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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Gail Godwin full interview for Grief Cottage event

Gail Godwin talks about Grief Cottage            Asheville author Gail Godwin, now a Woodstock, NY resident, comes back home here Wed., June 14 to present her new novel, “Grief Cottage” at Malaprop’s Bookstore, 7 p.m.             “Grief Cottage” is the story of an orphaned, sensitive, troubled boy, named…See More
Jun 13
Jack J. Prather posted a blog post

First Woman NC Poet Laureate's Biography

A Biography of Late NC Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byerin Hendersonville Author's Six Notable Women of North CarolinaA biography of the late Kathryn Stripling "Kay" Byer of Cullowhee, the first woman and longest-serving (2005-2009) Poet Laureate in the state, is featured in Six Notable Women of North Carolina by Jack J. Prather of Hendersonville, founder of the Young Writers Scholarship at Warren Wilson College. The 43-page biography includes poems selected by the poet who passed away on…See More
Jun 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Community Building

June 17, 2017 from 10am to 3pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be a featured author at the McDowell County 2017 Local Author Festival at the Marion Community Building in downtown Marion on Saturday, June 17 from 10-3. The event is sponsored by the McDowell County Public Library and is free and open to the public.See More
Jun 6
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Mom's has-been groove in ghost-boy novel

Marcus, in Gail Godwin’s new novel, Grief Cottage, recalls his friendship with Wheezer, whom he’d once beaten up at school because Wheezer had exposed Marcus’ shameful secret about his mom.  Now Marcus, age 10, is an orphan.  His dad has always been unknown to him; and his mom has just died in a car accident. Relocated to his aunt’s beach house, Marcus, despite the safety of the place, finds himself in trouble. He’s communicating with a ghost.  He’s having dreams about a non-existent older…See More
Jun 3
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jun 1
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness at City Lights Bookstore

July 28, 2017 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Linda Star Wolf will visit City Lights Bookstore on Friday, July 28th at 6:30 p.m. She will present her new book, Soul Whispering: The Art of Awakening Shamanic Consciousness.  Master Shamanic Breathwork Practitioner, Nita Gage co-wrote the book with Linda Star Wolf. The authors explore how the art of Soul Whispering can help each of us understand why we experience our lives the way we do and shift from healing our wounds to embracing the process of transformation. This is a powerful new…See More
May 27
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
May 23
Mirra updated an event
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Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 20
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6
Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps contributes the following notes on the battle.

The 101st Ohio was present on 06 April 1865, along with other Ohio troops, Indiana troops and Illinois troops. On the Confederate side, remnants of the 62nd NCT, 64th NCT, Macbeth (South Carolina) Light Artillery, "Silver Grays", (our Home Guard), Teague's Scouts and some of the convalescent soldiers from the Confederate Hospital in Asheville. A few civilians would have been present as well.

As for the significance of the battle, which is the correct designation due to the simple fact that battles are fought with two opposing forces in defensive and offensive positions. Battles are not of short duration and they were meant to take place. Skirmishes are of brief duration and always occur when two opposing forces don't plan on running into each other. It usually occurs by accident and is much more mobile.

Perhaps the text of my speech from the ceremony [April 3, 2010, Sycamore Meadow, the Botanical Gardens at Asheville] will establish stronger results as to the significance of defending Asheville.

"...Why was the battle important for the town of Asheville?"

"North Carolina gave a record number (125,000) of her sons to the Confederacy. This number represented more North Carolinians than the voting population for the entire state. By the end of the war, 19,673 North Carolinians were killed in battle and 20,602 died of disease; a total loss of 40,275, which surpassed any other state in the Confederate States of America."

"A few training camps and fortifications were placed around the town of Asheville, but at no time was the town prepared for a full-scale assault by the enemy."

"Asheville had escaped most of the horrors of the war, but the Union Army did not overlook Asheville. The Yankees hated this town and its people vigorously! Enfield rifles had been built here at the Asheville Armory which the Federals did not fail to bear in mind. Asheville was the heart of Confederate sentiment in the South, so her fate would be exceedingly harsh and unpleasant."

"...In terms of importance, what would have happened if Asheville had been left completely unprotected?"

"Most certainly the town would have been plundered, pillaged, and burned. Our old men and young boys would have been locked away in town. Our ladies would have been subjected to every sort of drunken Union soldier and criminal in the state, for the bushwhackers and thieves thrived on robbing and terrorizing the defenseless women. The women of Asheville would have had all their valuables taken from them, even the family heirlooms that had been hidden under their dresses. In most cases, the women would have been insulted, harassed, beaten and perhaps even raped. The meager amount of food that Asheville possessed could have been taken by just a few soldiers, which would leave the citizens of Asheville with no means to replace the food and supplies, which would leave the townspeople indefinitely famished. Our people grew and preserved everything they ate, so when the pantry was bare it meant families were going to go to bed hungry. Any livestock that was found by the Yankees would be confiscated immediately. Anything that could not be used by the invaders would have been destroyed."

"The residents of Asheville knew what would happen if Col. Kirk and his band of raiders captured the town; Asheville would have been reduced to ashes."

"If we prevent the Union troops from entering the town, then we would not be robbed and the citizens of Asheville and their homes and families would be safe. This would also provide safe haven for Gen. Martin and his few troops, whom we needed for our protection."

"Why was it important then?"

It allowed us to keep our town, our homes and our freedom longer. It is part of the colorful history of Asheville and the surrounding area; this is our precious heritage.

Finally, it boosted the morale of the townspeople. There were no more than 400 Confederates present, against a Federal force of about 1,000 troops.

The comparison between the Monitor and the Merrimac (CSS Virginia) [at the Battle of Hampton Roads] is a good one to use. In four hours of combat, only one casualty occurred on the Federal side; the commander of the Monitor was temporarily blinded.

The low number of casualties [at the Battle of Asheville] can easily be explained by the distance between the forces; the dense trees and undergrowth; the Federals firing uphill into a well entrenched position held by the Confederates; headlogs, split rail fences and other obstacles only allowed firing at "targets of opportunity." It is apparent that Col. Kirby did not wish to engage in an all out assault without his artillery, so far away from his base. Another fact would be that he was not eager to fight a determined Confederate force so late in the war.

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