Affiliated Networks


Forum

Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Tale of Ononis

The Tale of Ononis by Rob Neufeld Part 1: The Making of a Celebrity ❧  Hare Begins His Tale  Ononis was my region’s name.People now call it Never-the-same.I’ll start with the day a delivery came. The package I got was a devil’s dare,Swaddled and knotted in Swamp Bloat hairAnd bearing, in red, one word: “Beware!” Bloats are creatures from the Land of Mud Pies,Wallowing in waste with tightly closed eyesUntil fears bring tears and the bleary bloats rise.   ❧  Hare’s Colleagues  I asked my boss,…See More
Friday
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Drop Your Troubles: A Solo Storytelling Performance with Connie Regan-Blake at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

December 1, 2018 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join this internationally renowned storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she transforms a packed theater into an intimate circle of friends with old-timey charm, wisdom, and humor. We’ll also welcome the Singer of  Stories, Donna Marie Todd, who will perform her original story, “The Amazing Zicafoose Sisters.” Connie’s last two shows at BMCA have sold…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
Thumbnail

Explore the Landscapes of Story and Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Nov 6
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
Thumbnail

Explore the Landscapes of Story & Telling at Lenoir-Rhyne Center for Graduate Studies

January 23, 2019 at 10am to February 27, 2019 at 12pm
A Storytelling Offering in Asheville, NCWednesday Mornings 10am-12pmJanuary 23 – February 27, 2019 This winter Connie is excited to offer a learning opportunity to warm-up your storytelling voice and creativity!  Join her in Asheville, NC at Lenoir-Rhyne University for six story-work sessions with a weekly format that allows for skills to grow over time while encouraging a consistency in discovering, revisiting and refining your stories. During these weekly sessions participants are invited…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
Thumbnail

Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” The event will be hosted by the Black Mountain Center for the Arts, just a short drive from Asheville nestled in the picturesque mountains surrounding the area. Call the Center for advance tickets (828) 669-0930 or order…See More
Oct 28
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
Thumbnail

Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive, affirming…See More
Oct 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Let’s say every word is precious

Let’s say every word is precious (Part of Living Poem) Let’s say every word is precious.Say every word is precious.Every word is precious.Every word precious.Every word.Word.--Rob Neufeld, Oct. 16, 2018See More
Oct 17
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Oct 12
Nancy Sutton replied to Rob Neufeld's discussion Metamorphoses
"Poignant in so many ways!   "
Oct 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Metamorphoses

Metamorphoses (Part of Living Poem)Hear audio: Metamorphoses%20181004_0192.MP3 So Apollo committed the first rape.He’d come back from exterminating Python,The Bane of Humanity, now his arrow-victim,And stopped to mock…See More
Oct 2
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Fantastic, that will be very helpful."
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

First Drumbeat

First Drumbeat(Part of Living Poem) The time has come.Call it a drum,Or a crumb,What’s left of life. I used to tell a jokeWhen my life was wide,And I was a stud,And not a dud—I knowI’m not a dud.  I’m a dude,A dad.  But everyone mustRebut the dud chargeAt summing up time. Oh yeah, the joke,A trademark one for meIn that it’s not funny. I used to say I’ll never retireFrom writingBecause if I’m ever…See More
Sep 22
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Thanks for the prompt, Joan!  I have attached the whole work in progress as a doc at the bottom of the table of contents page: http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/special/living-poem"
Sep 22
Joan Henehan replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"Is there a way from this website to print everything or might you send me such a document to bayjh@icloud.com?"
Sep 22
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event
Thumbnail

Julia Nunnally Duncan at Marion Branch McDowell County Public Library

October 24, 2018 from 4pm to 5pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will be launching her new poetry collection A Neighborhood Changes (Finishing Line Press, 2018) at a book presentation and signing to be held at the McDowell County Public Library in Marion on October 24.See More
Sep 21
Rob Neufeld replied to Joan Henehan's discussion on Reading Living Poem
"This could be interesting--thanks!  I'm at 828-505-1973 (my home business office).  And RNeufeld@charter.net."
Sep 20
Col. J. H. Lovelace, Founder, Senior Field and Staff Officer and event organizer of the Battle of Asheville Commemorative Corps contributes the following notes on the battle.

The 101st Ohio was present on 06 April 1865, along with other Ohio troops, Indiana troops and Illinois troops. On the Confederate side, remnants of the 62nd NCT, 64th NCT, Macbeth (South Carolina) Light Artillery, "Silver Grays", (our Home Guard), Teague's Scouts and some of the convalescent soldiers from the Confederate Hospital in Asheville. A few civilians would have been present as well.

As for the significance of the battle, which is the correct designation due to the simple fact that battles are fought with two opposing forces in defensive and offensive positions. Battles are not of short duration and they were meant to take place. Skirmishes are of brief duration and always occur when two opposing forces don't plan on running into each other. It usually occurs by accident and is much more mobile.

Perhaps the text of my speech from the ceremony [April 3, 2010, Sycamore Meadow, the Botanical Gardens at Asheville] will establish stronger results as to the significance of defending Asheville.

"...Why was the battle important for the town of Asheville?"

"North Carolina gave a record number (125,000) of her sons to the Confederacy. This number represented more North Carolinians than the voting population for the entire state. By the end of the war, 19,673 North Carolinians were killed in battle and 20,602 died of disease; a total loss of 40,275, which surpassed any other state in the Confederate States of America."

"A few training camps and fortifications were placed around the town of Asheville, but at no time was the town prepared for a full-scale assault by the enemy."

"Asheville had escaped most of the horrors of the war, but the Union Army did not overlook Asheville. The Yankees hated this town and its people vigorously! Enfield rifles had been built here at the Asheville Armory which the Federals did not fail to bear in mind. Asheville was the heart of Confederate sentiment in the South, so her fate would be exceedingly harsh and unpleasant."

"...In terms of importance, what would have happened if Asheville had been left completely unprotected?"

"Most certainly the town would have been plundered, pillaged, and burned. Our old men and young boys would have been locked away in town. Our ladies would have been subjected to every sort of drunken Union soldier and criminal in the state, for the bushwhackers and thieves thrived on robbing and terrorizing the defenseless women. The women of Asheville would have had all their valuables taken from them, even the family heirlooms that had been hidden under their dresses. In most cases, the women would have been insulted, harassed, beaten and perhaps even raped. The meager amount of food that Asheville possessed could have been taken by just a few soldiers, which would leave the citizens of Asheville with no means to replace the food and supplies, which would leave the townspeople indefinitely famished. Our people grew and preserved everything they ate, so when the pantry was bare it meant families were going to go to bed hungry. Any livestock that was found by the Yankees would be confiscated immediately. Anything that could not be used by the invaders would have been destroyed."

"The residents of Asheville knew what would happen if Col. Kirk and his band of raiders captured the town; Asheville would have been reduced to ashes."

"If we prevent the Union troops from entering the town, then we would not be robbed and the citizens of Asheville and their homes and families would be safe. This would also provide safe haven for Gen. Martin and his few troops, whom we needed for our protection."

"Why was it important then?"

It allowed us to keep our town, our homes and our freedom longer. It is part of the colorful history of Asheville and the surrounding area; this is our precious heritage.

Finally, it boosted the morale of the townspeople. There were no more than 400 Confederates present, against a Federal force of about 1,000 troops.

The comparison between the Monitor and the Merrimac (CSS Virginia) [at the Battle of Hampton Roads] is a good one to use. In four hours of combat, only one casualty occurred on the Federal side; the commander of the Monitor was temporarily blinded.

The low number of casualties [at the Battle of Asheville] can easily be explained by the distance between the forces; the dense trees and undergrowth; the Federals firing uphill into a well entrenched position held by the Confederates; headlogs, split rail fences and other obstacles only allowed firing at "targets of opportunity." It is apparent that Col. Kirby did not wish to engage in an all out assault without his artillery, so far away from his base. Another fact would be that he was not eager to fight a determined Confederate force so late in the war.

Views: 263

Reply to This

© 2018   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

UA-124288772-1