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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Tale of Ononis

The Tale of Ononis by Rob Neufeld Part 1: The Making of a Celebrity ❧  Hare Begins His Tale  Ononis was my region’s name.People now call it Never-the-same.I’ll start with the day a delivery came. The package I got was a devil’s dare,Swaddled and knotted in Swamp Bloat hairAnd bearing, in red, one word: “Beware!” Bloats are creatures from the Land of Mud Pies,Wallowing in waste with tightly closed eyesUntil fears bring tears and the bleary bloats rise.   ❧  Hare’s Colleagues  I asked my boss,…See More
Friday
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Drop Your Troubles: A Solo Storytelling Performance with Connie Regan-Blake at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

December 1, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join this internationally renowned storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she transforms a packed theater into an intimate circle of friends with old-timey charm, wisdom, and humor. We’ll also welcome the Singer of  Stories, Donna Marie Todd, who will perform her original story, “The Amazing Zicafoose Sisters.” Connie’s last two shows at BMCA have sold…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story and Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Explore the Landscapes of Story & Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” The event will be hosted by the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, just a short drive from Asheville nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding the area. Call the Center for advance tickets (828) 669-0930 or order…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive, affirming…See More
Oct 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Oct 17
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

First Drumbeat

First Drumbeat(Part of Living Poem) The time has come.Call it a drum,Or a crumb,What’s left of life. I used to tell a jokeWhen my life was wide,And I was a stud,And not a dud—I knowI’m not a dud.  I’m a dude,A dad.  But everyone mustRebut the dud chargeAt summing up time. Oh yeah, the joke,A trademark one for meIn that it’s not funny. I used to say I’ll never retireFrom writingBecause if I’m ever…See More
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks for the prompt, Joan!  I have attached the whole work in progress as a doc at the bottom of the table of contents page: http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/special/living-poem"
Sep 22
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Is there a way from this website to print everything or might you send me such a document to bayjh@icloud.com?"
Sep 22
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
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Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Branch McDowell County Public Library

October 24, 2018 from 4pm to 5pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be launching her new poetry collection A Neighborhood Changes (Finishing Line Press, 2018) at a book presentation and signing to be held at the McDowell County Public Library in Marion on October 24.See More
Sep 21
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"This could be interesting--thanks!  I'm at 828-505-1973 (my home business office).  And RNeufeld@charter.net."
Sep 20

Annual commemoration on Botanical Gardens site inspires continual research

See also the historical insights of Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps.


The Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps commemorates the April 6, 1865 Civil War battle at the site--now Sycamore Meadow, UNCA Botanical Gardens, and surrounding area--2 to 4 p.m., April 3. The event features military services and an address by former Asheville mayor Charles Worley.

Was it a battle—or a skirmish, as the state and some historians deem? The question probes a living understanding of what really had gone on 145 years ago when the 101st Ohio Infantry and other Federal troops tested the mettle of the local home guard, some troops, convalescent soldiers, and others..

One of the issues is, “How could the two sides have exchanged fire all day yet have counted only a handful of casualties?” Peter Lorenz, Field and Staff Officer for the Corps, explains that the answer has to do with terrain and armaments.

The woods had been thick, the few hundred members of Asheville’s Confederate militia well-placed uphill, and the several hundred Federal troops able to get under the trajectory of the locals’ cannons.

“Poor quality fuses, inferior powder, and insufficient proper ammunition further hampered the usually crack shot artillery's efforts,” Lorenz adds. “Earlier in the war, after the Battle of Chancellorsville,” he notes, “a Confederate artilleryman commented that of every fifteen rounds of (exploding) shot fired, only one burst.”

Loremz compares the battle to the 1862 Battle of Hampton Roads, in which the Union and Confederate battleships Monitor and Merrimac (CSS Virginia) fired at each other for four hours with only one casualty. In any case, Asheville’s engagement represented the Union’s focus on Asheville as one of the last strongholds of the war.

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From the journal of Cornelia Henry, April 6-7, 1865:

Thursday 6th - Mr. Henry went to town this morning. About three o'clock we heard the yankees were in town but did not believe it till about four when George came up from the mill and said some men had come from town & said it was certainly so. Matt & I began to fix up things. Sam came and said Mr. Henry had gone on to the front and sent me word by Mrs. Owensby not to be alarmed. Sam took charge of the bacon. I am very uneasy about Mr. Henry.

Some soldiers (four) stay here tonight. I think they had better go on to Asheville. May a kind Heaven protect my dear husband this night and all our brave men and turn back our enemies. Oh! Lord, deliver us from our enemies I pray.

Friday 7th - Mr. Henry came home about eleven o'clock. I was so glad to see him. Matt & I were still up. I felt so distressed I could not sleep if I had gone to bed. Mr. Henry said we repulsed them handsomely. I am very glad of it. He thinks they will fight again today. It nearly killed me this morning to tell him good bye. He went to town this morning and came back about 12 o'clock and says the yankees left last night. I am so thankful. I believe the Lord heard my hearty felt prayer.

They took some prisoners at Rankin’s tan yard, some four or five. We had two men slightly wounded. We do not know the enemies’ loss as they were some six hundred yards apart, they left one leg in a boot. Our men acted well. The artillery played on them all the time. The negroes here heard it but I was upstairs when Matt was weaving so could not hear it. They fought down about Nick Woodfin’s farm. I do hope they may never come back again. The soldiers that staid here last night did not go towards Asheville this morning but up the river. I think they wanted to get away from the fight.

Mr. Henry woke up those soldiers after he came to know who they were. They said they belonged to Capt. Deaver’s company. We went to bed about 12 o'clock but Mr. Henry got uneasy so we got up and he went up & woke them up and they all went out to sleep. The first night Mr. Henry has ever slept out and I hope tis the last he will ever have to leave his nice warm bed.

The yankees killed one of N. W. Woodfin’s negroes for running. Old Sam don't believe the yankees would do anything wrong. I hope they may never get here to convince him. I am afraid they will give us a call sometime but I hope and pray not. Oh! Lord deliver us from our enemies I pray.

The 4-5 prisoners taken at the tanyard were colored union soldiers under Gen. Davis Tillson.  They were drum-court-martialed for assaulting an old man and woman and raping a young white woman who was the niece of the couple down near Flat Creek.  Only one of the soldiers was identified by the Uncle and that man gave up the names of four others who participated.  The four were shot under Gen. TIllson's orders and the man who gave up the names was executed the following morning.  One could see the graves opposite the old tannery on Main St as the drovers came into town.  In 1907 the forgotten skeletons of the men were found when they widened the road and they were re-interred elsewhere, some speculate to Gallows Hill which was just behind the area they were found as some graves have been found on the UNC-A property that one was Woodfin's Farm and across from the farm was Gallows Hill where a few executions took place previous to the the old city jail & gallows being builtdowntown around the turn of the century.  

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