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The German experience settling WNC 1 Reply

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History. Last reply by Scott Dockery Feb 16.

The history of Oakley

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History May 13, 2016.

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Connie Regan-Blake posted events
yesterday
Mirra updated an event
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Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
Saturday
Mirra posted an event

Dada Maheshvarananda Launches Cooperative Games book at Malaprops Bookstore

May 27, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
With a Foreword by noted author and activist, Bill Ayers, Cooperative Games for a Cooperative World by Dada Maheshvarananda, shows up how to work together to create unity, trust, and cooperation in making the small and big changes needed to create the world we want to see.Listen to this recent radio interview with Dada:https://drive.google.com/openDiane Donovan of Midwest Books says of…See More
May 16
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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Rosalind Bunn Storytime at City Lights Bookstore

June 24, 2017 from 11am to 12pm
Rosalind Bunn will return to City Lights Bookstore on Saturday, June 24th at 11 a.m. for a special storytime. Rosalind teaches at East Side Elementary in Marietta, Georgia. She has three grown children and a new grandson. Rosalind has co-authored three children's books with a dear friend, Kathleen Howard. Her newest book, Thunder & a Lightning Bug Named Lou, is illustrated by Angela C. Hawkins and was released in December 2016. Her other titles are Whose Shadow Do I See?, The Monsters…See More
May 13
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

I Have a Coin

I Have a Coin I have a coin I deem a treasure.One side bears the sign of extinction,And the other, an instance of nature.But it’s not a coin; it’s a seal,And the meaning of this distinctionIs the unbearable sadness I feelWith experience, or with closure. It seems like a double exposure,But the knowledge of impermanenceBleeds into the ideal likenessOf mortality in its eminence—To yield a vibrant pictureOf a creature’s essential brightnessAs it burns for life without censure. --Rob NeufeldSee More
May 12
City Lights Bookstore posted events
May 11
Gary Thomas Johnson is attending Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Gary Thomas Johnson shared Kalen Vaughan Johnson's event on Facebook
May 10
Kalen Vaughan Johnson posted an event
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Kalen Vaughan Johnson debuts ROBBING THE PILLARS at Malaprop's Bookstore/Cafe

May 20, 2017 from 7pm to 8:30pm
This signing event for my debut novel ROBBING THE PILLARS will also serve as a benefit for longtime family friend and WNC advocate for people with disabilitiesSee More
May 10
Mark de Castrique posted a blog post

Hidden Scars - Sam Blackman and Black Mountain College

I don't know if this is true for my fellow writers, but proofing can be the most difficult part of the process.  I received the ARC today for October's Sam Blackman Mystery and will begin the last review for typos or formatting errors that have eluded my editor, my copy editor, and myself.  Amazing that there is always something that the brain "fixes" and we don't see.Hope springs eternal that the October release will be typo-free.  The mystery is set against the historic backdrop of Black…See More
May 6
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

How to make a monument Waynesville style

For a monument in a parking lotHow might an artist portray a Plott?The Forga family owns the only downtown parking lot in Hazelwood and wants a statue of a Plott Hound, the N.C. State Dog, put at its center in honor of the late Robert Forga and his wife, Viola.   The family engaged the Waynesville Public Art Commission to find an artist, and now the decision’s down to three There’s a N.C. Highway Historical Marker about the Plott Hound at Hazelwood Elementary School in Waynesville.  The dog’s…See More
May 5
Julia Nunnally Duncan posted an event

Julia Nunnally Duncan at MACA Gift Shop

May 6, 2017 from 9am to 11:30am
Julia Nunnally Duncan will sign her latest books "A Part of Me" and "A Place That Was Home" on Saturday, May 6, from 9-11:30 at the MACA gift shop in downtown Marion.See More
May 3
Short-short Stories & Riddles shared their blog post on Facebook
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much

Another riddle, since you liked the first so much Mickey MantlePete HillRocky ColavitoDusty BakerCurt FloodMickey RiversCory Snyder List of baseball outfielders with names that have to do with layers of the earth, in order of sports greatness.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
May 2
Short-short Stories & Riddles posted a blog post

A riddle

Tying shoelaces,Lifting a mug by its handle,Lifting something that requires all fingers,Pressing down hard while writing,Shaking hands:Things hindered by a bruised forefinger. I would have had more things to record, but unfortunately my finger healed too quickly.See other posts at http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/profile/ShortshortStoriesRiddlesSee More
Apr 30
Dr. Lin Stepp posted an event

Dr. Lin Stepp at Barnes & Noble, Asheville Mall at Tunnel Road

May 13, 2017 from 2pm to 4pm
Lin Stepp will sign her latest Smoky Mtn novel DADDY'S GIRL set in NCSee More
Apr 27

Asheville Poetry Review informs the world

by Rob Neufeld

 

            “In times like these,” Newton Smith writes in the new issue of Asheville Poetry Review (APR), “when men and women are dying miserably everywhere, and when politicians and nations have lost all dignity and compassion, it is time to turn to poems.”

            The 22nd issue of the Asheville-based, internationally read journal comes through again with a representation of what’s vital in the field. 

            Does poetry fill a critical need, as many of the contributors declare?  That’s not an easy argument.  Poems do not teach you how to change a tire, though they may teach you how to change tiredness.

 

Beginning with the fetus

 

            Becky Gould Gibson’s poem, “Heading Home,” 2012 winner of the William Matthews Poetry Prize (given by the APR) takes you on a journey from conception to birth with a world of prayer.

            “The jig is up…You’re past blastocyst,” she tells a fetus.  Gibson’s at-ease, intelligent voice talks street, science, and spirituality, as in her address to the baby when it’s 12 weeks in the womb: “And where’s original sin?/  Will it show up on your next sonogram?” 

            Seven months along, Gibson intones: “Stunning how badly we’ve managed Earth.  Yet/ you’ll find it stunningly beautiful,/ wrinkled in places like you.”  Ultimately, she announces: “Here you come in your craft plaited of reeds/ dragging a seine of bright constellations…Lung/ leaves the ocean of its origin, and/ you take your first breath on land.”

 

Very like a bat

 

            The second-place winner of the prize is also a magical expression of worldly caring

            “The young need the old,” Catherine Carter writes in her poem, “The Young.”  “You wouldn’t think it, to see/ them toss their hair silky as the ears/ of vampire bats, eyes not focused on anything/ you can see.”

            But “they need your/ time, your ear for their keening,” she continues, “your admiration/ and pity for their brashness/ and tenderness…Your approval, for the like of which many/ an adult still goes thirsty.”  So, we may forgive the hunger of the bat-like child, “its dainty fangs, its fingers for wings.”

            (See full poem below.)

 

Modest profession

 

            The late poet William Matthews, in whose honor his son, Asheville poet Sebastian Matthews, established the prize, is the subject of Robert Morgan’s elegy, “In Memory of William Matthews.”

            “Bill,/ wherever you are now, I’m sure/ you’re laughing at the way we poets/ take ourselves so seriously./  And I concede the fault, except/ I want to say I took you seriously/ and was not wrong,” Morgan writes.

            As he presents his loving memories like bouquets, Morgan hears Matthews snicker and say, “Send/ no flowers, bub, but maybe some good claret might not be unwelcome.”

            Like William Matthews, many contemporary poets have abandoned conventional Western lyricism for something that sounds more Eastern: lots of music, but not rhyming or strictly metered; with a freedom to shift voices, almost conversationally, and gifted with suggestive imagery.

 

Getting beyond human

 

            Sam Hamill translates a poem written by the eighth century Chinese poet, Li Po.

            “You ask why I live/ alone in the mountain forest,” the poem begins; and concludes, “I live in the other world,/ one that lies beyond the human.”

            One of the reasons that poets can speak to us in such a special way is that they have immersed themselves in lives of reading poetry; and can demonstrate the advantages of a poetic appreciation of life.

            “In her collection ‘Covet,’ Lynell Edwards manages to illuminate the small wonders of regular life,” Janice Moore Fuller reveals in her book review (one of 20 by various reviewers in the APR).

Edwards elevates ordinary things to the level of a mythical objects, Fuller writes.  “She also throws Wordsworth’s ‘certain coloring of imagination’ over ordinary actions.”

            Every rose has its thorn and, as Edwards’ book title suggests, a hunger for beauty brings with it a painful awareness of loss.  Is it folly to covet?  Or to love?

            One answer to those questions is that the poem makes a permanent flower of the dying flower because it comes alive every time you engage with it.  For those who love and grieve—and that has to be the most sensitive among us—poetry saves lives.

 

Saved from disaffection

 

            Poetry saved Sam Hamill, the Li Po translator, and a living stand-out in the boundary-crossing poetry world.

            The current issue of APR devotes 52 pages to Hamill, continuing its tradition of shining light on under-celebrated greats; and on representing world poetry as well as local roots (seven of the eight editors, including founder Keith Flynn, are Western North Carolinians; and the eighth is from Oak Ridge).

            In the late 1950s, Hamill had been a lost teen on the road in San Francisco when the late great Kenneth Rexroth took him under his wing.

            “I spent most of my days sleeping in Golden Gate Park and wandered at night between the Tenderloin and North Beach, searching cars for things to pawn or sell or trade,” Hamill told Lisa Morphew in an interview.

            “Then one crisp afternoon, I spent my last couple of bucks to buy ‘Thirty Spanish Poems of Love & Exile,’” Rexroth’s book of translations.  “I was standing outside City Lights (bookstore in San Francisco) when Rexroth came around the corner…I told him I wanted to be a great poet like him.”

            Rexroth let him stay at his home.  Hamill dried out.  He read through Rexroth’s library.  “It’s not an exaggeration to say,” Hamill says, “he not only shaped, but also saved my life.”

            Hamill has gone on to publish 14 volumes of poetry; and many other volumes of translations and essays.  He has taught in prisons and worked with battered woman and children.

            In 1972, he co-founded Copper Canyon Press, a heralded publisher of new works of poetry.

            Then, in 2003, Esteban Moore reports in his essay about Hamill, Hamill began to speak out against the war in Iraq.  He founded Poets against War.  Major newspapers and TV networks attacked him and “as a consequence, the board and sponsors of the publishing house he had founded asked him to resign his position there for its sake.”

            We wonder if and when poetry will assume the popular place it has had in other cultures and times.  The APR gives us a window into that effort, including with a good look at a hard-knocks-schooled iconoclast such as Hamill..

            “I’m simply not much moved by the stars of what I’ll call ‘workshop poetry,’” he told Morphew.  “The avant garde frankly bores me.”

THE BOOK

Asheville Poetry Review, vol. 19, no. 1, 2012, issue 22, $13.  Visit www.ashevillepoetryreview.com.

THE YOUNG

by Catherine Carter

Second place winner of the William Matthews Poetry Prize, published in Asheville Poetry Review, vol. 19, no. 1

The Young

for the new teachers

The young need the old.

You wouldn't think, to see

them toss their hair silky as the ears

of vampire bats, eyes not focused on anything

you can see.  You wouldn't think it

from the sound of the giggling

almost too high to hear, offering you less

notice than the cries of hunting

bats.  But the young

need you.  They need your

time, your ear for their keening

and chiming, even when it means nothing

you know.  Your admiration

and pity for their brashness

and tenderness, your abnegation

of what you hoped to do this hour,

which for either of you comes once

only.  Your approval, for the like of which many

an adult still goes thirsty, fifty

years on.  Your life drained out to feed

their unfocused need.  They drink

it like bats too, eternally beautiful for having

bathed in your blood like Bathory

countesses.  They do it helplessly,

as you do to your own beloved old,

who forgive you, helplessly

as you'll forgive these, as the weakening

cow forgives the hungry bat,

its dainty fangs, its fingers for wings.

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