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Literacy Council of Buncombe Co. posted an event
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11th Annual Authors for Literacy Dinner & Silent Auction at Crowne Plaza Resort Expo Center

November 29, 2018 from 6pm to 9pm
New York Times bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver will keynote the Literacy Council of Buncombe County’s 11th Annual Authors for Literacy Dinner & Silent Auction on November 29, 2018. Barbara Kingsolver is the author of nine bestselling works of fiction, including the novels, Flight Behavior, The Lacuna, and The Poisonwood Bible, as well as books of poetry, essays, and the influential nonfiction bestseller Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life. She has won or been a finalist…See More
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Rap Monster updated their profile
Jun 13
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Featured at High Country Writers Meeting at Watauga County Public Library

June 14, 2018 from 10am to 12pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be the featured presenter at the High Country Writers Meeting on June 14, 10 a.m.-12 noon at the Watauga County Public Library in Boone. She will discuss her inspirations and the process of becoming a published author. She will present readings from her latest books A Part of Me and A Place That Was Home and give a preview of her forthcoming poetry collection A Neighborhood Changes. A book signing will follow her presentation.See More
Jun 7
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Julia Nunnally Duncan updated their profile
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Rapmonster.com ~ Join Our Digital Streaming Platform For Unsigned Hip Hop Artists

Hip hop artists can now sign up for a PRO UNLIMITED PLUS account. Get unlimited space to upload higher quality 320kbps MP3's, receive 2-3 radio spins a day on http://RapMonsterRadio.com  along with weekly blog promotion posts on over 65 hip hop websites.…See More
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#RapMonsterRadio Will Interview You On Our Hip Hop Rap Radio Station

Get interviewed by Lil Dee of Rap Monster Radio.  Rap Monster Radio is an online hip hop radio station with more than 60,000 listeners a month in over 180 countries.We will interview and provide you with an mp3 copy of the interview.Get the worldwide exposure you deserve.…See More
May 17
Caroline McIntyre posted events
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Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 21, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Saturday, April 21, 2018 at 7:30 pm, join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her "Taking the Stage" workshop participants, for an enchanting evening of storytelling in picturesque Black Mountain, NC. You'll enjoy a variety of stories and storytelling styles featuring tellers Jane O Cunningham from Rome, GA; Gabriele Marewski from Black Mountain, NC; Christine Phillips Westfeldt - Fairview,…See More
Mar 21
Glenda Council Beall posted a blog post

Writers Circle around the Table

We are located in Hayesville, NC. In April we begin our new season with outstanding Poet Mike James. Mike will read at Writers' Night Out in Blairsville, GA on Friday evening April 13. On Saturday, April 14, he will teach a class at my studio.Formally SpeakingThis class will focus on different types of traditional poetic forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, and the sestina, and will also include other verse forms such as erasures, found poems, prose poems, and last poems.Contact Glenda…See More
Mar 12
Caroline McIntyre posted an event
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Rachel Carson, Silent Spring Chautauqua History Alive at UNC Asheville, OLLI Reuters Center, Manheimer Room

April 15, 2018 from 3pm to 4:30pm
Step inside the revolutionary book, Silent Spring as its author Rachel Carson reveals the reckless destruction of our living world. Written more than 55 years ago Silent Spring inspired the Environmental Movement and has never been out of print. And now you have a chance to ask the author, Rachel Carson, how this came to be. But these aren’t just performances. They’re a chance to step into Living History – to ask questions and go one on one with a women whose books shaped our country and our…See More
Mar 7
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted blog posts
Mar 7
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lexie on deck_edited-1

"She looks like I look in my imagination right before I've had my coffee ... relaxed, bothered (by something, anything) and fully aware that I'm almost, but not quite, the center of the universe ... a feeling that quickly fades after that…"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford replied to Kathryn Stripling Byer's discussion Mary Adams's new chapbook COMMANDMENT
"This is so perfect ... the thought of every woman, who KNOWS what the men are thinking!  But now at least we have an idea! This makes me happy in a sad, lovely sort of way!"
Mar 4
Lynn Hamilton-Rutherford posted a photo

Mom in Her Writing Nook ...

She was working on the "About the Authors" section of "Echoes Across the Blue Ridge" when I captured this one morning. Though you can't see it, her coffee cup was within gentle reach that morning. Roxie is at her feet.
Mar 4

Annual commemoration on Botanical Gardens site inspires continual research

See also the historical insights of Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps.


The Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps commemorates the April 6, 1865 Civil War battle at the site--now Sycamore Meadow, UNCA Botanical Gardens, and surrounding area--2 to 4 p.m., April 3. The event features military services and an address by former Asheville mayor Charles Worley.

Was it a battle—or a skirmish, as the state and some historians deem? The question probes a living understanding of what really had gone on 145 years ago when the 101st Ohio Infantry and other Federal troops tested the mettle of the local home guard, some troops, convalescent soldiers, and others..

One of the issues is, “How could the two sides have exchanged fire all day yet have counted only a handful of casualties?” Peter Lorenz, Field and Staff Officer for the Corps, explains that the answer has to do with terrain and armaments.

The woods had been thick, the few hundred members of Asheville’s Confederate militia well-placed uphill, and the several hundred Federal troops able to get under the trajectory of the locals’ cannons.

“Poor quality fuses, inferior powder, and insufficient proper ammunition further hampered the usually crack shot artillery's efforts,” Lorenz adds. “Earlier in the war, after the Battle of Chancellorsville,” he notes, “a Confederate artilleryman commented that of every fifteen rounds of (exploding) shot fired, only one burst.”

Loremz compares the battle to the 1862 Battle of Hampton Roads, in which the Union and Confederate battleships Monitor and Merrimac (CSS Virginia) fired at each other for four hours with only one casualty. In any case, Asheville’s engagement represented the Union’s focus on Asheville as one of the last strongholds of the war.

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From the journal of Cornelia Henry, April 6-7, 1865:

Thursday 6th - Mr. Henry went to town this morning. About three o'clock we heard the yankees were in town but did not believe it till about four when George came up from the mill and said some men had come from town & said it was certainly so. Matt & I began to fix up things. Sam came and said Mr. Henry had gone on to the front and sent me word by Mrs. Owensby not to be alarmed. Sam took charge of the bacon. I am very uneasy about Mr. Henry.

Some soldiers (four) stay here tonight. I think they had better go on to Asheville. May a kind Heaven protect my dear husband this night and all our brave men and turn back our enemies. Oh! Lord, deliver us from our enemies I pray.

Friday 7th - Mr. Henry came home about eleven o'clock. I was so glad to see him. Matt & I were still up. I felt so distressed I could not sleep if I had gone to bed. Mr. Henry said we repulsed them handsomely. I am very glad of it. He thinks they will fight again today. It nearly killed me this morning to tell him good bye. He went to town this morning and came back about 12 o'clock and says the yankees left last night. I am so thankful. I believe the Lord heard my hearty felt prayer.

They took some prisoners at Rankin’s tan yard, some four or five. We had two men slightly wounded. We do not know the enemies’ loss as they were some six hundred yards apart, they left one leg in a boot. Our men acted well. The artillery played on them all the time. The negroes here heard it but I was upstairs when Matt was weaving so could not hear it. They fought down about Nick Woodfin’s farm. I do hope they may never come back again. The soldiers that staid here last night did not go towards Asheville this morning but up the river. I think they wanted to get away from the fight.

Mr. Henry woke up those soldiers after he came to know who they were. They said they belonged to Capt. Deaver’s company. We went to bed about 12 o'clock but Mr. Henry got uneasy so we got up and he went up & woke them up and they all went out to sleep. The first night Mr. Henry has ever slept out and I hope tis the last he will ever have to leave his nice warm bed.

The yankees killed one of N. W. Woodfin’s negroes for running. Old Sam don't believe the yankees would do anything wrong. I hope they may never get here to convince him. I am afraid they will give us a call sometime but I hope and pray not. Oh! Lord deliver us from our enemies I pray.

The 4-5 prisoners taken at the tanyard were colored union soldiers under Gen. Davis Tillson.  They were drum-court-martialed for assaulting an old man and woman and raping a young white woman who was the niece of the couple down near Flat Creek.  Only one of the soldiers was identified by the Uncle and that man gave up the names of four others who participated.  The four were shot under Gen. TIllson's orders and the man who gave up the names was executed the following morning.  One could see the graves opposite the old tannery on Main St as the drovers came into town.  In 1907 the forgotten skeletons of the men were found when they widened the road and they were re-interred elsewhere, some speculate to Gallows Hill which was just behind the area they were found as some graves have been found on the UNC-A property that one was Woodfin's Farm and across from the farm was Gallows Hill where a few executions took place previous to the the old city jail & gallows being builtdowntown around the turn of the century.  

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