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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

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Latest Activity

Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Black Mountain Library

June 15, 2019 from 3pm to 4pm
Can women rescue the planet from ecological disaster?Nancy Werking Poling will launch her new novel, WHILE EARTH STILL SPEAKS, set in WNC. She'll tell the stories behind the story: How did Mary (more crone than virgin) get into the narrative? And Mary Surratt, a co-conspirator of John Wilkes Booth?See More
Jun 10
Caroline McIntyre posted events
Apr 29
Rob Neufeld updated their profile
Apr 13
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Flat Rock history via a road

Travelling back in time on a Flat Rock roadby Rob Neufeld             If you walk the one mile length of North Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, you step nearly 200 years into the past.            At the east end, the 21st century reigns.  Fronting six-lane Spartanburg Highway, a super-Ingles sits above a bog; and a CVS store faces an Octopus Garden smoke shop, a chiropractor, a cell phone provider, and a six-lane avenue to I-26 a mile away .            Neither Ingles nor CVS carries the big…See More
Apr 8
George Ellison left a comment for Renea Winchester
"luv ya Renea ... Kephart bio finally done after 40 years ... free at last ... free at last... great god almighty ... free a last!"
Apr 5
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Connie Regan-Blake Storytelling at Hendersonville Public Library at Henderson County Public Library - Main Branch

June 13, 2019 from 6pm to 7pm
Join Connie Regan-Blake for a family oriented evening of stories at the Hendersonville Library.See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Please join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” Here are the tellers for our April 6th “Slice of Life” performance.  Christine Phillips Westfeldt, Kyra Freeman, Steve Tate, Alberta Hipps and more! The event is hosted by the …See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive,…See More
Apr 1
Rap Monster posted a blog post

Stealth Hazy - 'Gun Clap'

Stealth Hazy - Gun ClapI got 80 rounds with a beam on it riding dirty I'm smoking chronic top off hear that system pound 808 thats subsonicI double down quadruple upstraight droppin with no cutwilt chamberlain on the reboundand you a fan just starstruckI…See More
Mar 26
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Mar 2
Sue Diehl shared their event on Facebook
Feb 8
Sue Diehl posted an event
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Montreat College Friends of the Library Celebrate National Library Week at Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College, Montreat, NC

April 9, 2019 from 3pm to 5pm
Patti Callahan, author of the recent novel Becoming Mrs. Lewis, and Don W. King author of Out of My Bone: the Letters of Joy Davidman, A Naked Tree: Love Sonnets to C. S. Lewis, and Yet One More Spring: a Critical Study of Joy Davidman, will co-present on their works about Joy and her husband C.S. Lewis.  The event is free and open to the public on April 9, 2019 in Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College.Reception and Book signing to followSee More
Feb 8
William Roy Pipes posted a discussion

TWO NEW APPALACHIAN NOVELS

I have, just released two Appalachian Novels.OUT OF THE SHADOWS, begins deep in the Appalachian Mountains of in WNC. It is partly a true story about a young man who ran away from home at the age of fifteen. He meets another runaway, and they fall in love.A journey where he faced adversaries, but also success as he walked, hitchhiked, and made his way across the country.GONE LIKE A CANDLE IN THE WIND, is a story of three young people growing up in a farming community in the Appalachian…See More
Jan 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Main Show

The Main Show: a story-poem stage presentation(part of  Living Poem)See video of Act 1, Scene 1: The SettingPrologue Narrator:   Don’t listen, children, and do not hear.(A monster is coming and there’s no escapeWithin this story, and no good way to tell it, Except to gaze at the horror as at a flower,A disaster streaming off extremes it breedsEverywhere and in our…See More
Jan 26
Don Talley posted a discussion

Hollywood Pictures Inc in Fairview

In the 1920's it seemed the whole country was caught up in excitement about films and Hollywood.    Asheville and Western North Carolina were well aware of the hoopla of Hollywood.   In fact, Hollywood (or at least filmmaking) was already beginning to come to Western NC.I recently stumble across an article from the Jun 6 1926 issue of The Asheville Citizen Times which mentions that Hollywood Pictures Inc, was planning to film just south of Asheville, near Fairview.  But....was this really…See More
Jan 23

Interviews with former slaves in Asheville strike the heart

by Rob Neufeld

 

            Every day we see and feel the beauty of the world and of humanity.  But history sometimes shows us how wrong things can go, and we wonder why we are vulnerable to such aberrations.

            One of the most powerfully distressing examples of human cruelty and suffering comes from the testimony of M.L. Bost, an African American former slave who moved to Asheville from Newton, and spoke with Marjorie Jones of the Federal Writers’ Project in 1937, when he was 87.

 

Cry

 

            M.L.’s last name derives from his “Massa,” Jonah Bost, who owned two plantations and a hotel in Newton, NC. 

            The Bost “Missus” was “a good woman,” W.L. said.  “There was never an overseer” on the plantations; the “oldest colored man” looked after the other slaves.  And “she never allowed the Massa to buy or sell any slaves.”

            Bost’s slaves had come down through at least two generations.

            On occasion, speculators—slave merchants—would come through town and stay at Bost’s place.  M.L. witnessed what ensued when he was a boy.

            “They always come ‘long on the last of December,” he recalled, “so that the n—s would be ready for sale on the first day of January.  Many the time I see four or five of them chained together.

            “They never had enough clothes on to keep a cat warm.  The women never wore anything but a thin dress and a petticoat and one underwear.  I’ve seen the ice balls hangin’ on to the bottom of their dresses as they ran along, jes like sheep in a pasture ‘fore they are sheared.  They never wore any shoes.”

            To keep warm, the slaves were made to run around by mounted overseers.   “Lord miss, them slaves look jes like droves of turkeys runnin’ along in front of them horses,” W.L. said.

            When the speculators stayed in the hotel, the slaves slated for sale stayed outside in a pen, like hogs.  “All through the night I could hear them mournin’ and prayin’,” W.L. recollected.  “I didn’t know the Lord would let people live who were so cruel.”

 

Paddyrollers

 

            There was no escaping slavery.  Paddyrollers—patrollers searching for fugitive slaves—would capture any person of color out and about without a pass from his or her master.  They then would strip that person and lash him or her with a bull whip.

            M.L. talked about seeing one young man slashed with a whip, salted, and then whipped again, until he died.

            M.L.’s mother, though grateful not to be separated from spouse and children, as was the case with the slaves on the market, prayed and sang for freedom. 

            The Bost slaves would sneak off to have church services in the woods back of the barn.  They sang: “As I went down in the valley to pray/ Studyin’ about that good ole way/ Who shall wear that starry crown/ Good Lord show me the way.”

            Two years before the end of the war, another Newton plantation owner, “ole man Hall,” freed his slaves and gave them money to buy their own land. 

            When the war ended, the Bost family went to work for Hall’s nephew, Solomon Hall.  A few years later, M.L. found his way with his wife to Asheville, and eventually built a house on Curve St. (off present-day Martin Luther King Jr. Drive).

            The post-war years had been as frightening to African Americans in the plantation South as the slave years had been, according to W.L. and other former slaves interviewed by Marjorie Jones.

 

Fear, the sequel

 

            When Union soldiers came into Selma, Ala., Lizzie Williams, a petted slave to the wife of “Marse Jim Moore,” recalled, they looted and set fire to buildings.  She knew of one man, “Marse Hyde,” who burned up inside his home when the soldiers torched it.

            After the surrender, Williams said, “all the n—s (were) just lost.  Nowhere to go, nothin’ to do, unless they stay with the massa.  Nobody had anything but ‘federate money, and it no good.”

            White men, dispossessed and angry, went around tormenting and killing black men, Williams recounted.  They went to kill her father, but he managed to persuade one of the vigilantes that he planned on staying on his massa’s plantation and helping him.

            Lizzie’s pappy had had such confrontations before emancipation.  Once, he evaded paddyrollers when he didn’t have a pass on him by jumping into a ditch and making grunting sounds like a hog.

            In the post-war climate, the Ku Klux Klan struck fear into black people.  Unlike paddyrollers, they moved around late at night, abducting victims.

            They were known for their white hoods and robes; and, on occasion, horns they put over the caps of their hoods. 

            “They had another thing they called the ‘Donkey Devil,’” M.L. Bost related.  “They take the skin of a donkey and get inside of it and run after the poor Negroes...After the war was over, we were afraid to move.”

 

Work legacy

 

            Sarah Gudger, a former slave of Joe Gudger in Oteen, and then of the Hemphills near Old Fort, told Marjorie Jones about the time that a new slave woman joined the Hemphill household just before the end of the war.

            “Some of these days yo’all gwine be free,” the woman said, jes’ like the white folks.”  Sarah and the others laughed.  “No, we jes’ slaves,” Sarah responded.  “We allus have to work and never be free.”

            Gudger recalled working from 4 a.m. to 10 p.m. in all weather for the Hemphills.  “I never knowed what it was to rest,” Gudger said.  “Lawdy, honey, I’s took a thousand lashin’s in my day.” 

            Gudger’s worst moment was when she was not allowed to come in from the field after her mother had died and before she was put in the ground.

Saved a life

            Fannie Moore, interviewed by Jones at her home at 151 Valley St. in 1937, recalled how hard her mother had worked.

            “My mammy, she worked in the field all day, and pieced and quilted all night.  Why, sometimes I never got to bed.  Had to hold the light for her to see by.”

            Fannie’s father was a blacksmith, but when the war came, he was escort and cook for the master’s sons, Andrew and Tom Moore of Moore, SC.

            Andrew was killed, shot while raising the Confederate flag for his regiment.  Fannie’s father took him home, and then went back to stay with Marse Tom.

            Tom was shot, too, but was protected from a fatal injury by a Bible in his breast pocket.  “Pappy, he bring Marse Tom home,” Fannie related, “and take care of him till he well.  Marse Tom gave pappy a horse and wagon cause he said he save his life.”

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS

 

All photos and slave narratives from Library of Congress Manuscript Division (visit memory.loc.gov/ammem/snhtml).  The transcribed narrative of M.L. Bost enters his name as W.L. Bost, but I have discovered through local research that he was Martin Luther Bost.  A hand-written "M" must have been misread as a "W."

 

M.L. Bost

 

Sarah Gudger, age 121, at Dalton St. home, Asheville

 

Fannie Moore

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