Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

AHS football team, first year of integration

Asheville High integration played out on the football teamby Rob Neufeld Part 1 of 2             “We should have had a championship team,” Willie Ray, now a pastor, says about the 1969 Asheville High School football team for which he played on the offensive and defensive lines.            That was the…See More
Tuesday
Ali Mangkang posted events
Feb 25
Gary Carden commented on Gary Carden's event Gary Neil Carden
"The time of the March 6 performance is 7:30 p.m."
Feb 25
Gary Carden posted an event

Gary Neil Carden at A-B Tech

March 6, 2015 at 7pm to March 7, 2015 at 2pm
WNC Historical Association will sponsor a concert (staged) reading of Gary Carden's play, "The Raindrop Waltz" in the Ferguson Auditorium on March 6th at 7:00 and March 7th at 2:00pm. The playwright will attend the performances and will enter into a dialogue with the audience about the autobiographical content of the play. A-B Tech is on 340 Victoria Road in Asheville.See More
Feb 24
Spellbound posted events
Feb 20
Jerald Pope posted an event

Reading cancelled tonight at Black Mountain

February 19, 2015 from 6pm to 7pm
The reading on Thursday, Feb 19 of David Madden's new book at the Monte Vista Hotel in Black Mountain has been cancelled. It will be rescheduled. See More
Feb 19
Susan Lorraine Norwood posted photos
Feb 10
Jerald Pope posted an event

Madden Reads from Latest Collection of Short Stories at Monte Vista Hotel

February 19, 2015 from 6pm to 7pm
The Black Mountain Authors Guild will present local author David Madden reading from his collection of short stories, The Last Bizarre Tale­, Thursday, February 19, 6pm, at the Monte Vista Hotel. With titles like “Who Killed Harpo Marx?” and “James Agee Never Lived in This House,” Maddens stories range wide over time, geography, and the human soul. In “The Last Bizarre Tale,” for example, a young man witnesses strange behavior involving a corpse that has hung on a hook in a funeral home garage…See More
Feb 9
Michael Hopping updated their profile
Feb 9
Jane Blue posted an event

Earth Week Celebration in Andrews NC at Andrews NC, various location throughout the town

April 22, 2015 to April 26, 2015
A special celebration honoring the local and regional talents of Andrews NC and Cherokee County, featuring author readings and book signings by Gary Carden, Wayne Caldwell, Anna Berenyi and hopefully more authors of Appalachia. Drummings, Native American crafts, Nature walks, Backyard remedies, Native Bees, Animals of the Forest, Country and Blue Grass Music and so much more.See More
Feb 4
Ali Mangkang updated their profile
Jan 28
Ali Mangkang posted an event

Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award at Asheville Renaissance Hotel

February 7, 2015 from 5pm to 7pm
Honoring Author Robert Morgan for his selected work"The Road From Gap Creek". The presentation of the award includes a reading followed by a reception.For more informationSee More
Jan 28
Chevin Woodruff shared their event on Facebook
Jan 27
Chevin Woodruff posted an event
Thumbnail

An Evening with Barbara Woodall at Splendor Mountain at Splendor Mountain

January 27, 2015 from 6pm to 8pm
Barbara Taylor Woodall was born and raised in Rabun County Georgia. This county touches both North Carolina and South Carolina, so you can already guess it was a special place to grow a child. Barbara wrote about her life as a child and the wonderful people God joined her to as she grew and learned. It's Not My Mountain Anymore tells some of these stories. Barbara will share from her book and from her life, June 6, 2015 at Splendor Mountain.See More
Jan 27
Avery Ray McKinney Jr. updated their profile
Jan 23
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

David Joy Presents His Debut Novel at City Lights Bookstore

March 6, 2015 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Webster author, David Joy will present his new novel on Friday, March 6th at 6:30 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore.  Where All Light Tends to Go, a staff pick of both Chris and Eon, is set in Jackson County and tells the story of Jacob McNeely, a young man who is in a fight against his fate. “Expertly balancing beauty and brutality, David has written a novel that stays with the reader long after the final page has been read.  Where All Light Tends to Go, though very much an Appalachian tale, is…See More
Jan 22

Work hard, play hard, was the way of Biltmore boys

by Rob Neufeld

Read Part 1, about Biltmore boys in 1930s

Read Part 3.

 

            Motorists on the Biltmore Estate approach road in the early 1940s “would stop in amazement,” when the Austin boys took their dogs to the swamp to chase rabbits, Mark-Ellis Bennett wrote in the “Biltmore Beacon.”

            Harold and Ruel, sons of the estate’s Chief Ranger, Claude C. Austin, had a menagerie in tow, Ruel recalled in an interview with Bennett.  Their pets included “a fox, an opossum, a tomcat, a pair of shoats, and raccoons,” and their favorite companion, Jim the deer, whom they’d bottle-fed from fawnhood.

            “At home,” at the “kennel site” (named for the lodgings in which Edith Vanderbilt kept her purebred Saluki dogs), Ruel noticed how, on his porch, when it started to rain, Jim would chase his Great Dane away “to keep himself dry by the front door.”

            At age 13, after Ruel’s family had moved into the Biltmore House, Ruel went to work.  First, he did farm chores for $1.25 a day.  Then, he mowed lawns as a member of the “Grasshopper Gang”; and when a flu epidemic sapped the estate staff, he stood in for them, punching a time clock hourly as a night watchman.

            In Biltmore, during the lean years before the post-war boom, kids lived the country life, though also preoccupied, at an early age, by adventures in town and the lure of job opportunities.

            One adventure involved Tommy Koontz, a village resident, at Reed and Abee concrete plant on Warren Ave. (the company was acquired in 1958 by Asheville Concrete Materials; and in 1983, renamed Southern Concrete Materials).

            “They would dump their sand and rock into chutes, and the chutes went down into big hoppers that mixed concrete,” Koontz told me in a recent interview with him and his childhood friend, Winston Pulliam.  “The concrete trucks would back in under those things, and they’d open the holes in the mixers, and the rock and sand would go down in there. 

“One day, my brother and I and Billy McCoy (later killed in World War II) were playing on that chute, and they opened that lever down there, and that stuff started going down through there, and we started going with it.  There was a trough, and the only thing that saved us was a bar that went across that thing to level the sand and rock out.  We caught that bar, or we’d have gone down into that mixer.”           

Though not working on a farm, like Ruel, Tommy kept farmer’s hours.

            “When we ate dinner,” he recalled about his family, “within about an hour, we went to bed.  There were no cokes, no ice cream, no chocolate cake; you didn’t sit down around the TV.  When we finished eating and got cleaned up, and brought the wood and kindling in for the stove the next morning, we went to bed”—around 8 o’clock.  “Everybody was in the same situation.”

            “There was one thing we knew as kids,” Koontz continued, reflecting on hard times and built-in aspiration, “when you went south on Hendersonville Road, people on the right side (in Biltmore Forest) were different.  You knew that those people over there had things you didn’t have.  Because when I worked on the laundry truck, when I would take laundry to the door or pick up laundry, I never saw the owner of the house.  It was a maid.”

            “And if the maid wasn’t there,” added Pulliam, who lived in Oakley and played and worked in Biltmore, “you’d go in the house, and leave the laundry or milk.”  Delivering milk for Biltmore Dairy was another job boys had.

            “We had a funny saying,” Koontz recounted.  “They’d say, ‘Son, where do you live?’ and we’d say, ‘East Biltmore Forest.’”

            At age 11, Tommy went to work for Arthur Scott, a delivery man for Asheville Cleaners and Dyers.  Pulliam did likewise, making 25 cents a day.  At the interview, the two made a discovery about a fate they had shared.

            “I fell out of his laundry truck one day,” Pulliam said.

            “So did I!” Koontz exclaimed.

            “I fell out in Kenilworth.”

            “That’s where I fell out,” Koontz said.  “We were coming off of Tunnel Road, coming in through Kenilworth on the steep curve.  I was cold, and they had a heater under the dashboard, and I was sitting there leaned up against the door.  We went around that corner, the door went open, and I went!”

            Pulliam remarked on how much Scott, a relief man, who took jobs when regular drivers were off, had watched his pennies.

            “The first day I helped him,” Pulliam related, “we went to West Asheville.  There used to be a Saucy Sandwich Shop.  He ordered beef stew, I ordered beef stew.  I ordered everything he ordered (and Scott paid).  The next day, he made himself a cheese sandwich.”

            “I can’t believe you fell out of that truck,” Pulliam repeated.  “I did, too.  I wound up in a ditch.”

            Tommy had had his hand in his pockets because of the cold when he’d been thrown.  “I got one hand out,” he said, “and this scar that’s on my hand right here, that’s where I hit.  I was out there in the ditch, scared him to death.”

            “He left the laundry one time and went to work for Biltmore Dairy Farm,” Pulliam noted.  “I helped him on the milk truck, too.  I could drink all the lacto buttermilk I wanted.”

            Stories of the struggles and pleasures of hard times and community in Biltmore Village go to illustrate the ethics and energy with which its graduates sallied forth into the age of opportunity.  “There was something in people then,” Pulliam remarked.

            Next week, this column chronicles that rise to success.

 

PHOTO CAPTION

Claude C. Austin, Biltmore Estate chief ranger in the 1930s and 40s, plays with Jim the deer.  Photo courtesy Mark-Ellis Bennett and Ruel Austin.

Views: 218

Reply to This

© 2015   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service