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Rob Neufeld posted discussions
yesterday
Rob Neufeld posted a blog post

Bobby Norfolk starts storytelling, June 28

Bobby Norfolk Throws First Pitch for Kaleidoscope: Celebrating Diversityat Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch 2014from press release June 28 eventBobby Norfolk, three-time Emmy Award-winner is the lead storyteller for the fifth season of Stories on Asheville’s Front Porch--Kaleidoscope: Celebrating Diversity, June 28 in the Rhino Courtyard of Pack Place.  The stories begin at 10:30 a.m., rain or shine, and are free to the public.  Entrances to the Rhino Courtyard are from Biltmore Avenue under…See More
yesterday
Evelyn Asher posted photos
yesterday
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Inez and Annie Daugherty and African American history

The Daughertys of Black Mountain spanned racial historyby Rob Neufeld             “The children in Cragmont (an African American neighborhood in Black Mountain) and High Top Colony, where my family lived, walked to school in groups,” Daugherty recalled about her 1920s childhood in a talk she had with me in 2005.            “White children rode the bus,” she revealed.  “They sometimes threw things at us and called us ugly names, but my mother told me, ‘You know who you are.  Those names do not…See More
Tuesday
Sue Diehl posted an event

MONTREAT COLLEGE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY LUNCHEON at Montreat College, Gaither Fellowship Hall, Montreat, NC

June 21, 2014 from 12pm to 2:30pm
Pamela Duncan, author of Moon Women, Plant Life, and The Big Beautiful, will be the speaker at the Montreat College Friends of the Library Annual Luncheon on Saturday, June 21, 2014, in the Gaither Fellowship Hall.See More
Apr 14
Rose Senehi posted events
Apr 11
Jerald Pope posted an event

It ain’t for wimps: readings on aging at Monte Vista Hotel

April 17, 2014 from 6pm to 7pm
Increased life expectancy brings with it increased opportunities, problems, and responsibilities. Both the aged and the pre-aged will find much to ponder at the Black Mountain Authors Guild’s reading at the Monte Vista this Thursday at 6 pm. Four local writers will share their thinking on the subject: Danielle Laverty will read her essay on aging that won the Black Mt. Public Library contest, Nancy Werking Poling will read from her current and published fiction, and James and Cannan Hyde will…See More
Apr 9
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Asheville Wordfest May 2-4, 2014

Asheville Wordfest 2014(Photo top right, Laurey Masterton from Asheville Chamber of Commerce; 2nd photo, Laura Hope-Gill from www.thehealingseed.com) A webpage in progress!Asheville Wordfest, an annual…See More
Apr 8
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Fiddler of the Mountains by Eva Nell Mull Wike

Fiddler and His FamilyFiddler of the Mountains: Attuned to the Life and Times of Johnny Mull by Eva Nell Mull Wike (Donning Company hardcover, Nov. 2013, 96 pages, $25)See other new WNC books Wike, author of the…See More
Apr 7
William Roy Pipes posted a blog post

Four Novels Are Now Available

I now have four Novels in print. A fifth Novel, True Love, is finished, but to date not yet published. The four available on-line are: Darby, my bestselling Appalachian novel; Hanging Dog, An Appalachian Community, is a sequel to Darby, Doodlebug, Doodlebug, Your House is on Fire, an Appalachian novel beginning in 1940; and a novelette, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, a murder mystery full of intrigue, danger, and espionage. All four novels are available on Amazon.com and wherever books are…See More
Apr 7
Bill Ramsey posted a blog post

Brain Injury Recovery

Brain injury recovery is difficult and anything but certain. When I met Angela Leigh Tucker in late 2008, she was only four months into her battle. A sudden truck-on-car crash had killed her young husband and left her hanging on to life by a thread.For the next three years I researched the topic of traumatic brain injury or TBI. Angela and I travelled together to meeting of brain injury survivors and conferences on the subject. I interviewed countless doctors, therapists, co-workers, family…See More
Apr 7
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Apr 5
Malaprop's Bookstore Cafe posted events
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Laura Hope-Gill updated their profile
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Laura Hope-Gill posted an event
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Asheville Wordfest May 2, 3, 4: Fiction, Poetry, Storytelling, more! at Asheville Lenoir-Rhyne University

May 2, 2014 at 5pm to May 4, 2014 at 5pm
Asheville Wordfest reaches its seventh year (lucky lucky!) with an expansion to include fiction, poetry, storytelling, songwriting, community conversation, poetry animation, and creative nonfiction. Coming of age with the help of North Carolina Arts Council, Katuah Market, Fine Arts Theater, Malaprops Bookstore/Cafe, and more than thirty writers, poets, musicians, and songwriters, Wordfest continues its commitment the Asheville and WNC communities, representing as many of our communities as the…See More
Apr 3
RhondaKay Brigman updated their profile
Apr 1

Unsung hero emerges in story of McDowell County integration

by Rob Neufeld

 

            When five  Old Fort black children—Richard and Norma Greenlee; Thomas Lowder; Audrey Logan; and Teresa Murphy—went to integrate Old Fort Elementary School, August 24, 1955, they stood alone.   Their three adult escorts had backed out, apparently, but Albert Joyner was watching from his window.

            “I wasn’t involved,” Joyner said.  “I came here from the eastern part of the state.  And if you weren’t born here, you were an outsider."   He had come in 1952 to work at the Oteen VA Hospital.                  

            But he says, “The Lord took my hand” that morning.  Joyner looked out his window and saw that the black adults who were supposed to escort the children weren’t there with them.  Joyner put on his best suit and went out to lead the children to the schoolhouse doors.

            “There wasn’t nothing but white,” Joyner recalled in an August 2009 interview with Kim Clark of the McDowell County Oral History Project.  Hundreds of white police officers and citizens thronged the approach.  The county school superintendent, Melvin Taylor, met Joyner on the steps.

            “Integration would not be begun this year,” Taylor said.  Yes, the Supreme Court had ruled that schools must be integrated “with all deliberate speed,” but the state legislature had directed schools to stay racially separate until issues could be worked out in court.

            In the meantime, young black children, whose school had been controversially demolished in 1950, were being transported to Marion.

            Black people had great reason to live in fear of white people, Joyner elaborated.  Two men who had intended to escort the children, but didn’t, were fired from their factory jobs.   Black men who, in the past, had bought new cars, had been fired for what was considered a transgression.. 

            “You get what they have,” Joyner said, referring to white folks, your employers told you, “‘We don’t need you.’”

            “You had to be under them,” Joyner added.  “Yeah, that’s how it was,” he said in a refrain.

            Whereas Joyner had a bank account in Pendleton, he couldn’t get one in McDowell County.  Black folks used the post office for banking, Joyner said.

            If a black person stepped out of line, Joyner related, “they’d have shot you in the foot, or something.  Nobody would have said anything, and if they had, they wouldn’t have gotten anywhere.”

            Joyner learned from a man whose grass he cut that some black folks had offered to take care of Joyner for being a trouble-maker at the school.  “No, no need of doing that,” an official had responded.

            “That’s the way it was then,” Joyner intoned.

            When the black students’ case went to court, Joyner was the one who represented them, standing with their lawyer appeal after appeal.  It would take several years for McDowell County schools to be fully integrated.

            Not long after his initial stand, Joyner was taking his sister to the bus stop in Old Fort when, the oral history project reports,  a “white railroad worker, W.W. Arney, said some harsh words to Mr. Joyner and knocked him into the fountain.”

            “I got beat up bad,” Joyner said.  “The police came out there and asked, what did I try to start…I called the sheriff, and he said he’d be up there in the morning.  I said I might not need him then.  I might be dead…That’s what that place was.  They (African Americans) were scared.”

            The coda to this story inspired people at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Prayer Breakfast last month, when Buncombe County Commission Chair David Gantt related what he’d learned from his assistant, Ellen Pfirrmann, Oral History Project partner of Kim Clark.

            “In a touching postscript, years later,” Gantt said, “Mr. Arney was a patient at the VA Hospital.  And…his nurse was Albert Joyner. 

            “I didn’t get mad at nobody,” Joyner recalled. 

            Arney had lost his leg in a car accident, and “I treated him nice,” Joyner said.  One time, he asked Arney who it was who had tried to take those kids into the school—for Arney didn’t recognize him—and Arney said, “It’s nothing really important now.”

            The policeman who had been at the scene of the assault on Joyner also became a patient at the hospital.  Joyner took care of him on a number of occasions, often involving the messiest jobs. 

            Dying, the policeman wanted to give Joyner money, but Joyner declined.  “I want you to have it,” the sick man insisted.  “And I took it,” Joyner confessed.  “I didn’t know what he was thinking.”

            After the policeman’s death, Joyner went into a filling station, where he discovered that the policeman’s wife wanted to give him free gas.

            “His wife came out and said, ‘We’ll take no money from him,’” Joyner related.  “So I wouldn’t go there anymore.  It (the offering)  wasn’t obligated  to me.  The Lord took him,” meaning it was all in His hands.

 

BOX

To learn more about The McDowell County History Project go to mcdowellhistory.com.  The project is looking to use the Joyner material to create an exhibit and archive that could be housed in the International Civil Rights Center & Museum in Greensboro.  David Gantt will be make a presentation about Albert Joyner at Hill St. Baptist Church, Asheville, 10 a.m., Feb. 13, 2011.

 

PHOTO CAPTION

“Look” magazine published the documentary photo (above) of Joyner with Richard Greenlee and Thomas Lowder, two of the five African American children trying to enter Old Fort Elementary School, Aug. 24, 1955.  The man with the cane is Col. Daniel Adams, a local inventor who supported the black community and sought redress for the destruction of its school.

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