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Ali Mangkang updated their profile
Wednesday
Ali Mangkang posted an event

Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award at Asheville Renaissance Hotel

February 7, 2015 from 5pm to 7pm
Honoring Author Robert Morgan for his selected work"The Road From Gap Creek". The presentation of the award includes a reading followed by a reception.For more informationSee More
Wednesday
Chevin Woodruff shared their event on Facebook
Tuesday
Chevin Woodruff posted an event
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An Evening with Barbara Woodall at Splendor Mountain at Splendor Mountain

January 27, 2015 from 6pm to 8pm
Barbara Taylor Woodall was born and raised in Rabun County Georgia. This county touches both North Carolina and South Carolina, so you can already guess it was a special place to grow a child. Barbara wrote about her life as a child and the wonderful people God joined her to as she grew and learned. It's Not My Mountain Anymore tells some of these stories. Barbara will share from her book and from her life, June 6, 2015 at Splendor Mountain.See More
Tuesday
Avery Ray McKinney Jr. updated their profile
Jan 23
City Lights Bookstore posted an event
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David Joy Presents His Debut Novel at City Lights Bookstore

March 6, 2015 from 6:30pm to 8pm
Webster author, David Joy will present his new novel on Friday, March 6th at 6:30 p.m. at City Lights Bookstore.  Where All Light Tends to Go, a staff pick of both Chris and Eon, is set in Jackson County and tells the story of Jacob McNeely, a young man who is in a fight against his fate. “Expertly balancing beauty and brutality, David has written a novel that stays with the reader long after the final page has been read.  Where All Light Tends to Go, though very much an Appalachian tale, is…See More
Jan 22
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jan 21
Caralyn Davis posted a blog post

Color Blind, My First Eco-Fiction, Published & Waiting to Be Read

My short story "Color Blind" is now up at Eclectica Magazine. It's got animal extinctions, Sekhmet, Santa Claus, golden Panamanian frogs, real science, fake science, and lots of cats -- in a very economical, easy-reading 1,700 words.See More
Jan 15
Sarah Harden posted an event

Rose Senehi, Speaker for CMLC's January Speaker Series at Henderson County Main Branch Library in the Kaplan Auditorium.

January 14, 2015 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Join Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy (CMLC) Wednesday, January 14th for a presentation from Rose Senehi, esteemed Chimney Rock author of novels Dancing on Rocks, Render Unto the Valley, and many more. She will read passages from her books while elaborating on her local inspirations. At the end of her readings, Senehi will conduct a Q&A session and book signing.Many of Senehi’s novels have woven together several of CMLC’s regional land conservation accomplishments. In the Shadows of…See More
Jan 12
Rodney Page commented on Rob Neufeld's group Promoting Writers
"Happy to join the group...Relatively new to North Carolina. Have published a thriller, Powers Not Delegated, and my second book, The Xerces Factor launches in April 2015. see more at my website: www.rodneypagebooks.com"
Jan 12
Rodney Page posted photos
Jan 12
Charles Oliver shared Rob Neufeld's discussion on Facebook
Jan 10
City Lights Bookstore posted events
Jan 10
Rob Neufeld posted discussions
Jan 10
Gregg Jones updated their profile
Jan 3
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

1962, Tunnel Road--an era remembered

We remember Tunnel Road and 1960by Rob Neufeld             The “Buck Burger”—“made with two pure beef patties,” tomato, lettuce, cheese, and a dill chip, “served with Buck’s own special dressing on a toasted bun.”             That was something that you could get at Buck’s Drive-In on Tunnel Road, from 1946 to 1972, when…See More
Jan 2

Ornament in Asheville—a pictorial survey

by Rob Neufeld

 

            In the urban renewal era, Asheville followed the modern trend away from ornament in architecture.  The Akzona Building (now the Biltmore Building) and the Northwestern Bank Building (now BB&T) preferred exteriors that expressed structure rather than symbolism.

 

(Photo 1.  Biltmore Building and BB&T.)

 

             In the postmodern era—that’s today, still—ornament has returned in two ways: with simplified references to historical motifs; and with new age, art-nouveau-like fantasias.

            The significance of the old ways is that people who had cared about style had connected to the classical and medieval concepts of a golden age.  The Grove Arcade, for example, puts on the clothing of a Venetian palace.  The misnamed griffins at the south entrance are Venetian winged lions.  They don’t have an eagle’s beak and talons.

            But Grove might be considered postmodern, too, in the way he combined and simplified styles.  His Italian plasterers had at their disposal a Sears catalog-type of architectural options.

            The window arches on the top level, for instance, are French.  The heart motif in the cornice atop the first floor balconies are of no classical origin.  And, of course, the most prominent feature, “GROVE,” is pure modern empire.

 

(Photo 2.  Grove Arcade emblems.)

 

(Photo 3.  S&W Cafeteria entrance detail.)

           

            The Art Deco ornamentation on Douglas Ellington’s S&W Cafeteria, a building contemporary with the Grove Arcade, is truer to sources, and incorporates into its vocabulary Aztec, Egyptian, and machine age imagery and style.  

 

(Photo 4.  Drhumor building  east side detail.)

 

           Just down Patton Ave. from the S&W in Asheville is the Drhumor Building, now the law offices of McGuire, Wood & Bissette.  Its frieze, carved into stone by Biltmore Estate stonecarver Frederic Miles, reveals an artist’s freedom in incorporating classical motifs—the Greek acanthus leaf; the Roman half-figure; the Renaissance mask—into a dynamic, narrative design.

 

 

            The Biltmore House’s French Renaissance influence on local architecture, along with its English cottage and Arts and Crafts influence in Biltmore Village, are major reference points for Asheville.  Builders and designers in the region know, when they create ornament, what local traditions they are tapping.

            The courtyard at the south wing of the Biltmore House features a number of richly decorated columns, including one that features French fleur-de-lis.

 

(Photo 5.  Biltmore House decorated column.)

(Photo 6.  Grand Bohemian column capital.)

 

            One of the newest ambitious uses of decoration is evident at the Grand Bohemian Hotel in Biltmore Village.  The columns in the lobby, for example, combine a Germanic woodcarving style with stylized classical motifs in an original way, evoking a luxury hunting lodge.

 

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