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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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City Lights Bookstore posted events
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Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon at Montreat College, Gaither Fellowship Hall

June 10, 2017 from 12pm to 2:30pm
Author Vicki Lane, who is working on her seventh novel, will be the guest speaker at the Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon at noon on Saturday, June 10, 2017 in Gaither Fellowship Hall.  Reservations: 669-8012 Ext. 3502Open to the Public.See More
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Rose Senehi posted an event

Rose Senehi will read from her new novel: CAROLINA BELLE at MALAPROPS BOOKS & CAFE

May 3, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
Belle McKenzie is obsessed with finding the best apple anyone ever bit into and determined to rekindle the love this obsession has nearly destroyed.        Woven throughout Carolina Belle is the fascinating history of Henderson County, North Carolina’s, apple orchards that endlessly unfold on the county’s horizons and still bear the same names as the early settlers to the area. Senehi, known for her historically accurate novels, sprinkles the book with stories of the development of the Southern…See More
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Becky Stone Presents Maya Angelou

Chautauqua Alive! Becky Stone Presents Maya AngelouWednesday, May 24 at 6:30pmPack Memorial Library67 Haywood Street250-4700The Buncombe Chautauqua Committee and Pack Memorial Library will present a pre-Chautauqua special event in Lord Auditorium at Pack Memorial Library at 6:30 Pm on May 24.  Renowned storyteller Becky Stone will present “Becoming Maya Angelou.”   Ms. Stone will be appearing as Maya Angelou in the opening program of the annual Chautauqua series that begins June 19.  On May 24,…See More
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City Lights Bookstore posted events
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Prize-winning YA author Sedgwick at Literacy fundraiser

Fundraiser for Literacy Council & Book Launch Marcus Sedgwick Tuesday April 25th 5:30-7:30 p.m., Twisted Laurel, downtown Asheville, 130 College Street COST: $45 per person (ticket includes hardcover book, food, and non-alcoholic beverage) All proceeds go to Literacy Council from press release Marcus Sedgwick, author of Saint Death Spellbound Children's Bookshop, Asheville's locally owned independent bookstore for kids and teens, presents a special event with one of the most critically…See More
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Dellinger Mill--sacred place east of Bakersville

A Mitchell County gristmill sifts through 150 yearsby Rob Neufeld PHOTO CAPTION: Book cover, “Dellinger Grist Mill on Cane Creek” by Jack Dellinger.             In 1861, when Bakersville got a post office, locals changed the town name from Bakersville to Davis, after Jefferson Davis, President of the…See More
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Reading by Poet Al Young at Table Rock Room, Plemmons Student Union, App State University

April 6, 2017 from 7:30pm to 8:45pm
A reading by past California Poet Laureate Al Young in Appalachian State's Hughlene Bostian Frank Visiting Writers Series. The reading will be preceded by a craft talk titled "No Poem, No Home" from 2-3:15 the same day.Both are in ASU's Plemmons Student Union. Free admission; books will be available for sale and signing. See More
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Citizen science author in Asheville April 6

Eco author in Asheville April 6 Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson…See More
Mar 23
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Appalachian Authors Book Signing and Reading at Historic Carson House

April 8, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author and reader at the Appalachian Authors  Book Signing and Reading to be held at the Historic Carson House on Saturday, April 8 from 10-3. She will debut her new poetry collection A Part of Me. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.See More
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2012 Award Winner for Literature -- Gary Neil Carden

A literature and drama teacher turned storyteller, Gary Neil Carden is an award winning playwright whose tales are informed by mountain life in North Carolin...
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Gary Carden updated their profile
Mar 22

Eco author in Asheville April 6

 

Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies

 

Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson College environmental science professor.

 

The San Francisco Chronicle named Citizen Scientist one of the best books of 2016. 

 

“Citizen science is our best strategy for stemming the sixth mass extinction going on right now, and the disastrous loss of biodiversity in general,” Hannibal says.

Check out: 

https://www.workman.com/products/citizen-scientist 

www.maryellenhannibal.com

 

Becoming a Citizen Scientist

by Mary Ellen Hannibal

 

Citizen science is the grand tradition of the amateur, and in general means regular people contributing to science.  It’s a very old practice, in which you can rub historical elbows with the likes of Aristotle and Thomas Jefferson.  Beyond Western European traditions, indigenous cultures have long observed nature to create “traditional ecological knowledge.”  Charles Darwin is perhaps the poster child for citizen science.  He did not have an advanced degree, and he worked under the aegis of no institution.  Darwin made direct observations of nature from which he developed his ideas about evolution by way of natural selection.  His thought, and those of natural selection’s co-creator Alfred Russel Wallace, was based in biogeography – where we find what plants and animals, in what amounts, and how they got there.  These concepts are the basis for how citizen science can help save nature today.

 

Here’s how I became a citizen scientist.  While researching my 2009 book Evidence of Evolution, I interviewed scores of PhD scientists virtually all of whom said, “I’ll help you understand how life begins, but let me tell you first how it is prematurely terminating.”  Upwards of 23,000 species today are threatened with extinction.  In just the past 40 years, wild species populations have shrunk in alarming numbers:  39% of marine wildlife and 76% of freshwater wildlife are gone.  A billion birds have disappeared from the continent since 1970.[1]

 

My life changed when I fully grokked this.  I wrote my next book, The Spine of the Continent, to help explain how and why it’s happening.  Along the way I asked myself, “What could scale to actually save nature?” I reported on the valiant efforts of many – scientists as well as nonprofit and agency personnel – but the basic news is not good.  We are losing nature at a horrifying rate that is not letting up.  Is anything working here?

 

Researching The Spine I participated in some citizen science projects.  I helped monitor the health of Utah forests, which led to changes in grazing rules.  I participated in carnivore tracking in Arizona, which helped establish highway overpasses to help wildlife avoid becoming roadkill.  I joined teams of people from multiple ages, races, and walks of life.  No one talked politics.  Once people observe and document nature, they are likely to become advocates for their study subject. I saw this happen with my own eyes.  Direct participation in nature helps save it.

 

Today citizen science is turbo-charged by smartphone technology and vast computing power – I don’t think we have yet begun to unpack its potential.  I was inspired to write Citizen Scientist to investigate that and to help spread the word.

 

One of the biggest impediments to saving nature is that we have incomplete information about where it is, in what amounts, at any given time.  This goes back to that biogeography context for understanding evolution.  Evolution of course not only encompasses how life begins, but how it ends.  Extinction is a natural part of evolution, but today it is occurring at a vastly accelerated rate due to human impacts.  Folded into my book are stories about the discovery process behind some of the major concepts around how and why too much extinction happens.

 

The biggest culprit in worldwide species reduction is habitat loss.  When new development is on the docket, we need to be more informed about the habitat being displaced.  Data collected even from urban decks and suburban back yards (with highly vetted programs like eBird and iNaturalist), can help create a better picture of what species are on the landscape.  Plants are ground zero for documenting the impacts of climate change on the biotic world, and projects that monitor when buds open and leaves drop (Budburst and Nature’s Notebook) are essential to helping plan adaptation strategies in a time of uncertainty and change.

 

Citizen science is about much more than data points.  It is about being where you are, knowing what other life forms are present with you.  It entails appreciating how living and nonliving systems create the world we call home, and how all this evolved. The citizen scientist, of course, is an amateur – the root of that word is from the Latin, amo, amare, meaning to love.  One of the very best things about citizen science is that it is flexible and can incorporate dimensions of history, literature, art, and direct personal experience. This is our time, this is our place:  discovering these dimensions of life is a revelation that helps us co-create a vibrant future.  Co-creation is citizen science.

 

[1] The World Wildlife Fund’s 2014 Living Planet Report and The State of North America’s Birds Report.

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