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East Asheville history and sites

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Feb 27.

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

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Susan Weinberg posted events
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Kathryn Hall posted a blog post

Aim for Beauty

In honor of my blog Plant Whatever Brings You Joy's 10th Blogiversary I've posted a chapter from my book Plant Whatever Brings You Joy: Blessed Wisdom from the Garden. This particular chapter was also excerpted in Fairview's GreenPrints magazine, which was greatly appreciated. Read more here: http://plantwhateverbringsyoujoy.com/aim-for-beauty/…See More
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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

McCrumb ghost-opened world in The Unquiet Grave

McCrumb sees stories behind haunting ghost by Rob NeufeldPHOTO: Sharyn McCrumb and her dog Arthur, 2017.  Photo by Laura Palmer, courtesy, Sharyn McCrumb In “The Unquiet Grave,” Sharyn McCrumb once again demonstrates her mastery at turning a folktale into something larger, different, and greater.The legend of the…See More
Sep 10
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

James Vestus Miller

­HISTORIC PHOTO James Vester Miller James Vester Miller had been a boy when his mother, a Rutherfordton slave, had responded to Emancipation by taking her three children to Asheville and getting a job as a cook in a boardinghouse—some say Julia Wolfe’s boardinghouse, Old Kentucky Home.  Growing up, Miller hung…See More
Aug 26
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Dave Minneman and a sense of justiceby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Dave Minneman doing research at Pack Memorial Library.  Photo by author.            “One of the biggest things I did as a kid, in order to escape my father,” Asheville resident Dave Minneman says of his 1960s and 70s rural Indiana childhood, “was…See More
Aug 25
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Dellinger's Mill, Hawk, Mitchell County

Meet the 4th generation miller of a historic millby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Triptych of Dellinger Mill and Jack Dellinger in his mill, showing the hopper, the 1859 waterwheel, bags of cornmeal, and the National Historic Place plaque.  Photos and composition by Henry Neufeld.            I had written about…See More
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Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

FullSizeRender Lexie in the pillows

This is my little Lexie, a chihuahua mix who is tiny but so sweet. Here she is trying to sleep under my pillows. She is a burrower. Makes a great watch dog because she has a fierce bark.
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall posted an event

Tribute to Kathryn Stripling Byer at Jackson County Public Library, Sylva, NC

October 1, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
On October 1, Sunday afternoon, 2 PM, at Jackson County  Library in the Community Room, NCWN and NCWN-West will honor the late Poet Laureate, Kathryn S. Byer . Everyone is invited to come. We will share her poetry and talk about her achievements and her legacy for writers and poets in NC. If Kay touched your life in some way, come and pay tribute to her. We all miss her and this is a way to share our mourning for losing her and show our appreciation for what she did for us. See More
Aug 10
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"On Saturday, September 9, 10:30 a.m., Richard Kraweic will teach a class at Writers Circle. He will teach how to organize a poetry book for publication. I know I need to learn that lesson. How about you?"
Aug 10
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"We have a memoir class going on now until the first Wednesday in September. Wish you could join us in a class at Writers Circle around the Table."
Aug 10
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East Asheville history and sites

A meaningful tour of East Asheville PHOTO CAPTION: View of Beverly Hills suburb, from a painting by Gibson Catlett that had once hung at subdivision offices.  Courtesy Special Collection, Ramsey Library, UNC Asheville.            I was walking in the Beverly Hills neighborhood the other day and noticed a few…See More
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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Gail Godwin’s latest crosses a mental boundary by Rob Neufeld Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m. “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Aug 3
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Poetrio reading at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

August 6, 2017 from 3pm to 4pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured Poetrio poet at Malaprop's Bookstore/Café on Sunday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Julia will be reading from her new book A Part of Me. Fred Chappell says of A Part of Me: "Duncan's every reader will be reminded of some person, place, or time important to recall in a quiet hour."See More
Jul 28

Portrait of a local bookstore: Firestorm

by Rob Neufeld

 

PHOTO CAPTION: Joey Kasanke, Libertie Valance, and Jaime Theophilos (l to r), collective members of Firestorm Books, stand at the entrance to their co-op bookstore.

            Seven months ago, Firestorm Books and Coffee moved from downtown Asheville to 610 Haywood Road in West Asheville, inaugurating a new era in the evolving cooperative’s history.

            Now, it is a general bookstore—West Asheville’s only—as well as a one-of-a-kind, go-to place for exploring millennial views of alternative history.

            By “alternative history,” I don’t mean science fiction about what our future would look like if some key event in the past had gone differently—though Firestorm is rich in such titles.  I mean what our present time looks like as a new generation of idealists and activists turn away from what they see as failed policies.

            I love independent bookstores.  Each store’s entire inventory, and not just its staff picks, reflects independent choices; and the shop expresses a personality that makes it a destination location.

            Let’s go on a tour of Firestorm.

 

First insight

 

            “Staff Picks” is on the right as you come in the door.  I see that Joey has featured Jamaica Kincaid’s travel essay, “A Small Place,” about Antigua, and I’m glad for that.  I want to read it now.

            And Mary Beth, who oversees the café, has on her shelf, “The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America.”  She got a degree in Environmental Studies at UNC Asheville; and carries a beat-up bird book (a Peterson guide) in her back pocket.  “I love guide books that encourage people to interact with the natural world,” she says.

            The café is vegan; I had a latte with almond milk.

            The thing that really grabbed my attention on the Staff Picks shelves was the collection of books on anarchism—a term that demands a better understanding than what the media generally allows us, if understanding what’s going on today matters to us.

            “There isn’t one anarchism,” store co-founder Libertie Valance says.  Anarchism “is an umbrella term for a family of philosophies that take as their root...the desirability of a society free of coercion.”

 

Not granddad’s rad

 

            I am ready to be educated because I still hear the echoes of fear coming from the anarchist scare of the 1910s, when one branch of anti-capitalist, anti-government dissidents had set off bombs to make their points.

            That was also the time of horrific workplace abuses, such as the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire, so our view may be skewed by the news-making violence of the era.

            By World War II, Andrew Cornell writes in his brand new book, “Unruly Equality,” “a new generation of anarchists looked to radical pacifism,” and developed a philosophy “that advocated (that) individuals focus on living their own lives in a fashion that resembled their ideals as closely as possible.”

            Today, Cindy Milstein writes in her pocket-sized primer, “Anarchism and Its Aspirations,” “the world is increasingly messy.”  That’s a gentle way of putting it.  “Rather than retreating,” she says, “it’s imperative that we advance toward an egalitarian community of communities.”

            So, what we have in today’s anarchist movement is something that’s remarkably utopian—no hierarchies!—and also willing to be pragmatic, acknowledging that achieving a world society that operates as a federation of small, democratic, trusting councils is going to take time and trials.

            Demonstrating this self-awareness, there’s a bookstore favorite, “Come Hell or High Water: A Handbook of Collective Process Gone Awry” by Delfina Vannucci and Richard Singer.  It includes stick-figure cartoons, such as the one in which a youth points at a devil figure and says, “Look out!  It’s the process tyrant!”  And the tyrant roars, “Obey every radical norm!”

            Firestorm follows its principles in its business practices: decision by consensus; shared profits; politically-themed events, but no electoral ones; and ecological policies.  It has also adapted to situations by, for instance, creating a division of labor when it decided to manage its café separately from its bookstore.       

 

More of the tour

 

            The minds behind the philosophical practice section of Firestorm, now also showcasing fiction, have provided an exciting selection.

            On the “New Arrivals” table and among the 3,000 fiction and non-fiction titles shelved along four long aisles behind it, some special books emerge from my buyer’s blind spot.

            Among prominent novels such as Salman Rushdie’s latest, “Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights” (he’s at UNC Asheville, Feb. 18), and classics, such as a strong collection of English Romantic poets, there are the following works that get a boost from the new Zeitgeist.

            “The Automobile Club of Egypt” by Alaa Al Aswany reveals a family caught up in the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, giving us a workers’ perspective with many suspenseful cliff-hangers.

            “Welcome to Night Vale” turns a popular podcast into a novel that combines the spirit and style of two previous eras’ cult favorites, “The Twilight Zone” TV show and Douglas Adams’ “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.”

            “The Gap of Time” by Jeanette Winterson modernizes Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale” by portraying the banishment of a baby daughter by a London hedge fund manager; and by enlarging upon the personal and redemptive elements.

            Along the right-hand wall, a how-to section includes valuable guides to home-building, forest-harvesting, food preparation, and the like, thanks to a crew of consultants drawn from local patrons.

            On the left, on the way to the café, the zine collection thrives with publications so homemade, I got stabbed by a staple binding “It’s Down to This,” reflections and critiques about community and sexual violence.  The great discovery was the Doris series, in which the author keeps a narrative journal that exhibits a wonderfully wry, innocent, contemporary, non-mainstream voice.

            In back is a decent children’s section, which includes, “3 Sleeps,” gorgeously illustrated by West Asheville resident, Shannon Capezzali. 

            I should also note that, as I was sampling Firestorm’s offerings, and commenting on various things, staff members sometimes came over to recommend titles in a non-intrusive, informed way.  This wasn’t the disinterested hipster mode you sometimes experience in cool commissaries.  These people mean business in the best customer-service sense.

FIRESTORM EVENTS

 

History professor David Gilbert conducts a discussion of his book, “The Product of Our Souls: Ragtime, Race, and the Birth of the Manhattan Musical Marketplace,” today, 5 to 7 p.m., at Firestorm Cafe & Books, 610 Haywood Rd., West Asheville (255-8115).

 

Matissa Kent-White, author, and Shannon Capezzali, illustrator, present their new children’s book, “3 Sleeps,” and give a bilingual reading, 11 a.m., Feb. 27.

 

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