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East Asheville history and sites

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Feb 27.

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

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City Lights Bookstore posted events
Saturday
Glenda Council Beall posted a photo

FullSizeRender Lexie in the pillows

This is my little Lexie, a chihuahua mix who is tiny but so sweet. Here she is trying to sleep under my pillows. She is a burrower. Makes a great watch dog because she has a fierce bark.
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall posted an event

Tribute to Kathryn Stripling Byer at Jackson County Public Library, Sylva, NC

October 1, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
On October 1, Sunday afternoon, 2 PM, at Jackson County  Library in the Community Room, NCWN and NCWN-West will honor the late Poet Laureate, Kathryn S. Byer . Everyone is invited to come. We will share her poetry and talk about her achievements and her legacy for writers and poets in NC. If Kay touched your life in some way, come and pay tribute to her. We all miss her and this is a way to share our mourning for losing her and show our appreciation for what she did for us. See More
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"On Saturday, September 9, 10:30 a.m., Richard Kraweic will teach a class at Writers Circle. He will teach how to organize a poetry book for publication. I know I need to learn that lesson. How about you?"
Aug 10
Glenda Council Beall commented on Glenda Council Beall's photo
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WRITERS CIRCLE IN SPRING

"We have a memoir class going on now until the first Wednesday in September. Wish you could join us in a class at Writers Circle around the Table."
Aug 10
Rob Neufeld's discussion was featured

East Asheville history and sites

A meaningful tour of East Asheville PHOTO CAPTION: View of Beverly Hills suburb, from a painting by Gibson Catlett that had once hung at subdivision offices.  Courtesy Special Collection, Ramsey Library, UNC Asheville.            I was walking in the Beverly Hills neighborhood the other day and noticed a few…See More
Aug 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Gail Godwin’s latest crosses a mental boundary by Rob Neufeld Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m. “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Aug 3
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Poetrio reading at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

August 6, 2017 from 3pm to 4pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured Poetrio poet at Malaprop's Bookstore/Café on Sunday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Julia will be reading from her new book A Part of Me. Fred Chappell says of A Part of Me: "Duncan's every reader will be reminded of some person, place, or time important to recall in a quiet hour."See More
Jul 28
Nancy Werking Poling posted an event

Nancy Werking Poling at Pack Library, downtown Asheville

August 9, 2017 from 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Nancy Werking Poling will read from her new book, Before It Was Legal: a black-white marriage (1945-1987).The Winters' forty-two-year marriage spanned key historical periods of the 20th century and took them from Indiana to Mexico City. Freed from U.S. racism, Daniel felt "as Mexican as chile verde." Meanwhile, Anna, a reserved white woman who struggled with speaking Spanish, experienced no similar sense of liberation. Before It Was Legal is not a happily-ever-after story, but an honest…See More
Jul 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 4
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jul 1
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 29
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3

Annual commemoration on Botanical Gardens site inspires continual research

See also the historical insights of Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps.


The Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps commemorates the April 6, 1865 Civil War battle at the site--now Sycamore Meadow, UNCA Botanical Gardens, and surrounding area--2 to 4 p.m., April 3. The event features military services and an address by former Asheville mayor Charles Worley.

Was it a battle—or a skirmish, as the state and some historians deem? The question probes a living understanding of what really had gone on 145 years ago when the 101st Ohio Infantry and other Federal troops tested the mettle of the local home guard, some troops, convalescent soldiers, and others..

One of the issues is, “How could the two sides have exchanged fire all day yet have counted only a handful of casualties?” Peter Lorenz, Field and Staff Officer for the Corps, explains that the answer has to do with terrain and armaments.

The woods had been thick, the few hundred members of Asheville’s Confederate militia well-placed uphill, and the several hundred Federal troops able to get under the trajectory of the locals’ cannons.

“Poor quality fuses, inferior powder, and insufficient proper ammunition further hampered the usually crack shot artillery's efforts,” Lorenz adds. “Earlier in the war, after the Battle of Chancellorsville,” he notes, “a Confederate artilleryman commented that of every fifteen rounds of (exploding) shot fired, only one burst.”

Loremz compares the battle to the 1862 Battle of Hampton Roads, in which the Union and Confederate battleships Monitor and Merrimac (CSS Virginia) fired at each other for four hours with only one casualty. In any case, Asheville’s engagement represented the Union’s focus on Asheville as one of the last strongholds of the war.

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From the journal of Cornelia Henry, April 6-7, 1865:

Thursday 6th - Mr. Henry went to town this morning. About three o'clock we heard the yankees were in town but did not believe it till about four when George came up from the mill and said some men had come from town & said it was certainly so. Matt & I began to fix up things. Sam came and said Mr. Henry had gone on to the front and sent me word by Mrs. Owensby not to be alarmed. Sam took charge of the bacon. I am very uneasy about Mr. Henry.

Some soldiers (four) stay here tonight. I think they had better go on to Asheville. May a kind Heaven protect my dear husband this night and all our brave men and turn back our enemies. Oh! Lord, deliver us from our enemies I pray.

Friday 7th - Mr. Henry came home about eleven o'clock. I was so glad to see him. Matt & I were still up. I felt so distressed I could not sleep if I had gone to bed. Mr. Henry said we repulsed them handsomely. I am very glad of it. He thinks they will fight again today. It nearly killed me this morning to tell him good bye. He went to town this morning and came back about 12 o'clock and says the yankees left last night. I am so thankful. I believe the Lord heard my hearty felt prayer.

They took some prisoners at Rankin’s tan yard, some four or five. We had two men slightly wounded. We do not know the enemies’ loss as they were some six hundred yards apart, they left one leg in a boot. Our men acted well. The artillery played on them all the time. The negroes here heard it but I was upstairs when Matt was weaving so could not hear it. They fought down about Nick Woodfin’s farm. I do hope they may never come back again. The soldiers that staid here last night did not go towards Asheville this morning but up the river. I think they wanted to get away from the fight.

Mr. Henry woke up those soldiers after he came to know who they were. They said they belonged to Capt. Deaver’s company. We went to bed about 12 o'clock but Mr. Henry got uneasy so we got up and he went up & woke them up and they all went out to sleep. The first night Mr. Henry has ever slept out and I hope tis the last he will ever have to leave his nice warm bed.

The yankees killed one of N. W. Woodfin’s negroes for running. Old Sam don't believe the yankees would do anything wrong. I hope they may never get here to convince him. I am afraid they will give us a call sometime but I hope and pray not. Oh! Lord deliver us from our enemies I pray.

The 4-5 prisoners taken at the tanyard were colored union soldiers under Gen. Davis Tillson.  They were drum-court-martialed for assaulting an old man and woman and raping a young white woman who was the niece of the couple down near Flat Creek.  Only one of the soldiers was identified by the Uncle and that man gave up the names of four others who participated.  The four were shot under Gen. TIllson's orders and the man who gave up the names was executed the following morning.  One could see the graves opposite the old tannery on Main St as the drovers came into town.  In 1907 the forgotten skeletons of the men were found when they widened the road and they were re-interred elsewhere, some speculate to Gallows Hill which was just behind the area they were found as some graves have been found on the UNC-A property that one was Woodfin's Farm and across from the farm was Gallows Hill where a few executions took place previous to the the old city jail & gallows being builtdowntown around the turn of the century.  

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