Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Woodsmen Day

Woodsmen Day ( Poem)Sport using handsaws With a toothed edge blade One or two handed sawingOn a woodsmen fair dayTraditional log rolling Is a lumberjacks technique Style used in river drivingThe illustration is uniqueSpringboard tree is branchless With live action you can’t beat Platform board is dangerousA risk if you competeBlock ax chopping Is a loggers sport indeed Hard on your back swingingBe careful of your feetWoodsmen day activities Is part of the fair you see I bring it all to my…See More
5 hours ago
Rob Neufeld commented on Deborah Worley-Holman's photo
Thumbnail

Peter McClay "M.C." Worley

"Great photo, Deborah!  Have you got some stories and details?"
Monday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Sunday
Christine Lajewski posted a blog post

Discussing JHATOR at UCC in Norwell, MA

JHATOR was chosen as the summer read for the book club at the United Church of Christ in Norwell, MA.  Today, the Rev. Deborah Spratley hosted an author's brunch and discussion of the book with me and members of both the book club and writer's group at the church.One of the first things I learned from the group members, who are approaching the book from a Christian POV, is that starting the book with Anat, the vulture, was unsettling for most of them.  Of course, that is the point of Chapter…See More
Sunday
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Saturday
Jerald Pope posted an event
Thumbnail

The Backyard as Metaphor: Poems on Cattle, Gardening & Goats: a Poetry Reading and Discussion with Tina Barr at Monte Vista Hotel

August 21, 2014 from 5:45pm to 7pm
The Black Mountain Author’s Guild will present nationally known poet, Tina Barr, this Third Thursday at 6pm at the Monte Vista Hotel. Ms. Barr will read a twenty minute series of poems set in Black Mountain, and will follow the reading with a discussion of her process for generating ideas in poems, with lots of audience interaction.  She will bring in a series of drafts demonstrating her revision process, from rough draft to published poem, and talk about fictionalizing elements so they move…See More
Aug 12
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Wishing Witch

Wishing WitchMy Halloween screenplay is funny as can be It’s funny how witchcraft is what we need to seeBrewing up trouble with all your classmates The teacher will get angry, make no mistakeCrazy riddles from a child can be so scary Being her classmate leaves you feeling waryYou may start a princess and end as a boar As her riddles will leave you in an uproarWill you return to normal after all this nonsense Is the question that has everyone in suspenseYou may not have believed in the…See More
Aug 11
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Timm Muth to Present His Fantasy Novel at City Lights Bookstore

August 30, 2014 from 3pm to 4:30pm
Jackson County resident, Timm Muth will read from and sign his new fantasy novel on Saturday, August 30th at 3 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore.  Disciple of the Flames chronicles the story of Darn, whose life as a herder’s son was hard, dirty and not in the least adventurous. Fate intervenes when on a journey with his father, a stranger saves Darn from a near fatal rousting by local bullies, eventually leading to Darn’s induction into a powerful religious and military order: The Disciple of…See More
Aug 9
Malaprop's Bookstore Cafe posted events
Aug 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted blog posts
Aug 7
Sharon Gruber posted an event
Thumbnail

Social Function of Narrative in Appalachian Society with Charlotte Ross at Ferguson Auditorium - A-B Tech Campus

August 9, 2014 from 2pm to 3:30pm
Presented by the Asheville History Center - Smith McDowell House in conjunction with the exhibition Hillbilly Land:  Myth and Reality of Appalachian Culture currently on view at the Smith McDowell House. Made possible through a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council.See More
Aug 6
Caralyn Davis posted a blog post

New Essay Published at Dr. TJ Eckleburg Review

My new essay "A Damn Fine Female Body Part" is live at the Doctor TJ Eckleburg Review. It is NSFW, covering the topics of curse words, sexual objectification, and the actor Norman Reedus of The Walking Dead, all in under 2,000 words! See More
Aug 5
Deborah Worley-Holman posted a photo

Peter McClay "M.C." Worley

My grandfatherm M.C. Worley 1894-1983 who was a musician and instrument maker.
Aug 5
Dave Turner posted a blog post
Aug 4
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Book discussions in WNC, August 2014

WNC BOOK DISCUSSION CALENDAR, AUGUST 2014Friday, August 1BOOK CLUB: The Best? Books book club holds a book discussion at the College Walk Retirement Center, 100 N. College Row, Brevard, 10:30 a.m. Call 884-3151, ext. 226.Saturday, August 2 Sunday, August 3ROYAL BOOK CLUB: The ROYAL Book Club meets to discuss “Darius and Twig” by…See More
Aug 3
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Read All About It

READ ALL ABOUT ITStories all of 100 years old Bribery And Blackmail They have to be retoldDefinitions of words have surely changed as Kilts And Reefers are now explained.Two Kinds Of Success stories That Work Both Ways Stealing From Citiesand the Faithful Toby wayNo Poison In The Wallpaper is History Rewritten With A Humble Helperand Powerful CompetitionLike a Scene In A Play The Counterpane Got Smutty He Raised The Bid todaywas a story so funnyStriking A Light was crazy amazing but Obeying The…See More
Aug 3

Memories of old Biltmore Village

Part 1 of 3

by Rob Neufeld

See Part 2, about boys in 1940s

 

            “I’ve generally spent most of my life between the railroad tracks in Biltmore and the Royal Steakhouse in Fletcher,” real estate developer and former Tri-Co Service Station owner Winston Pulliam remarked to Mike Blanton on Blanton’s radio show (“Financially Speaking”).  “And I want to emphasize how blessed I have been.”

            During the Great Depression, when he was a boy, Pulliam lived on his grandparents’ 20-acre farm on Fairview Road, working the land.

            “I peeled many a peach and pitted many cherries” he told me in a recent interview.

            “We had caves on the back of our property,” he recalled. “and hoboes would stay in those caves, coming off the railroad.  They had lard buckets to make coffee in, and I’d take them food over there when I was eight or nine years old.
            His father advised him to take “a bag of something” to neighbors and say, “The lady next door just gave me this (for the hoboes).  What can you give me?”

            After Saturday chores, Pulliam, nicknamed “Pullie,” often went to hang out with his friends—Charles Thomas “Tommy” Koontz, Tommy Arakas, and others in the village, even though Oakley boys were discouraged from crossing into that territory.

            But boys’ friendships, during the Depression and World War II, crossed boundaries.  Tommy’s family was “as poor as Job’s church mouse,” Tommy said in the recollection session with Pulliam. 

            His father, Ralph Koontz, “was a sick man when he was young, He had TB and spent time at the sanitarium in Swannanoa.” He did various jobs. 

            “According to my mother,” Tommy said, “we moved every time the rent came due.”

            Koontz’s first memory of Biltmore Village was when “Mama” Gray, the landlord of the 7 All Souls Crescent upstairs apartment in which the Koontzes resided, came around yelling out, “Yoo-hoo, do you have anything for me today?”

            Another early memory was of the goat man coming into the village with his goat and wagon for family photo ops.  Tommy’s mother, Elizabeth Vance Koontz, found the money for one such occasion in 1938.

            The boys were friends with Harold and Ruel Austin, sons of Biltmore Estate’s chief ranger; and had free access to the estate.  “I slept probably 50 times in the Biltmore House,” Pulliam recalled.

            Harold and Ruel “had a pet deer they got as a baby, and bottle fed him,” Pulliam recalled.  “His name was Jim…I’m the only person that tried to ride Jim (unsuccessfully).

            “Two weeks ago, I called Ruel and asked him, ‘How did Jim die?”  He said, ‘They gave him to Laurence Brown, the sheriff, to put up on his farm.  And Jim wandered into some fellow’s back yard, and this man thought he was a wild deer, and shot him.”

            “It was the worst of times and the best of times,” Koontz recited, reflecting on the era that featured poverty and community, an empty belly and a fire in the belly, lightness of heart and darkness of circumstance.

            “We had God in our lives,” Pulliam said.

            Darkness was what Tommy had experienced off and on for a year when he was six, staying in his bedroom with the windows curtained.

            “I failed my first year of school at the Newton Academy up on Biltmore Ave.,” he said, “because I was absent about every other week because  I had every other childhood disease that came along—measles, the mumps, chicken pox, everything but scarlet fever.  I remember that public nurse coming and tacking that yellow sign up on the door: Quarantine.  People couldn’t come to see you.  You couldn’t go out.  You were isolated.”

            This was especially hard in a neighborhood in which there was so much social activity—people out on porches, children crossing yards under the care of dozens of surrogate parents, people doing business.

            “I knew the names of everybody who lived from West Chapel Road to Biltmore,” Koontz said.

            Missing school was tough, too.  It was not only an extension of the social scene, it was a field of dreams.  Koontz would later serve in his life as the long-time principal of T.C. Roberson High School.  This past January, the new Intermediate School on Overlook Rd. was named after him.

            “I was in the sixth grade with Dewey Callaway,” Pulliam related, “and the teacher asked us, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up.  Dewey put down, ‘I want to own the Biltmore Shoe Shop’ (owned by L.A. Spake, who’d employ Dewey).  He stayed 28 years in the Army, came back home, and bought that shoe shop.”

            Many kids went to work at an early age, often in jobs that served the community.

            “I was hopping curb at the Hot Shot (Café) when I was 12,” Pulliam recalled.  “They had the hot dogs, hamburgers, roast beef, roast pork, cheeseburgers, barbecue, combination, ham, spam, ram, lamb, bull, beef, and bear,” he chanted.

            Pullie’s dream as a kid was to own a service station; and he accomplished that, first an Esso on Coxe Ave., then the Tri-Co on Brook St. in Biltmore Village.

            Tri-Co became the gathering place in the post-World War II years, as Pulliam worked from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., and entertained as well as served customers.  “We had printed on our charge tickets,” he told Blanton, “We fix everything but broken hearts, and we work on them.”

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Richard Koontz, age 4, and Tommy Koontz, age 6, pose in the goat man’s wagon in Biltmore Village, 1938.  Photo courtesy Tommy Koontz.

Views: 158

Reply to This

© 2014   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service