Affiliated Networks


Badge

Loading…

Latest Activity

City Lights Bookstore posted events
23 hours ago
Dave Turner shared their blog post on Facebook
yesterday
Dave Turner posted a blog post

Billy Ray's Chevrolet and Other Writings and Photographs from a Southern Appalachian Valley

Thought of this little piece from my eBook today:Brittle sticks and dry leaves on the ground crunch beneath my feet.The day is crisp and cold.The sky is white and the sunlight is dreamlike, filtered by thin clouds and casting a surreal glow.A sharp north wind gusts and swishes through bare branches and across frozen ground powdered with new snow.Ancient mountains rise with leafless trees revealing the tops of ridges you can’t see in summer, just as they did during the winters of my…See More
yesterday
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Tuesday
Spellbound posted an event
Thumbnail

Descriptive Writing Workshop (Grades 6-8) at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

January 9, 2015 from 6pm to 7:30pm
In 2015, Spellbound is rolling out a new Young Writers Series of workshops. Throughout the year, professional writers, editors, and educators will offer classes on a variety of topics for budding authors. We’re kicking off the series in January with Descriptive Writing for Grades 6-8, a writing workshop based on activities from the Writers in Training book.  This fun and interactive session is presented by Susan Joyner, an educator for over two decades. Using visual aids created by the…See More
Monday
Julia Nunnally Duncan updated their profile
Dec 10
Jerald Pope posted an event

Holiday Book Sale at Monte Vista Hotel

December 11, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Remember that precious book you received when you were a child? That worn out, scribbled-in book you still have somewhere? Looking for the perfect last-minute gift?  This Christmas, you can give a child or an adult that precious gift. The Black Mountain Authors Guild will present the second annual Holiday Book Sale at the Monte Vista Hotel on Thursday, December 11, from 6 until 7.  All books are written by local authors and cover genres from children’s picture books to memoirs to historical…See More
Dec 9
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan Book Signing at MACA Building

December 12, 2014 from 5pm to 7pm
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her books at the McDowell Arts Council Association's Holiday Event on Friday, December 12, from 5-7 p.m. Held in MACA's gallery and gift shop, the event is open to the public and refreshments will be served.See More
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Fundraiser ( Poem )

Fundraiser ( Poem) Best Christmas idea fundraiser Send donation request letters A festival of trees to raffle You’ll get more then a tree of raddles Companie...
Dec 9
Doris Anne Beaulieu posted a video

Christmas Parade ( Part-7 )

From human reindeer pulling to an amazing Mr.& Mrs.Santa Clause on the sleigh float.
Dec 4
Christine Lajewski posted a blog post

Tribute to Ashley

One of my closest friends, Rachelle, lost her daughter to a canoeing accident on a frigid November night in 2005.  I wrote a poem as a tribute to Ashley, which was later published in Deep Waters, the Tall Grass Writers' Guild 2012 anthology.  As we approach the 9th anniversary of the loss of this lovely young woman, I have posted the poem in my blog at Christine-lajewski.squarespace.com I think any "likes" would be appreciated by Rachelle.  Thank you for reading it.See More
Nov 22
Lockie Hunter posted an event
Thumbnail

West End Poetry and Prose reading series: November edition at West End Bakery

November 22, 2014 from 7pm to 9pm
Join us for the 3rd in the West End reading series. This month we have 5 wonderful local authors. This is a marvelous Free family-friendly evening of prose, poetry, and storytelling featuring some of your favorite local Asheville writers. November's lineup includes:Allan Wolf Katey Schultz Matthew Olzmann Melissa Crowe Alli Marshallhosted by Lockie HunterSee More
Nov 20
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Ellison's new look at Kephart in Our Southern Highlanders, 3d edition

Ellison retells Kephart and broadens a legacyby Rob Neufeld             One of the most influential people in our region’s history—Horace Kephart, the controversial and fascinating genius of the Great Smokies—has warranted a new consideration by George Ellison, a long-time scholar of Kephart’s life and…See More
Nov 18
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Nov 15
Spellbound posted an event
Thumbnail

December ROYAL Book Club: Sabriel at Spellbound Children's Bookshop

December 7, 2014 from 4pm to 5pm
ROYAL is Spellbound’s monthly book club for adult Readers of Young Adult Literature. We meet the first Sunday of each month at 4:00PM. Anyone over 18 is welcome, no RSVP necessary. Book club selections are always 20% off until the day of the meeting.See More
Nov 15
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
Thumbnail

Tangible Evidence of Jesus at City Lights Bookstore

December 7, 2014 from 2pm to 3pm
Sylva author, Mary Joyce will present her book Tangible Evidence of Jesus on Sunday, December 7th at 2 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore. Tangible Evidence of Jesus was written after the Joyce plodded through much archaeological evidence and academic research. It is intended to be a bridge between scholarly researchers and most of the rest of us. It also was written for those who would like proof of Jesus beyond what is written in Christian Bibles. The writing style deliberately is condensed and to…See More
Nov 15

ASU name expert, Dr. Donna Lillian, reveals fruits of study

Words with friends; Appalachian professor leads American Name Society

Article from Appalachian State University

BOONE—Onomastics. It’s a word a computer spellchecker won’t recognize but one that speaks volumes to those who study names and naming practices.

Dr. Donna L. Lillian, director of the women’s studies program at Appalachian State University and an associate professor of English, is an onomastician and has begun a two-year term as president of the American Name Society (ANS), the oldest scholarly society devoted to the study of names in the United States. She took office earlier this month during the society’s annual meeting held in Boston in conjunction with the Linguistic Society of America.

“Names have a lot to do with identity,” Lillian said. “So if we want to know who we are, then one way of exploring that is what we call ourselves, all the things we do and interact with.”

Onomastics also encompasses a range of academic areas of interest, Lillian explained. For example, areas of interest to researchers include names in politics, religion and literature. Society members who are geographers study names of cities, towns, streets, mountains or rivers.

“If you look at the place names of North America, you can learn a lot about history, migration patterns and values,” Lillian said. “Scholars of literature will often study names in favorite pieces of literature or those used by certain authors, such as Dickens who did interesting things with his characters’ names,” Lillian said.

Dickens’ colorful and character-defining include Mr. Sloppy, Artful Dodger and of course, Scrooge. Others study trade names.

“Trends in name choices for children can say something about what we as a society are preoccupied with,” Lillian said. “If a particular individual such as an athlete, actor or politician gains quite a bit of popularity, then a lot of people start naming their child after that person. Historically you can look back and see what were some of those preoccupations.” 

Each year during its annual meeting, the American Name Society votes on the preceding year’s top personal name, place name, trade name and fictional name.  Winners were Malala, Gangman, fiscal cliff and Downton Abbey, respectively.  Malala was selected because the name has become associated with a cause – advocating for education of Pakistani girls, particularly in an area controlled by the Taliban.

The society’s overall name of the year was Sandy for its association with Hurricane Sandy and Sandy Hook Elementary School, Lillian said.

Lillian’s interest in names was fueled while teaching a language and gender course while a master’s degree candidate at the University of Toronto. “I began thinking about women’s marital name choices, our naming practices in general and how the family surname is virtually always the father’s surname,” she said. “For my master’s thesis, I did an empirical study on patterns of women’s naming choices and the courtesy title Ms.”

She has continued her research on women’s use of surnames when they marry and their use of the courtesy titles Miss, Ms. or Mrs. and how those trends have changed during the past 30 years.

“There have been some interesting shifts,” Lillian said. “In the mid-80s, there was a growing trend toward women keeping their surname when they married. Professional women and younger women were more likely to keep their name. Women who had married before the mid-70s changed their name.”

That trend began changing in the mid-90s. “The trend is reversing itself now among younger women. Fewer women under 30 are keeping their name when they marry,” Lillian said. Some of the women Lillian surveyed recounted the hassles their mother encountered by keeping her surname and didn’t want a similar experience. “There was also a big connection with a return to conservative values including a family all having the same surname.”

When it comes to the use of Ms., the trends are also interesting. Originally used to eliminate the distinction between Miss and Mrs., Lillian said that by the 1980s many people had a negative association with Ms., equating it with feminism or radical overtones, or a title used by divorced women.

“By 2006, people assumed it was a third title, not associated with feminism, and they are surprised to learn it was meant to replace Miss or Mrs. The women I surveyed thought it was a handy third term to indicate someone who is separated or divorced or to use as a placeholder if you don’t know their marital status. It has undergone quite a shift.”

Lillian recently has been researching the various names of the 750 college and university women’s studies programs in the U.S., any changes that have occurred over the years and why. “Within my field now, that’s a big topic of discussion,” she said.  Program names range from women’s studies to gender studies or gender and sexuality studies.

In addition to her duties as president of the American Name Society, Lillian, with the help of Dr. Cheryl Claassen from Appalachian’s Department of Anthropology,
hopes to revive the Blue Ridge Names Society and hold a conference in the fall.

Views: 117

Reply to This

© 2014   Created by Rob Neufeld.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service