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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Seven new books, Oct. 2014, leading with McCrumb's latest

Sharyn McCrumb’s new book tour; and other productionsby Rob Neufeld Nora Bonesteel’s Christmas Past by Sharyn McCrumb (Abingdon Press hardcover, Oct. 7, 2014, 160 pages, $18.99)            I didn’t receive a review copy, but I can say McCrumb is always a delight and a deliverance.  McCrumb’s new holiday…See More
yesterday
Spellbound posted events
Oct 15
Jerald Pope posted an event

Black Mountain Authors Get Hungry at Monte Visa Hotel

October 16, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
The Third Thursday reading this month will feature stories and poems about food. As you might imagine, a whole hungry cadre of writers stepped up to the plate to read. The feast will take place at the Monte Vista Hotel this Thursday, which also just happens to be Fried Chicken day at the Hotel. Yum! Here’s what’s on the menu: Jeff Hutchins moved to Black Mountain in 2008. In his prior life, Jeff helped develop the technology of closed captioning, which is used to make television programming…See More
Oct 15
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Cherokee pottery survey Oct 17

Cherokee Museum Presents Cherokee Pottery on International Archaeology Dayfrom press release            The Museum of the Cherokee Indian will present “Cherokee Pottery: Three Thousand Years of Cherokee Science and Art” on Friday October 17 at 2 pm.  This talk is part of International Archaeology Day, sponsored by the Archaeological Institute of America.  It is open to the public free of charge, and is suitable for all ages.             “We are glad to be participating in International…See More
Oct 14
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Conversation with George Ella Lyon

Getting deep with east Kentucky author George Ella Lyonby Rob Neufeld             George Ella Lyon is a prolific writer of poetry, fiction, and plays for all ages; and has emerged from her east Kentucky upbringing with many things to tell the world about Appalachian virtues, including neighborliness, woodland spirit,…See More
Oct 14
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Oct 14
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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A Look at Climate Change and Mass Extinction at City Lights Bookstore

October 17, 2014 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Charles Dayton and Sara Evans will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, October 17th at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion on climate change and mass extinction. Evans will review The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert, a book about the increase in mass extinctions and the impending ecological collapse caused by man’s disharmony with the natural world. Dayton will speak and present slides about the impact of climate change on the ocean’s ecology, which is also discussed in The Sixth…See More
Oct 11
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Book discussions in WNC, October 2014

WNC BOOK DISCUSSION CALENDAR, OCTOBER 2014Wednesday, October 1AUTISM BOOK CLUB: The Autism Book Club discusses “Mozart and the Whale” by Jerry and Mary Newport at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville, 1 p.m. Call 254-6734.MALAPROP’S BOOKCLUB: The Malaprop’s Bookclub, hosted by Jay Jacoby, discusses “Winesburg,…See More
Oct 8
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 6
James D. Loy posted a blog post

"Loy's Loonies," a new series of zany books

Hi folks:     I am pleased to announce the publication of the second book in my series "Loy's Loonies."  This one is entitled Uncle Moe and the Martha's Vineyard Frackers and here's the cover blurb.     Moe Thibault is a lovable octogenarian who sometimes thinks he’s Jacques Clouseau and who’s convinced he once had an identical twin. While living out his widower’s retirement in upstate New York, Moe is sent an obituary from Martha’s Vineyard with a photo of his apparent Doppelganger, a man…See More
Oct 2
Lockie Hunter posted an event
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Juniper Bends and Topside Press present: Where We're Going We Don't Need Roads at The Crow & Quill

October 8, 2014 from 8pm to 10pm
This fall the best new transgender fiction is going on a road trip! Topside Press authors Casey Plett (author of A Safe Girl To Love) and Sybil Lamb (author of I’ve Got A Time Bomb) will be crisscrossing Canada and the United-States. Asheville is hosting these Topside authors with the help of Juniper Bends Reading Series, and The Crow & Quill. Join us on Wednesday, October 8th at 8 pm to hear the work of these two …See More
Sep 29
Randolph Wilson replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Place-names salute us in a revised gazetteer
"I was born on Bill's Creek...the son of Roland and Jeanette Frady Wilson. I spent my first 18 years on the old Frady farm on Bill's Creek. We lived with my Grandfather and Grandmother....Dewey Frady and Diza Hall Frady. I remember…"
Sep 29
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Sep 27
Sue Diehl posted an event

Rose Senehi with Montreat College Friends of the Library at Bell Library at Montreat College

November 2, 2014 from 3pm to 5pm
Rose Senehi, author of Dancing on Rocks, will discuss her most recent novel in the Blue Ridge Mountain series on Sunday afternoon, November 2, 2014 at 3:00 p.m in Montreat College Bell Library.  Public is invited. Refreshments will be served.See More
Sep 25
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

A contemporary tour of Asheville 1916

Walk through Asheville, spring 1916by Rob Neufeld                       You will be impressed by how clean the streets are.  It wasn’t that way twenty years earlier, when Patton Ave. got muddy in wet weather; horses had to be swept after; and women feared going downtown because their long skirts…See More
Sep 23
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a blog post

Vintage Postal Stamp ( Poem )

Vintage Postal Stamp ( Poem )Turn of the century Vintage Stamps Traceable history make value enhancePrices get higher as the years go by Dream of finding one valued so highExtremely fine with the perfect gum Designer flaws bring high premiumFamous from error illustration Collection of art inspirationWe are crazy for detailed graphics Finding rare depends on the marketsUnused are the old collectibles Their worth can be unbelievableView history with a new focus My playlist is something to…See More
Sep 23

Few things please as much as the right book

by Rob Neufeld

 

            For a sawbuck or two, you can get something priceless to put in a chum’s gift bag.

            Most likely, unless a bespectacled bird has whispered in your ear, you’ll have to invest a good deal of thought into your choosing, and then sample an array of intriguing titles in a Bombay of book shelves and e-lists.

            I present the following front table of recommendations on the chance that a few may click for you.  Did I read them all?  No.  I did some; and the others I vetted by consulting other reviewers and examining the books in hand.

            My main bias is style.  I reject the tendentious and glib, and favor simplicity backed by authority, feeling, and narrative strength—whether the book is a romance or a study.  My longer list can be viewed on the website, “The Read on WNC.”

 

Nemesis by Philip Roth (Houghton Mifflin hardcover, Oct. 2010; Vintage paperback, Oct. 2011, 304 pages, $15)

Roth has just announced that this book, his 31st, is his last.  It is a straightforward character story—involving a camp counselor, his fiancée, and a close-knit community.  And it’s also an expert evocation of a time with which people in this region are familiar: 1944, the polio epidemic.

The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers (Little, Brown hardcover, Sept. 2012, 240 pages, $24.99)

The Richmond, Virginia-raised author, who served as an Army machine-gunner in Iraq, provides an unsparing look at battle and home, including the protagonist’s inability to save a friend and his troubled attempts to piece vivid memories into a completed puzzle.  Having gotten an MFA in poetry after the war, Powers crafts descriptive sentences that are resonant but not overheavy.  “As I reflect on how I felt and behaved as a boy of twenty-one from my position of safety in a warm cabin above a clear stream in the Blue Ridge,” the returned-home narrator says, “I can only tell myself…We only pay attention to rare things, and death was not rare.”

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House hardcover, Nov. 2010, 496 pages, $27)

The story of Lt. Louis Zamperini, child delinquent; redeemed Olympic runner; airplane crash survivor; and P.O.W.—as told by author of “Seabiscuit.”

 

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable (Viking hardcover, Apr. 2011; Penguin trade paper, Dec. 2011, 608 pages, $18).  Alex Haley’s standard, co-authored autobiography intrudes Haley’s conclusion and short-changes politics and Malcolm X’s many masks, Marable says.

 

Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories by Sherman Alexie (Grove Press hardcover, Oct. 2012, 480 pages, $27).

Alexie, author of “Reservation Blues,” makes “This American Life” sound like American blithe.

 

Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures by Emma Straub (Riverhead hardcover, Sept. 2012, 320 pages, $26.95)

You want pop?  Straub, Peter’s daughter, pens an inside-the-industry novel about a girl who becomes a movie starlet and loses her identity.  Laura’s not deep—as her life dictates—but she is pure in a way, and the smooth prose reflects that.

 

Apollo’s Angels: A History of Ballet by Jennifer Homans (Random House hardcover, Nov. 2010; trade paper, Nov. 2011, 672 pages, $20)

Commercial tie-ins, which dominate the market, are not my thing; but enhancing popular experiences is, and that goes for going beyond the best reality shows, such as “So You Think You Can Dance.”  Homan’s history of ballet gets inside the mind and body of a dancer, seeking forms that transport character; and within a storytelling tradition.  She presents the “art of memory,” not just memorized but physically ingested.  The story begins in Renaissance France, with a wedding performance that accompanied “tournaments, a horse ballet, and fireworks.”

 

Smithsonian Fashion by Dorling Kindersley staff (DK large format hardcover, Oct. 2012, 480 pages, $50).

From ancient Egypt and Greece to Heidi Klum, the book boasts remarkable scope, detail, and illustration.

 

The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deb Perelman (Knopf hardcover, Oct. 2012, 336 pages, $35).  Perelman at first seems too cute and glib, but she delivers with prose and with recipes that make you want to rush to the skillet.  She tells stories, such as the time her mother beamed when Deb’s friend called Deb a pancake snob.  Her 10-ingredient pancakes from scratch involves covering the pools of batter with peach slices. “I hadn’t anticipated the marriage of peaches and sour cream to be so weepingly delicious,” she writes.  “The sugar in the peaches, it caramelizes in the butter and then melts into the pancake.”

 

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt (Norton hardcover, Sept. 2011; trade paper, Sept. 2012, 368 pages, $16.95)

A long-lost book changed the world, Greenblatt relates in a dramatic story, and ushered in the Renaissance.

 

Descent by Kathryn Stripling Byer (LSU Press, Nov. 2012, 68 pages, $17.95)

Cullowhee poet Byer’s newest is a landmark, as always.  This title appeared on my recent “New Books of the Region” list.  See more new WNC Books.

 

The Best American Science Writing 2012 edited by Michio Kaku (HarperCollins: Ecco trade paper, Sept. 2012, $14.99)

I’m a big fan of the HarperCollins and Houghton Mifflin series of best journalistic writing along several themes.

 

This Is What It Smells Like by Cathy Adams (New Libri Press e-book)

Former Montreat College teacher now living in China has published, for Kindle and Nook book readers, a story set in a fictional college town near Asheville.  The contemporary, irreverent drama involves a returning father, dysfunctional mother, family secret, and a narrator who has an exceptional sense of smell.  More and more local writers—including acclaimed author Charles Price with his new novel, “Sweetgrass: A Literary Western,” are turning to e-publishing in the wake of commercial publishing’s neglect of unpromoted quality.

 

The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories edited by Ann and Jeff Vandermeer (Tor Books hardcover, May 2012; trade paper, May 2012, 1,152 pages, $29.99)

112 stories, written 1908-2010—not vampires and werewolves—plus a “Foreweird” and “Afterweird” that give a thorough history of the anti-genre.

 

The Expats by Chris Pavone (Crown hardcover, March 2012, 336 pages, $26)

I keep searching for genre fiction with natural style.  Here’s one—a spy thriller, the heroine of which has a double-life as a mom.

 

The News from Spain: 7 Variations on a Love Story by Joan Wickersham (Knopf hardcover, Oct. 2012, 224 pages, $24.95)

This one’s not on anyone’s best of 2012 lists yet, as far as I can tell.  The stories—some fiction, some historical—examine relationships with close scrutiny and subtly.

Gold by Chris Cleave (Simon & Schuster hardcover, July 3, 2012, $27)

Little Bee author writes about ethical dilemmas of athletes Zoe and Kate going to compete in Olympics in London.

Goodbye for Now by Laurie Frankel (Doubleday hardcover, Aug. 7, 2012, $ 26)

Contemporary love story about an internet dating company worker who can't get a date.

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