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Interview with Gail Godwin about Grief Cottage

Started by Rob Neufeld in AC-T Book Reviews Aug 3, 2017.

Ellington in Asheville--a survey

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Oct 6, 2017.

Dave Minneman, heroic portrait

Started by Rob Neufeld in Local History Aug 25, 2017.

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Rob Neufeld updated their profile
Apr 13
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Flat Rock history via a road

Travelling back in time on a Flat Rock roadby Rob Neufeld             If you walk the one mile length of North Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, you step nearly 200 years into the past.            At the east end, the 21st century reigns.  Fronting six-lane Spartanburg Highway, a super-Ingles sits above a bog; and a CVS store faces an Octopus Garden smoke shop, a chiropractor, a cell phone provider, and a six-lane avenue to I-26 a mile away .            Neither Ingles nor CVS carries the big…See More
Apr 8
George Ellison left a comment for Renea Winchester
"luv ya Renea ... Kephart bio finally done after 40 years ... free at last ... free at last... great god almighty ... free a last!"
Apr 5
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event
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Connie Regan-Blake Storytelling at Hendersonville Public Library at Henderson County Public Library - Main Branch

June 13, 2019 from 6pm to 7pm
Join Connie Regan-Blake for a family oriented evening of stories at the Hendersonville Library.See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake presents A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories at Black Mountain Center for the Arts

April 6, 2019 from 7:30pm to 9pm
Please join nationally celebrated storyteller, Connie Regan-Blake, as she hosts her workshop participants in an enchanting evening of storytelling in “A Slice of Life: An Evening of Stories.” Here are the tellers for our April 6th “Slice of Life” performance.  Christine Phillips Westfeldt, Kyra Freeman, Steve Tate, Alberta Hipps and more! The event is hosted by the …See More
Apr 1
Connie Regan-Blake updated an event
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Connie Regan-Blake's Taking Your Story to the Stage Workshop at StoryWindow Productions

April 5, 2019 to April 7, 2019
The focus of this “Taking Your Story to the Stage” 3-day workshop is on storytelling performance. Each participant is asked to come with a story that is almost “stage-ready.” Set in Connie’s home tucked in the beautiful mountains surrounding Asheville, NC, this workshop provides a supportive,…See More
Apr 1
Rap Monster posted a blog post

Stealth Hazy - 'Gun Clap'

Stealth Hazy - Gun ClapI got 80 rounds with a beam on it riding dirty I'm smoking chronic top off hear that system pound 808 thats subsonicI double down quadruple upstraight droppin with no cutwilt chamberlain on the reboundand you a fan just starstruckI…See More
Mar 26
Connie Regan-Blake posted an event

Connie Regan-Blake’s 14th Annual Summer Storytelling Retreat & Adventure at StoryWindow Productions

July 14, 2019 at 10am to July 20, 2019 at 4pm
Come to the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville for 7 days of story-listening & story-telling along with coaching, community & supportive exploration. This 14th annual workshop welcomes all levels of expertise, from beginner to experienced teller. Participants discover ways of being in the world that nurture your creative flow while developing skills to: Find, create, learn, and polish storiesEffectively integrate voice with image,…See More
Mar 2
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Feb 8
Sue Diehl posted an event
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Montreat College Friends of the Library Celebrate National Library Week at Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College, Montreat, NC

April 9, 2019 from 3pm to 5pm
Patti Callahan, author of the recent novel Becoming Mrs. Lewis, and Don W. King author of Out of My Bone: the Letters of Joy Davidman, A Naked Tree: Love Sonnets to C. S. Lewis, and Yet One More Spring: a Critical Study of Joy Davidman, will co-present on their works about Joy and her husband C.S. Lewis.  The event is free and open to the public on April 9, 2019 in Graham Chapel, Gaither Hall, Montreat College.Reception and Book signing to followSee More
Feb 8
William Roy Pipes posted a discussion

TWO NEW APPALACHIAN NOVELS

I have, just released two Appalachian Novels.OUT OF THE SHADOWS, begins deep in the Appalachian Mountains of in WNC. It is partly a true story about a young man who ran away from home at the age of fifteen. He meets another runaway, and they fall in love.A journey where he faced adversaries, but also success as he walked, hitchhiked, and made his way across the country.GONE LIKE A CANDLE IN THE WIND, is a story of three young people growing up in a farming community in the Appalachian…See More
Jan 28
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

The Main Show

The Main Show: a story-poem stage presentation(part of  Living Poem)See video of Act 1, Scene 1: The SettingProgram Notes (A program note reader comes out to read from the program notes.) Reader: Don’t listen, children, and do not hear.(A monster is coming and there’s no escapeWithin this story, and no good way to tell it, Except to gaze at the horror as at a…See More
Jan 26
Don Talley posted a discussion

Hollywood Pictures Inc in Fairview

In the 1920's it seemed the whole country was caught up in excitement about films and Hollywood.    Asheville and Western North Carolina were well aware of the hoopla of Hollywood.   In fact, Hollywood (or at least filmmaking) was already beginning to come to Western NC.I recently stumble across an article from the Jun 6 1926 issue of The Asheville Citizen Times which mentions that Hollywood Pictures Inc, was planning to film just south of Asheville, near Fairview.  But....was this really…See More
Jan 23
Connie Regan-Blake posted events
Jan 16
Rob Neufeld posted a discussion

Intermission

IntermissionHear audio by clicking mp3 attachment!(Part of poem, "Coalescence") I thought I might take a break at this point to look around,Now that I’m in the business of making things resound.It’s so nice to have the luxury of being carefree. If you stop and sit back and try to take in everything,It stuns you and you can’t focus on anythingUntil something crops up, and what…See More
Jan 16

The worst floods in WNC history

by Robert Neufeld

 

PHOTO CAPTION: Hurricane Ivan floods Asheville’s River Arts District, 2004.            

A previous story revealed a woman’s horrifying survival account, in which the Great Flood of 1916 made the Swannanoa River rise ten feet in one hour, sweeping her father into its raging current.

            The rivers in this region are capable of swelling and thrashing with monstrous force about ten times a century, yet sometimes only a few days apart.  Methods of survival and damage prevention have varied.

            Here are some of the worst floods in the history of the region.

 

17th century, Qualla Boundary

 

            According to Cherokee oral tradition, the Tuckaseegee River had reached the incredible height of 50 feet above its normal height, “covering all the flat lands.”

 

April, 1791, Swannanoa

 

            Bee Tree and Azalea elders interviewed in 1916 said that their grandfathers had described a flood, in 1791, that had risen six feet higher than one they’d just experienced. 

 

May, 1840, Bryson City

 

            It was called the “May Fresh.”  Settlers were just coming into Swain County, and the legendary flood left high water marks along the Tuckaseegee.

 

May, 1845, Biltmore

 

            Joe Cheeseborough, born in 1876 along the Swannanoa River, had said that “an old Negro slave who was born in 1798 described the flood, “spreading from hill to hill.”

 

June 17, 1876, Murphy

 

            It was called the “June Freshet.”  A Charlotte salesman visiting the town reported, “The jail went away on the bosom of the troubled waters, and had a good deal of company.”  Elsewhere in the region, the French Broad River rose steadily for two days, reaching “two feet higher than ever before,” residents recalled.  

 

Feb. 28, 1902, Marshall

 

            Buildings, horses and carriages, trains, and personal belongings were swept away by the flood

 

Nov. 19, 1906, Murphy

 

            The Hiwassee River grew 40,000 cubic feet per second to a height of about 20 inches.  It destroyed train trestles all the way to Topton. A waterspout on Fain Mountain washed away a house, carrying away a mother and her ten-year-old son. 

 

July 16, 1916, all over

 

            The Great Flood of 1916 caused record damage and loss of life.

 

Aug. 15, 1928, Canton

 

            Two tropical storms converged on the upper Pigeon River.  “The crest was some four feet lower than the record flood of August 30, 1940,” the Tennessee Valley Authority reported, “but the flood is notable in that it was the first flood to cause appreciable damage and inconvenience” since Champion built its big paper plant in 1906.

 

Aug. 13 and Aug. 30, 1940, Canton

 

            On Aug. 13, 1940, a West Indian hurricane stormed in, slowed down, and hung around for three days, dropping 17 inches of rain; at times, one inch an hour.  The Southern Railway put heavy coal cars on its bridge to protect it from crashing water and debris.  Backyards and homes were rinsed away, particularly in the Champion mill town, Fibreville.

            Just as the town cleaned up, a worse flood came, unpredictably; it had no tropical origin.  Rain fell at the rate of 2½ inches per hour.  Many bad mountain slides occurred above Lake Logan, including one that carried away the Reverend and Mrs. Bill Hampton while they slept.  Property damage was great because business owners moved their stock to above the Aug. 13 flood level, only to see that height exceeded.

            Bryson City also experienced disastrous slides and waterspouts on the Tuckaseegee.

 

Sept. 30 and Oct. 4, 1964, Rosman

 

            Four inches of rain fell the night of Sept. 29, and then after the river receded, another storm topped it, causing the fastest-rising water people had ever seen, with no time to save carpets and furniture.  Farmlands were submerged for several days.

            Four days later, more rain came, raising the upper French Broad River higher than its 1916 level.  The flood washed through homes that people had just finished cleaning and waxing.  It made Gloucester Lumber Yard’s stacks scatter like bowling pins.  It covered a drive-in movie theater in North Brevard above the speakers.

            Hendersonville experienced the same storm as the most damaging in its history.  Mud Creek swelled to form a l,200-foot lake on U.S. 25, which for a while big trucks crossed, sending waves into roadside businesses.

 

May 28, 1973, Skyland

 

            Lesser storms can have absolutely worst effects because of dam breaks. 

            David Wayne Woody rushed his two young daughters out of his home in Fowler’s Trailer Park to seek a neighbor’s brick home when waters began rising.  He saw a four-foot high tidal wave heading toward him, and took refuge in another trailer, which the water then tumbled and shoved for a mile, splitting it in half; and killing the inhabitants.  Woody’s own trailer remained unmoved.

 

Sept. 6-7 and 16, 2004, Canton

 

            Hurricane Ivan followed Hurricane Hilda, a Florida Killer, by nine days, deluging a saturated water table.  In Canton, there was a 500-year flood, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, while along the Swannanoa River, a two-to-five-year storm.

            In Macon County, Ivan caused a torrent of mud, water, trees, and rocks, which killed five, including a man whom kayakers found 17 days later on the Cullasaja River. 

            “It took about 10 seconds for me to get swept down the river,” Kathy Rion a Black Mountain resident who worked in Mars Hill told Asheville Citizen-Times reporter John Boyle.  Her car had been run off the road into a flow of mud; and she’d climbed out a window and gotten swept into her “miracle tree.”  Three rescue attempts ended with fireman heroics.  Afterward, as a famous survivor who appeared on the Jane Pauley Show, she helped people by talking about her own PTSD.  She died in 2010.

            Agencies instituted new flood prevention measures, involving floodplain maps, development regulations, and flood mitigation.

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A key part of the 1940 flood on the Tuckasegee River in Bryson City was that a dam burst upstream.  Waters reached the porch of my grandparents' home, with the porch being seven or eight feet high, perhaps 20 feet above normal river level, and at least 50 yards from the normal river bank.

Jim Casada

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