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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Connie Regan-Blake posted events
yesterday
Mirra updated an event
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Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
Saturday
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

How to make a monument Waynesville style

For a monument in a parking lotHow might an artist portray a Plott?The Forga family owns the only downtown parking lot in Hazelwood and wants a statue of a Plott Hound, the N.C. State Dog, put at its center in honor of the late Robert Forga and his wife, Viola.   The family engaged the Waynesville Public Art Commission to find an artist, and now the decision’s down to three There’s a N.C. Highway Historical Marker about the Plott Hound at Hazelwood Elementary School in Waynesville.  The dog’s…See More
May 5
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at MACA Gift Shop

May 6, 2017 from 9am to 11:30am
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her latest books "A Part of Me" and "A Place That Was Home" on Saturday, May 6, from 9-11:30 at the MACA gift shop in downtown Marion.See More
May 3
Short-short Stories & Riddles shared their blog post on Facebook
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much Mickey MantlePete HillRocky ColavitoDusty BakerCurt FloodMickey RiversCory Snyder List of baseball outfielders with names that have to do with layers of the earth, in order of sports greatness.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

A riddle

Tying shoelaces,Lifting a mug by its handle,Lifting something that requires all fingers,Pressing down hard while writing,Shaking hands:Things hindered by a bruised forefinger. I would have had more things to record, but unfortunately my finger healed too quickly.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
Apr 30
Dr. Lin Stepp posted an event

Dr. Lin Stepp at Barnes & Noble, Asheville Mall at Tunnel Road

May 13, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
Lin Stepp will sign her latest Smoky Mtn novel DADDY'S GIRL set in NCSee More
Apr 27

Eco author in Asheville April 6

 

Citizen science can foster earth-saving policies

 

Journalist Mary Ellen Hannibal, author of Citizen Scientist: Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction, speaks at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 6 in conversation with Mallory McDuff, Warren Wilson College environmental science professor.

 

The San Francisco Chronicle named Citizen Scientist one of the best books of 2016. 

 

“Citizen science is our best strategy for stemming the sixth mass extinction going on right now, and the disastrous loss of biodiversity in general,” Hannibal says.

Check out: 

https://www.workman.com/products/citizen-scientist 

www.maryellenhannibal.com

 

Becoming a Citizen Scientist

by Mary Ellen Hannibal

 

Citizen science is the grand tradition of the amateur, and in general means regular people contributing to science.  It’s a very old practice, in which you can rub historical elbows with the likes of Aristotle and Thomas Jefferson.  Beyond Western European traditions, indigenous cultures have long observed nature to create “traditional ecological knowledge.”  Charles Darwin is perhaps the poster child for citizen science.  He did not have an advanced degree, and he worked under the aegis of no institution.  Darwin made direct observations of nature from which he developed his ideas about evolution by way of natural selection.  His thought, and those of natural selection’s co-creator Alfred Russel Wallace, was based in biogeography – where we find what plants and animals, in what amounts, and how they got there.  These concepts are the basis for how citizen science can help save nature today.

 

Here’s how I became a citizen scientist.  While researching my 2009 book Evidence of Evolution, I interviewed scores of PhD scientists virtually all of whom said, “I’ll help you understand how life begins, but let me tell you first how it is prematurely terminating.”  Upwards of 23,000 species today are threatened with extinction.  In just the past 40 years, wild species populations have shrunk in alarming numbers:  39% of marine wildlife and 76% of freshwater wildlife are gone.  A billion birds have disappeared from the continent since 1970.[1]

 

My life changed when I fully grokked this.  I wrote my next book, The Spine of the Continent, to help explain how and why it’s happening.  Along the way I asked myself, “What could scale to actually save nature?” I reported on the valiant efforts of many – scientists as well as nonprofit and agency personnel – but the basic news is not good.  We are losing nature at a horrifying rate that is not letting up.  Is anything working here?

 

Researching The Spine I participated in some citizen science projects.  I helped monitor the health of Utah forests, which led to changes in grazing rules.  I participated in carnivore tracking in Arizona, which helped establish highway overpasses to help wildlife avoid becoming roadkill.  I joined teams of people from multiple ages, races, and walks of life.  No one talked politics.  Once people observe and document nature, they are likely to become advocates for their study subject. I saw this happen with my own eyes.  Direct participation in nature helps save it.

 

Today citizen science is turbo-charged by smartphone technology and vast computing power – I don’t think we have yet begun to unpack its potential.  I was inspired to write Citizen Scientist to investigate that and to help spread the word.

 

One of the biggest impediments to saving nature is that we have incomplete information about where it is, in what amounts, at any given time.  This goes back to that biogeography context for understanding evolution.  Evolution of course not only encompasses how life begins, but how it ends.  Extinction is a natural part of evolution, but today it is occurring at a vastly accelerated rate due to human impacts.  Folded into my book are stories about the discovery process behind some of the major concepts around how and why too much extinction happens.

 

The biggest culprit in worldwide species reduction is habitat loss.  When new development is on the docket, we need to be more informed about the habitat being displaced.  Data collected even from urban decks and suburban back yards (with highly vetted programs like eBird and iNaturalist), can help create a better picture of what species are on the landscape.  Plants are ground zero for documenting the impacts of climate change on the biotic world, and projects that monitor when buds open and leaves drop (Budburst and Nature’s Notebook) are essential to helping plan adaptation strategies in a time of uncertainty and change.

 

Citizen science is about much more than data points.  It is about being where you are, knowing what other life forms are present with you.  It entails appreciating how living and nonliving systems create the world we call home, and how all this evolved. The citizen scientist, of course, is an amateur – the root of that word is from the Latin, amo, amare, meaning to love.  One of the very best things about citizen science is that it is flexible and can incorporate dimensions of history, literature, art, and direct personal experience. This is our time, this is our place:  discovering these dimensions of life is a revelation that helps us co-create a vibrant future.  Co-creation is citizen science.

 

[1] The World Wildlife Fund’s 2014 Living Planet Report and The State of North America’s Birds Report.

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