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Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25.

East Asheville history and sites

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Feb 27.

The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

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Lyndsay Eli with GUNSLINGER GIRL (YA Novel) at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

January 20, 2018 from 6pm to 7pm
Are you a fan of The Hunger Games?  Then picture what Katniss would be like - with a gun.  That's just a taste of the "new" West action Lyndsay Eli brings to Spellbound Children's Bookshop with Gunslinger Girl.  She shares her debut novel on Saturday, January 20, at 6 p.m. The US has been fractured by a Second Civil War. Serendipity 'Pity' Jones finds a home of sorts in the corrupt, lawless city of Cessation (think Las Vegas on steroids).  Her shooting skills make her a star of the Theater…See More
19 hours ago
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Cherokee and WNC music and dance events

Two Big Cultural Events in December in Hendersonville & Ashevillefrom press releaseThe Center for Cultural Preservation, WNC’s cultural history and documentary film center, presents, Cherokee Music and Dance on Thursday, December 7, 7 p.m., Blue Ridge Community College’s Thomas Auditorium.  Tickets are $5. The screening of A Great American Tapestry will be held on December 2, 2 p.m., at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Reuter Center, UNC Asheville.  Tickets for that event are…See More
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Spellbound posted events
Nov 9
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Battery Park Hill through the ages

Battery Park through the Years by Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTIONS: 1) Present-day view of Battery Park Apartments from…See More
Nov 6
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post
Oct 13
Rob Neufeld's discussion was featured

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Dave Minneman and a sense of justiceby Rob NeufeldPHOTO CAPTION: Dave Minneman doing research at Pack Memorial Library.  Photo by author.            “One of the biggest things I did as a kid, in order to escape my father,” Asheville resident Dave Minneman says of his 1960s and 70s rural Indiana childhood, “was…See More
Oct 8
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at MACA Authors' Booth

October 14, 2017 from 9:30am to 1:30pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be signing her new books A Part of Me and A Place That Was Home at the Mountain Glory Festival in downtown Marion on Saturday, October 14, from 9:30-1:30. She will be located at the MACA Authors' booth on Main Street.See More
Oct 7
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Sample 8 Great Smokies Writers at Malaprop’s, Oct. 15

Writers in UNC Asheville’s Great Smokies Writing Program (GSWP)read atMalaprop's Bookstore/Café, 55 Haywood St., Asheville, 3 p.m., Sun.,Oct. 15 Elizabeth Lutyens, editor of the GSWP’s Great Smokies Review, leads the Prose Master Class and will host the reading. ·        Ellen Carr, who works in the financial industry, will read excerpts from her novel of uneasy relationships, Unmanned. ·        Sarah Carter, an artist and photographer who will publish an excerpt of her novel, Jolene, Joe-Pye,…See More
Oct 6
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

The Douglas Ellington effect: An Appreciationby Rob NeufeldIMAGE: Douglas Ellington’s original drawing for a City Hall-County Courthouse Art Deco complex.            “Dear Douglas,” Kenneth Ellington wrote his brother, the 38-year old Pittsburgh architect, on May 6, 1925, “I know things are…See More
Oct 6
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

How To Kill Your Reader

Danger is a crucial element in a mystery novel. A killer is on the loose and no one is safe. But sometimes the killer can be the writer, and the victim, the reader.I'm talking about when the author turns into a preacher and the story becomes a sermon. Now I am not against using a mystery novel for social commentary. Writing doesn't happen in a moral vacuum, and, after all, isn't a mystery a morality play? As fellow North Carolina author Margaret Maron said there is no topic that can't be dealt…See More
Oct 5
Mark de Castrique posted a video

Hidden Scars - A Sam Blackman Mystery

Sam Blackman and Nakayla Robertson investigate a 70-year-old death that unleashes a killer.
Oct 3
Mark de Castrique posted a discussion

Black Mountain College as Backdrop for Mystery

My new book, HIDDEN SCARS, is released Oct 3rd.  D.G. Martin notes the star of the story is Black Mountain College.  http://chapelboro.com/town-square/columns/one-on-one/one-one-lost-college-still-shinesSee More
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Upcoming book--Sacred Sites for Secular Times

Sacred Sites for Secular Times: 50 Commemorative Experiences in Western North Carolina by Rob Neufeld              Among the many sites dedicated to history, there are some—both overbooked and overlooked—that provide full and moving experiences.  They involve a physical component, connecting to landscape; an imaginative one, entering other times and minds; and an interactive one, maintaining relevance.             The entries in this book help create full experiences through descriptive…See More
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Susan Weinberg shared their event on Facebook
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Annual commemoration on Botanical Gardens site inspires continual research

See also the historical insights of Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps.


The Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps commemorates the April 6, 1865 Civil War battle at the site--now Sycamore Meadow, UNCA Botanical Gardens, and surrounding area--2 to 4 p.m., April 3. The event features military services and an address by former Asheville mayor Charles Worley.

Was it a battle—or a skirmish, as the state and some historians deem? The question probes a living understanding of what really had gone on 145 years ago when the 101st Ohio Infantry and other Federal troops tested the mettle of the local home guard, some troops, convalescent soldiers, and others..

One of the issues is, “How could the two sides have exchanged fire all day yet have counted only a handful of casualties?” Peter Lorenz, Field and Staff Officer for the Corps, explains that the answer has to do with terrain and armaments.

The woods had been thick, the few hundred members of Asheville’s Confederate militia well-placed uphill, and the several hundred Federal troops able to get under the trajectory of the locals’ cannons.

“Poor quality fuses, inferior powder, and insufficient proper ammunition further hampered the usually crack shot artillery's efforts,” Lorenz adds. “Earlier in the war, after the Battle of Chancellorsville,” he notes, “a Confederate artilleryman commented that of every fifteen rounds of (exploding) shot fired, only one burst.”

Loremz compares the battle to the 1862 Battle of Hampton Roads, in which the Union and Confederate battleships Monitor and Merrimac (CSS Virginia) fired at each other for four hours with only one casualty. In any case, Asheville’s engagement represented the Union’s focus on Asheville as one of the last strongholds of the war.

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From the journal of Cornelia Henry, April 6-7, 1865:

Thursday 6th - Mr. Henry went to town this morning. About three o'clock we heard the yankees were in town but did not believe it till about four when George came up from the mill and said some men had come from town & said it was certainly so. Matt & I began to fix up things. Sam came and said Mr. Henry had gone on to the front and sent me word by Mrs. Owensby not to be alarmed. Sam took charge of the bacon. I am very uneasy about Mr. Henry.

Some soldiers (four) stay here tonight. I think they had better go on to Asheville. May a kind Heaven protect my dear husband this night and all our brave men and turn back our enemies. Oh! Lord, deliver us from our enemies I pray.

Friday 7th - Mr. Henry came home about eleven o'clock. I was so glad to see him. Matt & I were still up. I felt so distressed I could not sleep if I had gone to bed. Mr. Henry said we repulsed them handsomely. I am very glad of it. He thinks they will fight again today. It nearly killed me this morning to tell him good bye. He went to town this morning and came back about 12 o'clock and says the yankees left last night. I am so thankful. I believe the Lord heard my hearty felt prayer.

They took some prisoners at Rankin’s tan yard, some four or five. We had two men slightly wounded. We do not know the enemies’ loss as they were some six hundred yards apart, they left one leg in a boot. Our men acted well. The artillery played on them all the time. The negroes here heard it but I was upstairs when Matt was weaving so could not hear it. They fought down about Nick Woodfin’s farm. I do hope they may never come back again. The soldiers that staid here last night did not go towards Asheville this morning but up the river. I think they wanted to get away from the fight.

Mr. Henry woke up those soldiers after he came to know who they were. They said they belonged to Capt. Deaver’s company. We went to bed about 12 o'clock but Mr. Henry got uneasy so we got up and he went up & woke them up and they all went out to sleep. The first night Mr. Henry has ever slept out and I hope tis the last he will ever have to leave his nice warm bed.

The yankees killed one of N. W. Woodfin’s negroes for running. Old Sam don't believe the yankees would do anything wrong. I hope they may never get here to convince him. I am afraid they will give us a call sometime but I hope and pray not. Oh! Lord deliver us from our enemies I pray.

The 4-5 prisoners taken at the tanyard were colored union soldiers under Gen. Davis Tillson.  They were drum-court-martialed for assaulting an old man and woman and raping a young white woman who was the niece of the couple down near Flat Creek.  Only one of the soldiers was identified by the Uncle and that man gave up the names of four others who participated.  The four were shot under Gen. TIllson's orders and the man who gave up the names was executed the following morning.  One could see the graves opposite the old tannery on Main St as the drovers came into town.  In 1907 the forgotten skeletons of the men were found when they widened the road and they were re-interred elsewhere, some speculate to Gallows Hill which was just behind the area they were found as some graves have been found on the UNC-A property that one was Woodfin's Farm and across from the farm was Gallows Hill where a few executions took place previous to the the old city jail & gallows being builtdowntown around the turn of the century.  

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