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East Asheville history and sites

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Feb 27.

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

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Kathryn Hall posted a blog post

Aim for Beauty

In honor of my blog Plant Whatever Brings You Joy's 10th Blogiversary I've posted a chapter from my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden. This particular chapter was also excerpted in Fairview's GreenPrints magazine, which was greatly appreciated. Read more here: http://plantwhateverbringsyoujoy.com/aim-for-beauty/…See More
Sep 11
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

McCrumb ghost-opened world in The Unquiet Grave

McCrumb sees stories behind haunting ghost by Rob NeufeldPHOTO: Sharyn McCrumb and her dog Arthur, 2017.  Photo by Laura Palmer, courtesy, Sharyn McCrumb In “The Unquiet Grave,” Sharyn McCrumb once again demonstrates her mastery at turning a folktale into something larger, different, and greater.The legend of the…See More
Sep 10
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

James Vestus Miller

­HISTORIC PHOTO James Vester Miller James Vester Miller had been a boy when his mother, a Rutherfordton slave, had responded to Emancipation by taking her three children to Asheville and getting a job as a cook in a boardinghouse—some say Julia Wolfe’s boardinghouse, Old Kentucky Home.  Growing up, Miller hung…See More
Aug 26
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Dave Minneman and a sense of justiceby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Dave Minneman doing research at Pack Memorial Library.  Photo by author.            “One of the biggest things I did as a kid, in order to escape my father,” Asheville resident Dave Minneman says of his 1960s and 70s rural Indiana childhood, “was…See More
Aug 25
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dellinger's Mill, Hawk, Mitchell County

Meet the 4th generation miller of a historic millby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Triptych of Dellinger Mill and Jack Dellinger in his mill, showing the hopper, the 1859 waterwheel, bags of cornmeal, and the National Historic Place plaque.  Photos and composition by Henry Neufeld.            I had written about…See More
Aug 21
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Aug 12
Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

FullSizeRender Lexie in the pillows

This is my little Lexie, a chihuahua mix who is tiny but so sweet. Here she is trying to sleep under my pillows. She is a burrower. Makes a great watch dog because she has a fierce bark.
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall posted an event

Tribute to Kathryn Stripling Byer at Jackson County Public Library, Sylva, NC

October 1, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
On October 1, Sunday afternoon, 2 PM, at Jackson County  Library in the Community Room, NCWN and NCWN-West will honor the late Poet Laureate, Kathryn S. Byer . Everyone is invited to come. We will share her poetry and talk about her achievements and her legacy for writers and poets in NC. If Kay touched your life in some way, come and pay tribute to her. We all miss her and this is a way to share our mourning for losing her and show our appreciation for what she did for us. See More
Aug 10
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"On Saturday, September 9, 10:30 a.m., Richard Kraweic will teach a class at Writers Circle. He will teach how to organize a poetry book for publication. I know I need to learn that lesson. How about you?"
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"We have a memoir class going on now until the first Wednesday in September. Wish you could join us in a class at Writers Circle around the Table."
Aug 10
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East Asheville history and sites

A meaningful tour of East Asheville PHOTO CAPTION: View of Beverly Hills suburb, from a painting by Gibson Catlett that had once hung at subdivision offices.  Courtesy Special Collection, Ramsey Library, UNC Asheville.            I was walking in the Beverly Hills neighborhood the other day and noticed a few…See More
Aug 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Gail Godwin’s latest crosses a mental boundary by Rob Neufeld Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m. “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Aug 3
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Poetrio reading at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

August 6, 2017 from 3pm to 4pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured Poetrio poet at Malaprop's Bookstore/Café on Sunday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Julia will be reading from her new book A Part of Me. Fred Chappell says of A Part of Me: "Duncan's every reader will be reminded of some person, place, or time important to recall in a quiet hour."See More
Jul 28
Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Pack Library, downtown Asheville

August 9, 2017 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Nancy Werking Poling will read from her new book, Before It Was Legal: a black-white marriage (1945-1987).The Winters' forty-two-year marriage spanned key historical periods of the 20th century and took them from Indiana to Mexico City. Freed from U.S. racism, Daniel felt "as Mexican as chile verde." Meanwhile, Anna, a reserved white woman who struggled with speaking Spanish, experienced no similar sense of liberation. Before It Was Legal is not a happily-ever-after story, but an honest…See More
Jul 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 4
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 1

Paul Reid of Tryon writes Winston Churchill: Defender of the Realm

Paul Reid of Tryon rounds out The Last Lion

by Rob Neufeld

 

            When Paul Reid got his advance from Little, Brown & Co. to write the third volume of William Manchester’s Winston Churchill biography, “The Last Lion,” he and his wife Barbara moved to Tryon from Florida, where he was an award-winning journalist for the “Palm Beach Post.”

            Reid knew the Carolina mountains.  As a lad from Winchester, Massachusetts and a student at Ithaca College in New York, he and his bluegrass band, the Promised Land String Band, had taken their sound to Boone, Linville, and Deep Gap.  

            Russ Barenberg, Reid’s guitar-playing hero, had sat in on their sessions in New York.  (Barenberg is the performer of “Ashokan Farewell,” the soundtrack theme in Ken Burns’ series, “The Civil War.”)

            Writing about a group of World War II veterans in the late 1990s, Reid met and established an affinity with William Manchester, the best-selling author and former journalist, who, as it turned out, was not able to complete his Churchill trilogy.  On Oct. 9, 2003, Manchester pulled out his suitcase of notes and told Reid, “I’d like you to finish the book.”

            Manchester planned to edit Reid’s work, but died of stomach cancer seven months later.  His notes were a puzzle of coded pages, without the section on sources included.  Reid worked for eight years, covering all the research territory over again, resulting in over 1,100 pages, and a volume titled, “Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965.”

            Reid presents his book at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 3 p.m. tomorrow.  Following is my interview with Paul Reid.

 

Q:  When you first met William Manchester, doing your story on the Marines, how did you bond?

 

A:  Pretty early on, he asked me about my father.  I said he went to the Naval Academy, and that I’d grown up reading military history.  I think he realized: this guy is a feature writer with a strong interest in history, not just on assignment.  When I visited (his area), doing other stories, or going to see my daughter at U. Mass, he’d invite me to stay over, and we’d chat…He wasn’t a lonely, old man, but he was an old man who lived alone.  So we just got to be friends.

 

Q:  He must have sensed an affinity that went beyond an interest in military history to one based on an approach to history.

 

A:  We were talking and I said, “Bill, you should get someone to finish the book.  Get a historian.”  He said, “I don’t want a historian.  If I wanted anyone, and I do not, I’d want a writer.”  I knew exactly what he meant.  I must have done 500 feature stories on all sorts of topics, and he asked if I could send up that month’s bundle of features.  He liked the writing.

 

Q:  You’ve won awards for your features.  What were some of those about?

 

A:  I did a story on the Pratt & Whitney engine for the F-22 Raptor—the biography of an engine….I did a story titled “Geraldo’s Violin.”  It was about a guy whose father had been a violin maker—this guy was now about 70—and his father had not finished a violin he’d started 65 year ago, and had put it in a box.  And now decades later, his son completes the violin and realizes he has a talent for it.

 

Q:  Isn’t that wonderful?  It sort of relates to you and William Manchester.

 

A:  Yes.  The unfinished story. 

 

Q:  How much of the new book did you create?

 

A:  The first 150 pages is a synthesis—there are about 100 of Bill’s pages in there.  From page 161 on, I don’t think Bill is in the book any more. 

 

Q:  That’s when you write about the German air strikes on London.  Let me quote a passage in which you follow Londoners coming out onto the streets from shelters.  “They rose to fires still burning, to stinking raw sewage seeping down gutters.  They emerged to unexploded bombs buried up to the fins in marl and mud, just waiting for the clumsy jolt that would start the fuse softly buzzing.”  I read somewhere that an old man gave you a tour of the haunted sites, and that fed your writing of that chapter.

 

A:  That walk with the old Londoner had a definite effect.  I could close my eyes and hear him.  I’d been to London many times. I had sources, books and maps.  But what a happy coincidence for me to have had this old guy walk me through where the planes came from at night.  I could imagine, I could re-listen to what he’d told me.

 

Q:  How has your newspaper writing experience helped your book writing?

 

A:  The value of journalism to this type of effort is critical.  When you’re making your living on deadlines, and you’ve got to get everything right—nobody wants to print a correction—and you want the reader to enjoy the story, and you have 36 hours to do it, and the next week, you’re on a whole new story—those are skills that are perfectly applicable to a project like this…(With) the demand upon yourself to keep the reader hooked, you don’t have the luxury of a one-page transition in a 15-inch feature story.  You have to move from Topic A to Topic B fluidly.  I told people I thought of the book as an 1,100 page feature story.

 

Q:  That’s the William Manchester tradition, and the Barbara Tuchman.

 

A:  Barbara Tuchman had a Bachelor’s from Radcliffe.  The divide between popular and scholarly history intrigues me.  If you look in the back of one of her books, it’s full of source notes…You can take “The Guns of August” to the beach.  That can’t be said about a lot of scholarly books.  I want a book that moves me, that makes me laugh and think, and doesn’t lecture me…I wanted my book to pass the campfire test as well as the scholarly test.

 

Q:  It’s a big subject, but you can you name one impact that Churchill had on history that readers should be especially aware of?

 

A:  He was full of contradictions and had a lot of faults, and that is made clear in the book.  That said, I believe that his fighting alone, in England, 1940-41, against Hitler (when others favored appeasement)…Because he believed that Nazism was a mortal threat to everything held dear in Western civilization since Plato.  I believe that he bought the time for the Russians to accidentally come in and for the Americans to come in to save Western civilization. 

 

Q:  One also has to be impressed by the effect that great oratory can have on history.

 

A:  My father, when I was a little kid, would put on recordings of Churchill on our RCA Victrola (while) he flipped pancakes and fried eggs for breakfast.  He’d walk around the kitchen in his Annapolis bathrobe, stabbing the air the air with the spatula in syncopation with Churchill’s words.  “Listen to Winston,” he commanded.  That's where it all began.

BOOK

The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Defender of the Realm, 1940-1965 by William Manchester and Paul Read (Little, Brown and Co. hardcover, Nov. 2012, 1,199 pages, $40).

 

AUTHOR EVENT

Paul Reid presents the third and final volume of “The Last Lion” at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville, 3 p.m., Jan. 5.  Call 254-6734.

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