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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 1
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness at City Lights Bookstore

July 28, 2017 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Linda Star Wolf will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, July 28th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her new book, Soul Whispering: The Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness.  Master Shamanic Breathwork Practitioner, Nita Gage co-wrote the book with Linda Star Wolf. The authors explore how the art of Soul Whispering can help each of us understand why we experience our lives the way we do and shift from healing our wounds to embracing the process of transformation. This is a powerful new…See More
May 27
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
May 23
Mirra updated an event
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Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 20
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6

NINA SIMONE: ABOUT THE BIO, AND ABOUT HER TRYON CHILDHOOD

See also the websites: The Eunice Waymon Birthplace; and the Eunice Waymon - Nina Simone Memorial Project.

 

New biography of Nina Simone puts her Tryon upbringing in larger light
by Rob Neufeld

“Dry Cleaning and Pressing—Called for and Delivered,” John Davan Waymon, an African American entrepreneur, advertised in a March 1929 issue of the “Tryon Daily Bulletin.” He had just moved to town from the Greenville-Spartanburg area, sensing that Tryon’s two grand hotels and four gas stations bode well for business.

When his rented home burned down a couple of years later, he and his wife, Kate, moved with their five children to a small home on East Livingston Street. A piano near the entrance burst with song, mostly sacred because Kate had become a minister in the St. Luke CME church. The first child born in that house, now preserved as a historic site, was Eunice Waymon, later known as Nina Simone, the iconic singer, pianist, and activist.

“When she was eight months old, my daughter hummed ‘Down by the Riverside’ and ‘Jesus Loves Me,’” Eunice’s mother recalled. At age two-and-a-half, Eunice played a hymn on the organ at church, and at age ten she was its regular organist. Her siblings adored her, reports Nadine Cohodas, author of the new biography, “Princess Noire: The Tumultuous Reign of Nina Simone.”

The rumblings that presaged the anger that Nina Simone would feel at the contrast between her favored life and the Jim Crow South shook her world on occasion. Her school principal, LeRoy Wells, dismayed by the separate-but-not-equal condition of the Tryon Colored School, hired men to burn it down. He was caught afterward, and went to prison. A new school was built, as the law dictated.

Eunice’s awareness of segregation was moderated by Tryon’s free interaction among the races, as long as certain lines weren’t crossed. Her oldest brother, John, worked on an integrated crew to build a bowling alley from which African Americans would be excluded.

Katherine Miller, a new resident of a tony Gillette Woods home, took notice of the daughter of her housekeeper, Kate Waymon, and paid for Eunice to take piano lessons with Muriel Harrington Mazzanovich, who lived across the street. At her first lesson, Eunice played Bach on a Weber grand.

After the first year, another transplant, Esther Moore, joined with Miller to create the “Eunice Waymon Fund.” “Sometime in 1944,” Cohodas tells the legendary story, “after Eunice had turned eleven, Miss Mazzy (as her teacher was called) arranged for her to give a recital, probably in the main room of the Lanier Library.” It was a whites-only event, but Eunice’s parents were invited.

When Eunice, at the piano, noticed her mom and dad being ushered from front seats to the back row, “Eunice spoke up. If anyone expected her to play, she told the audience, they better let her parents sit right where she could see them. The host, perhaps startled by this outburst, obliged.”

Earlier published story
Nina Simone’s talent was the product of genius and Tryon’s intentions

by Rob Neufeld

Fred Counts remembers walking down from Cemetery Side (also called Eastside) in Tryon with his friend, Eunice Waymon, in the early 1940s to buy sodas at Owen's Pharmacy. “I don’t think we serve the same God,” said Eunice, who later gained fame as Nina Simone, internationally lionized singer, pianist, and songwriter. “They (the white customers) can sit under the Casablanca fans,” she noted, “and we have to keep walking to drink our sodas.”

In a 1997 interview, Simone, an expatriate in France, said that she remained a rebel with a cause, the cause being “the direct equality of my people around the world.” A couple of years later, she returned to Tryon for her mother’s funeral. Suffering with the cancer that killed her in 2003, Simone barricaded herself within her security guards.

The guards stopped Counts on his way to visit Simone, but she admitted him. He advised her to have no regrets about the past. “You had the talent to go to the top, and the character to stay there for more than forty years,” he said. “We who fought racism got more relief from it than those who hid away.”

Counts was, among other things, a celebrated Tryon Allstars shortstop who, because of segregation, had gotten no shot at the major leagues. Today, he serves as an inspiring presenter of programs about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and African-American poets.

The sharpness of Simone’s convictions may be due to the contrast of hurtful times and good times that she experienced. The view from Simone’s hilltop childhood home (presently undergoing historic preservation) reveals a community nestling within view. The Waymon’s 22-by-26 foot house, presided over by two admired parents, had resonated with joyful organ music.

At age three, Eunice, sixth child of eight, proved to be a piano prodigy; and at age six, performed hymns in the St. Luke CME Church, where her mother was minister. At a church on Peake Street, Simone discovered African rhythms. In her autobiography, “I Put a Spell on You,” she confided, “I took to going to the Holiness services every week just to get into that beat.”

Tryon’s colony of artists and reformers latched onto Eunice with love. Tom Moore remembers how his mother, Esther Moore, Eunice’s mother’s friend and employer, paid for Eunice’s piano lessons. Every day for six years, the girl walked two miles to her tutor, Mrs. Mazzanovich, to embrace classical composers and classic composure.

“Tryon’s white people wanted to make her (Nina) into the Marian Anderson of concert pianists,” says Mike McCue, author of “Tryon Artists 1892-1942.”

At age eleven, Eunice gave a concert at Lanier Library and underwent the shame of seeing her parents moved from the front row to the back. It stung her bad.

“The racial climate of Tryon was more complex than I had thought,” says acclaimed biographer Nadine Cohodas, who’s working on a book on Simone. For Simone, circumscribed by music, family, and Tryon’s patronage, the specter of Jim Crow was a shock.

While contracting as a caterer in the home of Esther Moore in Tryon, Mary Kate Waymon served as a minister in the St. Luke C.M.E. Church in Eastside, a nearby African-American neighborhood. She had two lives: one rooted in tradition; the other adapted to the wealthy, progressive, white community that had colonized Tryon in the late nineteenth century.

Moore treated Waymon with dignity and, recognizing the prodigal talent of Waymon’s daughter, Eunice, paid for her to take piano lessons with another cultural import, Muriel Mazzanovich, English wife of a Croatian-Italian painter. From this connection emerged Nina Simone, Eunice’s stage name when she started pursuing musical fame up north several years later.

Mary Kate Waymon was good friends with Della Hayden Davenport Jackson, a teacher and civic leader from Stony Knoll, five miles from Tryon. Jackson attended Waymon’s church.

Della had been the first member of her family, in 1923, to attend high school, traveling to Allen School in Asheville. She later attended and graduated from N.C. Central College in Durham, returned home to teach, and, in 1937, established the Stony Knoll Community Library, still a bulwark of African-American heritage.

Della’s daughter, Evelyn Petty, who now runs the library, recalls her mother’s activism as well as the effects of the rich white community on the rural population. “My aunt,” says Petty, “worked in Tryon for Carter Brown,” Pine Crest Inn proprietor and the horseman who introduced foxhunting to the area. “She stayed on the premises most of the time. When she came home, she brought presents and told us how to do things properly.”

With the special relationship between white and black residents, Tryon took a step ahead of other communities in the South by incorporating segregated schools into a consolidated system as early as the 1930s. The African-American schools received support; still, the racial divide cut deep.

Mamie Thompson Gumbs, Curator of the MaimyEtta Black Historical Society and Museum in Forest City, played basketball with Eunice Waymon in the early 1940s—on outside courts even in snow, for they had no access to indoor ones. Eunice never spoke of the patronage she was getting from Mrs. Moore and others. “Everything was like a secret,” Gumbs says. No one wanted to endanger white folks who were helping.

Theresa Price Bennings, Forest City native, studied Bible under Eunice’s mother, Mary Kate, and led a parallel life to Eunice. When she was six, a white stranger insulted Bennings for drinking from a fountain in a park her father was cleaning. It hurt bad. Like Eunice, Bennings went to New York to make a living when she reached maturity; and like her, she had spunk. Wanting to get beyond her postal clerk job and sweltering Bronx walk-up, Benning went to see the mayor, Robert Wagner.

“Your Honor,” Bennings said, “I come from North Carolina and believe I can be an asset to your city.” Wagner found her an apartment in grassy Throgs Neck; and secured her a scholarship to Baruch College.

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