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East Asheville history and sites

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Feb 27.

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

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City Lights Bookstore posted events
Aug 12
Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

FullSizeRender Lexie in the pillows

This is my little Lexie, a chihuahua mix who is tiny but so sweet. Here she is trying to sleep under my pillows. She is a burrower. Makes a great watch dog because she has a fierce bark.
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall posted an event

Tribute to Kathryn Stripling Byer at Jackson County Public Library, Sylva, NC

October 1, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
On October 1, Sunday afternoon, 2 PM, at Jackson County  Library in the Community Room, NCWN and NCWN-West will honor the late Poet Laureate, Kathryn S. Byer . Everyone is invited to come. We will share her poetry and talk about her achievements and her legacy for writers and poets in NC. If Kay touched your life in some way, come and pay tribute to her. We all miss her and this is a way to share our mourning for losing her and show our appreciation for what she did for us. See More
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"On Saturday, September 9, 10:30 a.m., Richard Kraweic will teach a class at Writers Circle. He will teach how to organize a poetry book for publication. I know I need to learn that lesson. How about you?"
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"We have a memoir class going on now until the first Wednesday in September. Wish you could join us in a class at Writers Circle around the Table."
Aug 10
Rob Neufeld's discussion was featured

East Asheville history and sites

A meaningful tour of East Asheville PHOTO CAPTION: View of Beverly Hills suburb, from a painting by Gibson Catlett that had once hung at subdivision offices.  Courtesy Special Collection, Ramsey Library, UNC Asheville.            I was walking in the Beverly Hills neighborhood the other day and noticed a few…See More
Aug 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Gail Godwin’s latest crosses a mental boundary by Rob Neufeld Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m. “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Aug 3
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Poetrio reading at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

August 6, 2017 from 3pm to 4pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured Poetrio poet at Malaprop's Bookstore/Café on Sunday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Julia will be reading from her new book A Part of Me. Fred Chappell says of A Part of Me: "Duncan's every reader will be reminded of some person, place, or time important to recall in a quiet hour."See More
Jul 28
Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Pack Library, downtown Asheville

August 9, 2017 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Nancy Werking Poling will read from her new book, Before It Was Legal: a black-white marriage (1945-1987).The Winters' forty-two-year marriage spanned key historical periods of the 20th century and took them from Indiana to Mexico City. Freed from U.S. racism, Daniel felt "as Mexican as chile verde." Meanwhile, Anna, a reserved white woman who struggled with speaking Spanish, experienced no similar sense of liberation. Before It Was Legal is not a happily-ever-after story, but an honest…See More
Jul 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 4
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 1
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 29
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3

A walk through nature with the Ellisons

by Rob Neufeld

AUTHOR EVENTS

George Ellison talks about his new book, “Literary Excursions in the Southern Highlands: Essays on Natural History,” at Macon County Public Library, 149 Siler Farm Road

Franklin, 7 p.m., Dec. 7 (828-524-3600); and at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville, 3 p.m., Mar. 12, 2017 (828-254-6734).

 

            When you read a book by George Ellison, you get, in his nature writing about our region, six voices blending into a unique style.

            First, there’s his informal voice, as when, in his new book, “Literary Excursions in the Southern Highlands: Essays on Natural History” (History Press), he talks about hornblende and admits to cribbing a Geology 101 textbook and consulting experts “who are in no way responsible for my conclusions.”

            He’s always there, in between his gifts of wisdom, like a folksy teacher.

            Then there’s the mystical Ellison.  His task in this mode is to advocate for divinity in an everyday way.  “At night, I don’t count sheep,” he tells us in the first chapter, “Geography of Place: Inner and Outer Landscapes.”   “I name the mountain ranges and rivers from east to west.” 

            In his chapter, “Inward Eyes,” he asks, “How do we go about making sure we continue seeing the world about us with fresh eyes?”

 

Observation packets

 

            Ellison titles his new book “Literary Excursions” not because he’s providing author tours, but because he treats other authors’ observations about nature as if they were, along with wildlife, part of a spread.

            William Bartram, in his 1791 book, “Travels in North Carolina and South Carolina,” Ellison reveals, loved the magnolia blossom, which, Bartram precisely described, “fits in the center of a radius of very large leaves, which...form an expansive umbrella superbly crowned or crested with the fragrant flower, representing a white plume.”

            Ellison then turns to James Costa, director of the Highlands Botanical Station, who informs us that the flower dates back to pre-bee times, when beetles had been the most sought pollinators.

            Finally, Ellison ends with a quip, quoting biologist J.B.S. Haldane, who, when asked what nature told him about God, replied that “the Creator apparently had an inordinate fondness for beetles.”

            When Ellison serves as the chief explainer, seeking conciseness and clarity, he often throws in a punchy line, such as: “If you happen to be a spider, the female dirt dauber is your worst nightmare.”   

            But it’s not all wit and charm.  At certain times, Ellison must be the scientist.

            For example, writing about the northern harrier in his chapter, “The Gray Ghost,” Ellison advises, “The diagnostic feature to look for is the white rump.  Less apparent are the facial disks.”

            He goes on a while longer about male and female coloring and size, and about nesting and roosting habits.  And then, extending the description to courtship and foraging behaviors, he gives poetry some space.

            First he borrows from “The Birds of America,” which portrays the male harrier “sweeping in great semicircles, gradually lessening in diameter,” at which point “he stops suddenly in the top of a swoop, closes his wings, drops, turns head over tail, drops again, turns over and swings upward from the last somersault, just clear of the ground on another ecstatic performance.”

            “What sort of female of any kind could resist that sort of display?” Ellison muses.  Then he does his own visually enhanced job by picturing the bird in foraging mode, “spreading the feathers in their wingtips, creating ‘slots’ that...allow low-speed maneuvers...hovering several feet above the ground, face always pointed downward.”

            Poetry, for Ellison, is knowing the world.  And that includes being able to distinguish between variations of the same species, a discipline that guidebooks often don’t do very well.

 

Poetry

 

            Ellison’s sixth voice is poetry.  His 2012 book of poems, “Permanent Camp,” issues such lines as: “Certain images rivet attention/ and lodge in memory banks:/ a timber rattler coiled beside a trail/ a kestrel hovering on blurred wings/ a hellbender in gin-cleared mountain water...”

            In “Literary Excursions,” he reins that lyrical voice in because, you get the feeling, he has a job to do, like a farmer who has to actually tend to his crops before taking a break and breaking out.

            Ellison’s job-like job is, first, to be precise.  Then, he can pause and be amiable. 

Don’t take for granted his favorite songbird, the redbird, he tells us.  “From time to time, we have to remind ourselves to pay attention to the commonplace.”

            The “Redbird” chapter is one of my favorites in that it builds a personality and a legend within the framework of natural history.

            “Elizabeth and I,” Ellison says about walks with his wife, “have observed that they (the northern cardinals) are almost always the first bird to sing in the morning during the breeding season and that during the winter months they are almost they are almost the last bird to visit our feeders before dark.”

            Ellison surmises, “They like to be in charge of the other songbirds in their area, so they wake them up in the morning and see them to bed at night...the male perhaps carries things a tad too far when he engages in lengthy battles with his own reflection.”

            There is a seventh voice, in a manner of speaking, in Ellison’s book, and that is Elizabeth’s brilliant watercolor artwork.  The photo-quality pages of their volume are rife with illustrations, all apt.

            For instance, when George set about showcasing witch hobble, he wrote Dan Pittillo, retired professor of biology and founding editor of “Chinquapin,” to have him look at “Elizabeth’s rendering of what I think of as a sort of Stained Glass Window effect.”  The artwork is in the book, as are Pitillo’s and his colleagues’ musings about the color phenomenon. 

            Ellison is a nature journalist, and he has created a community of naturalist-songbirds, in a sense.

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