintage Stamps Traceable history make value enhancePrices get higher as the years go by Dream of finding one valued so highExtremely fine with the perfect gum Designer flaws bring high premiumFamous from error illustration Collection of art inspirationWe are crazy for detailed graphics Finding rare depends on the marketsUnused are the old collectibles Their worth can be unbelievableView history with a new focus My playlist is something to…See More
Sep 23
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Harnees Racing ( Poem )

Harness Racing ( Poem )Horses pull a two wheeled cart If it breaks you will departPlace a bet before it starts Good wager wins if played smartRiders ready at the gate Fans no longer have to waitAthlete sport with high speed Is a skill you surely needAt times a horse can fall down Sad to see that come aroundLast turn has crowd in a roar We wait to hear close end scoreIf your looking to explore My playlist has so much more…See More
Sep 21
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at The MACA building

October 11, 2014 from 9:30am to 1pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell Arts Council Association (MACA) booth at the Mountain Glory Festival in downtown Marion on Saturday, October 11. Julia will sign her books from 9:30-1 p.m. The MACA booth is located outside the MACA building at 50 South Main Street, Marion.See More
Sep 17
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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West End Poetry and Prose Reading series at West End Bakery

September 13, 2014 from 7pm to 9pm
Join us at West End Bakery for our 1st FREE Fall reading of 2014. This will be a marvelous family-friendly evening of prose, poetry, and storytelling featuring your favorite local Asheville writers. The lineup includes:  Tom Chalmers  Caleb Beissert  Beth Keefauver  Kim Winter…See More
Sep 13
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Story of Land and Sea by Katy Simpson Smith

Wounded hearts, changed minds in 18th century Beaufortby Rob Neufeldpublished in the Asheville Citizen-Times, Sept. 14, 2014             As a symbol of hope—or hopelessness—or accommodation (it depends on the story line), there’s nothing like the intelligent woman marooned on a patriarchal, slave-owning Southern…See More
Sep 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Sep 11
Sharyn McCrumb updated their profile
Sep 10
Sharyn McCrumb posted an event
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Sharyn McCrumb's Novel "Nora Bonesteel's Christmas Past" at Belk Library, Appalachian State University, Boone NC

October 6, 2014 from 6pm to 8pm
 Scripture cake, book signings, and the real Nora Bonesteel herself. On Oct. 6, ASU in Boone is hosting the book launch for "Nora Bonesteel's Christmas Past" (Abingdon, Oct., 2014) with a program of storytelling, featuring author Sharyn McCrumb and storyteller Charlotte Ross, the inspiration for the character of Nora.See More
Sep 10
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Sep 9
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

What will make you go to a history museum?

What attracts you to history museums?I've posted three history exhibits that are currently up in the area--one on the hillbilly stereotype; one of photographs of child labor; and one on African-American education in the area (see news)--and it made me wonder:What would make you go see an exhibit in a history museum?This information would be of GREAT HELP to curators.Here…See More
Sep 9
Spellbound posted an event
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Weekly Story Time at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

September 13, 2014 from 11am to 11:30am
Free weekly story time for ages 3 to 7 (or thereabouts) every Saturday morning 11-11:30amSee More
Sep 6

Ron Rash keynotes Spring Literary Festival----his poetry reveals his career

Ron Rash’s celebrated career can be viewed through his poetry 

Author keynotes literary festival

by Rob Neufeld

 

            In his early 40’s, Ron Rash published his first two books, “The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth,” stories; and “Eureka Mill,” a book of poems.

            With a movie based on his best-selling novel, “Serena,” in the works, and ten other acclaimed books in circulation, it’s safe to say that Rash has been having a sensational midlife.

            Rash engages in an audience participation author show at Western Carolina University, Mar. 20, on the third day of the 10th Annual Spring Literary Festival.

 

Images like icons

 

            Rash writes in three forms—novels, short stories, and poems.  With his poetry, he gives us his most worshipful and private self, as when he dwells on an image.

            “Tonight I hold the photograph lightward,/ try to read my grandfather’s face,” Rash relates in his poem, “September, 1957,” published in his book, “Eureka Mill.”

            Images are like icons to Rash in his work.  “Serena” owes its birth to a vision of a woman on a horse atop a ridge, Rash has said.

            The photograph of his grandfather in the poem connects Rash to one of the biggest apprehensions in his life, the fate dealt mountain farmers who moved to mill towns.

“I sit on the porch steps, watch/ my grandfather lean his cancered body/ against the back of Alec Price’s Ford,” Rash begins, entering the photo.

            Fellow mill-workers have just barged in on grandma and carried grandfather out of his sick bed to their big fish catch in the truck back.  Grandma finally goes along with the disturbance and takes the photo, which the poet holds, seeing behind the smoke of his grandfather’s cigarette, “a grimace of pain or a grin./  It is the one sure thing/ I cannot remember.”

 

Believing

 

            There are no mills in Rash’s second book of poems, “Among the Believers,” set in the mountains with his pre-mill kin.

            Rash was teaching at Tri-County Technical College, near Clemson, while writing “Believers.” He dedicated it “in memory of my father James Hubert Rash—believer.”

            James Rash got his GED and teacher’s degree while working full-time at Eureka Mill, and thus climbed his family out of that trap.  Memories of country life, as much as a healthy paycheck, had been in James’ mind.

            “I rose with the moon, left the drowsy sheets,/ my nine months wife singing in her sleep.” Rash begins his poem, “Plowing on Moonlight,” taking on his father’s persona in the moment of tending to his fields.

            Rash takes on many personae in his writing, most of them not his family.  “The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth,” for instance, brings together a gathering of resettled mountaineers talking about obsolescence and destiny.

            Rash’s father, in the poem, represents a communion with nature through work. 

            “All night/ I plowed, limbs pebbled, beard budded by frost,/ my chest nippled, my breath blooming white,/ and knew again the sway of the sea,/ the flow of river, the smallest creek,/ rain’s pelt and soak, the taproot’s thrust,/ the cicada’s winged resurrection.”

            “Among the Believers” ranges wide.  It taps into Celtic cadences with a translation from “The Mabinogian,” a Welsh epic.  Sea warriors, returning home, recall dead kinsmen, “woes of ages, old wounds, heart grief.”

            Two other poems dwell on the Shelton Laurel Massacre in Madison County, the focus of Rash’s 2006 novel, “The World Made Straight.”  Mountain religion fuses with nature and ancestry in many entries.

 

The drowned

 

             “Beneath Keowee,” a poem in “Among the Believers,” visits the ghost world at the bottom of the dammed lake between Tri-County College and Lake Jocassee.  Jocassee rises from burial at the beginning of Rash’s third book of poems, “Raising the Dead.”

           “Rent a boat,” the poet tells readers of his poem, “Under Jocassee.”  “Soon/ you’ll see as through a mirror/ not a river but a road flowing beneath you./  Follow that road.”

            Passing a graveyard, a house, and a barn, “cut the motor and drift/ back sixty years and remember/ a woman who lived in that house” and the day she looked up, as she might be doing now, at “something dark (that) has come over her.”

            That same image haunts the story, “Not Waving but Drowning,” in Rash’s second volume of stories, “Casualties” (2000).

            The narrator is in a hospital waiting room where his wife, Mary, is about to suffer a miscarriage, her second in their marriage.  There with him is a millworker and his wife with busted teeth.

           The narrator recalls when his and Mary’s new child had been conceived, on a boating trip on Lake Jocassee.  They’d looked into the water and saw, “Eighty feet down were farmhouses Duke Power hadn’t bothered to raze when they’d built the dam.”

           “It’s like if you watched long enough,” Mary had said, “somebody would walk out of one of those houses and look up and wave.”

            The ghosts of that displaced community are like the ghost of a miscarried child.  “You carry that pain inside like a tumor, and though it may shrink with time, it never disappears, and it’s malignant.”

            Rash’s first novel, “One Foot in Eden,” a multiple award-winner, takes place in the Jocassee valley as its drowning approaches.  The drowning—of an industrialist’s daughter—kicks off Rash’s second novel, “Saints at the River,” with the girl’s last thoughts.  There’s a drowning in “Serena,” too—at a logjam in a millpond.

 

Personal religion

 

            All of Rash’s previous favorite subjects come together in his fourth and most recent book of poems, “Waking,” where it seems that their weft is imbued with a greater strength, something like a personal religion.

            Religion has many aspects, including humility and service to people less fortunate than oneself.

            In the story, “Honesty,” published in Rash’s 2007 volume, “Chemistry and Other Stories,” a writer with writer’s block takes his wife’s suggestion and answers a singles ad to write about the lovelorn.

            As it turns out, the woman, Lee Ann, whose incarcerated husband continues to threaten to kill her, learns about his ruse and forgives him.

            “Somehow, despite all this,” she tells him as they part, “I still think you’re a good person.”  He could see loving this demeaned person in an alternate life.  “No, I’m not,” he says.

            The bonds between people are particularly heartful or heart-rending, in Rash work, when a father and child are involved.

            The father in the poem, “The Reaping,” published in “Waking,” does not “need an owl cry or his wife’s/ linger by window to know/ what keeps  his son in the field’s/ gathering darkness.”

            The boy, who had a bad habit of taking short cuts, had been working the hay baler.  The father “frees an arm from the roller/ chides his son for half a life/ lost to save half a minute,/ before kissing the cold brow,/ forgives what the reaper cannot.”

            Rash’s most recent book of short stories, “Burning Bright,” won the Frank O’Connor Award for best story collection in the world in 2010.  His upcoming novel, “The Cove” (Ecco/Harper Collins, Apr. 2012), reveals love, beauty, and anti-German hatred in the mountains during World War 1.

 

SEE RASH & AUTHORS AT FESTIVAL

 

Ron Rash engages in an audience participation author show, emceed by Rob Neufeld, 8 p.m., Tues., Mar. 20 in UC Theater, Western Carolina University.  Twelve other noted authors are featured over five days.  See the schedule at www.litfestival.org; or call 227-7264.

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